Epidemiology of HIV/AIDS

AIDS epidemicAIDS pandemicHIV/AIDS epidemicHIV/AIDS pandemicHIV epidemicAIDSAIDS crisispandemicepidemicglobal AIDS epidemic
[[File:AIDS and HIV prevalence 2009.svg|thumb|350px|AIDS and HIV prevalence 2009wikipedia
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HIV/AIDS

AIDSHIVacquired immune deficiency syndrome
]]HIV/AIDS is a global pandemic.
Sub-Saharan Africa is the region most affected.

Botswana

MotswanaRepublic of BotswanaBotswanan
Presently, Southern Africa is the hardest hit region, with adult prevalence rates exceeding 20% in most countries in the region, and 30% in Swaziland and Botswana.
Botswana has been hit very hard by the AIDS pandemic; in 2006 it was estimated that life expectancy at birth had dropped from 65 to 35 years.

HIV/AIDS denialism

AIDS denialismAIDS denialistAIDS denialists
AIDS-denialist policies have impeded the creation of effective programs for distribution of antiretroviral drugs.
The government of then President Thabo Mbeki was sympathetic to the views of HIV/AIDS denialists, with critics charging that denialist influence was responsible for the slow and ineffective governmental response to the country's massive AIDS epidemic.

World Health Organization

WHOWorld Health OrganisationWorld Health Organization (WHO)
In 2000, the World Health Organization estimated that 25% of the units of blood transfused in Africa were not tested for HIV, and that 10% of HIV infections in Africa were transmitted via blood.
2006: The organization endorsed the world's first official HIV/AIDS Toolkit for Zimbabwe, which formed the basis for global prevention, treatment, and support the plan to fight the AIDS pandemic.

Hank M. Tavera

Henry M. Tavera (January 19, 1944, East Los Angeles, California – February 27, 2000) was an AIDS activist and archivist based in the Mission District of San Francisco, California; his 1979 move to the region put him at the forefront of the AIDS epidemic via his involvement in various HIV/AIDS service organizations as well as AIDS theatre.

Medicalization

medicalisationmedicalizedmedicalize
Regarding the social effects of the HIV/AIDS pandemic, some sociologists suggest that AIDS has caused a "profound re-medicalisation of sexuality".
The HIV/AIDS pandemic allegedly caused from the 1980s a "profound re-medicalization of sexuality".

List of countries by HIV/AIDS adult prevalence rate

HIV/AIDS rateHIV/AIDS prevalence rateHIV prevalence rate

Pandemic

plaguepandemicsplagues
]]HIV/AIDS is a global pandemic.

Global Burden of Disease Study

Global Burden of Diseaseglobal burden of disease collaborationGlobal Burden of Disease Project
The 2015 Global Burden of Disease Study, in a report published in The Lancet, estimated that the global incidence of HIV infection peaked in 1997 at 3.3 million per year.

The Lancet

LancetLancet OncologyThe Lancet Oncology
The 2015 Global Burden of Disease Study, in a report published in The Lancet, estimated that the global incidence of HIV infection peaked in 1997 at 3.3 million per year.

HIV/AIDS in South Africa

AIDS in South AfricaHIV/AIDSSouth Africa
South Africa has the largest population of people with HIV of any country in the world, at 7.06;million.

East Asia

East AsianEastEastern Asia
Prevalence is lowest in East Asia at 0.1%.

United States

AmericanU.S.USA
In 2008, approximately 1.2 million people in the United States had HIV; 20% did not realize that they were infected.

Kinshasa

LéopoldvilleLeopoldvilleKinshasa, Congo
A reconstruction of its genetic history shows that the HIV pandemic almost certainly originated in Kinshasa, the capital of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, around 1920.

Democratic Republic of the Congo

Democratic Republic of CongoCongoDR Congo
A reconstruction of its genetic history shows that the HIV pandemic almost certainly originated in Kinshasa, the capital of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, around 1920.

Sub-Saharan Africa

sub-SaharanSub Saharan AfricaSub-Saharan African

Eastern Europe

Eastern EuropeanEasternEast European
There is growing concern about a rapidly growing epidemic in Eastern Europe and Central Asia, where an estimated 1.23–3.7 million people were infected as of December 2011, though the adult (15–49) prevalence rate is low (1.1%).

Central Asia

Central AsianCentralCentral Asian Republics
There is growing concern about a rapidly growing epidemic in Eastern Europe and Central Asia, where an estimated 1.23–3.7 million people were infected as of December 2011, though the adult (15–49) prevalence rate is low (1.1%).

Endemic (epidemiology)

endemicendemic diseasecommon
HIV infection is becoming endemic in sub-Saharan Africa, which is home to just over 12% of the world’s population but two-thirds of all people infected with HIV.

Southern Africa

SouthernSouthern AfricanSouth Africa
Presently, Southern Africa is the hardest hit region, with adult prevalence rates exceeding 20% in most countries in the region, and 30% in Swaziland and Botswana.

Eswatini

SwazilandSwaziEswatini (Swaziland)
Presently, Southern Africa is the hardest hit region, with adult prevalence rates exceeding 20% in most countries in the region, and 30% in Swaziland and Botswana.

East Africa

Eastern AfricaEastEastern
Eastern Africa also experiences relatively high levels of prevalence with estimates above 10% in some countries, although there are signs that the pandemic is declining in this region.

West Africa

West AfricanWestWestern Africa
West Africa on the other hand has been much less affected by the pandemic.

Sexually transmitted infection

venereal diseasesexually transmitted diseasesexually transmitted diseases
The widespread prevalence of sexually transmitted diseases, the promiscuous culture, the practice of scarification, unsafe blood transfusions, and the poor state of hygiene and nutrition in some areas may all be facilitating factors in the transmission of HIV-1 (Bentwich et al., 1995).

Promiscuity

promiscuouswomanizerwomanizing
The widespread prevalence of sexually transmitted diseases, the promiscuous culture, the practice of scarification, unsafe blood transfusions, and the poor state of hygiene and nutrition in some areas may all be facilitating factors in the transmission of HIV-1 (Bentwich et al., 1995).