Ephemeralization

Ephemeralization, a term coined by R.wikipedia
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Buckminster Fuller

R. Buckminster FullerRichard Buckminster FullerBuckminster Fuller Institute
Ephemeralization, a term coined by R. Buckminster Fuller, is the ability of technological advancement to do "more and more with less and less until eventually you can do everything with nothing," that is, an accelerating increase in the efficiency of achieving the same or more output (products, services, information, etc.) while requiring less input (effort, time, resources, etc.).
Fuller published more than 30 books, coining or popularizing terms such as "Spaceship Earth", "Dymaxion" house/car, ephemeralization, synergetic, and "tensegrity".

Accelerating change

law of accelerating returnsaccelerateaccelerating rate
In 1938, Buckminster Fuller introduced the word ephemeralization to describe the trends of "doing more with less" in chemistry, health and other areas of industrial development.

Malthusianism

Malthusianneo-MalthusianNeo-Malthusianism
The concept has been embraced by those who argue against Malthusian philosophy.

Henry Ford

FordHenry Ford IFord, Henry
Fuller uses Henry Ford's assembly line as an example of how ephemeralization can continuously lead to better products at lower cost with no upper bound on productivity.

Assembly line

assemblyassembly linesassembly-line
Fuller uses Henry Ford's assembly line as an example of how ephemeralization can continuously lead to better products at lower cost with no upper bound on productivity.

Francis Heylighen

Heylighen, FrancisF. HeylighenHeylighen F.
Francis Heylighen and Alvin Toffler have written that ephemeralization, though it may increase our power to solve physical problems, can make non-physical problems worse.

Alvin Toffler

Alvin and Heidi TofflerHeidi TofflerAlvin Toffler's work
Francis Heylighen and Alvin Toffler have written that ephemeralization, though it may increase our power to solve physical problems, can make non-physical problems worse.

Computational intelligence

computer intelligenceartificial intelligencecomputational
The solution proposed by Heylighen is the integration of human intelligence, computer intelligence, and coordination mechanisms that direct an issue to the cognitive resource (document, person, or computer program) most fit to address it.

Self-organization

self-organizingself-organisationself-organized
This requires a distributed, self-organizing system, formed by all individuals, computers and the communication links that connect them.

Complex adaptive system

complex adaptive systemsComplexity Sciencecomplex
The resulting information system could react relatively rapidly and adaptively to requests for guidance or changes in the situation.

No Silver Bullet

Accidental complexitySilver bulletNo Silver Bullet – Essence and Accident in Software Engineering

Intelligence amplification

intelligence augmentationamplification of human intelligenceamplifying brain functions

Miniaturization

miniaturizedminiaturisationcomputer microminiaturization

Paul Graham (programmer)

Paul GrahamGraham's hierarchy of disagreementblub'' paradox

Dematerialization (economics)

dematerializationdematerialisationdematerialization of currencies
This concept is similar to ephemeralization as proposed by Buckminster Fuller.

Nine Chains to the Moon

It proposes the author's vision of future prosperity driven by ephemeralization, Fuller's term for the process of doing more with less.

List of autodidacts

List of notable autodidactsNotable autodidactsnotable contributions

Moore's law

Moore’s Lawcomputational powermass-produced

Design science revolution

Design Science
Operationally, he viewed design science as the integration of natural principles within the utilization of planetary resources to achieve ever-increasing ephemeralization: "Amongst other grand strategies for making the world work and taking care of everybody is the design science revolution of providing ever more effective tools and services with ever less, real resource investment per each unit of end performance. For instance, a communications satellite, weighing only one-quarter of a ton, is now out-performing the transoceanic communication capabilities of 175 thousand tons of copper cable."