Episodic tremor and slip

non-earthquake seismic rumbling
Episodic tremor and slip (ETS) is a seismological phenomenon observed in some subduction zones that is characterized by non-earthquake seismic rumbling, or tremor, and slow slip along the plate interface.wikipedia
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Earthquake

earthquakesseismic activityseismic
Episodic tremor and slip (ETS) is a seismological phenomenon observed in some subduction zones that is characterized by non-earthquake seismic rumbling, or tremor, and slow slip along the plate interface.
The word tremor is also used for non-earthquake seismic rumbling.

Slow earthquake

slippageSlowslow slip
Episodic tremor and slip (ETS) is a seismological phenomenon observed in some subduction zones that is characterized by non-earthquake seismic rumbling, or tremor, and slow slip along the plate interface.
episodic tremor and slip (ETS)

Vancouver Island

West Coast of Vancouver IslandVancouver Island, British ColumbiaIsland
Shortly after, the Geological Survey of Canada coined the term "episodic tremor and slip" to characterize observations of GPS measurements in the Vancouver Island area. Vancouver Island lies in the eastern, North American region of the Cascadia subduction zone.
Vancouver Island was the location of the observation of the episodic tremor and slip seismic phenomenon.

Cascadia subduction zone

CascadiaCascadia Abyssal PlainCascadia fault line
Vancouver Island lies in the eastern, North American region of the Cascadia subduction zone.
Below 30 km the plate interface exhibits episodic tremor and slip.

Seismology

seismicseismologistseismologists
Episodic tremor and slip (ETS) is a seismological phenomenon observed in some subduction zones that is characterized by non-earthquake seismic rumbling, or tremor, and slow slip along the plate interface.

Subduction

subduction zonesubductedsubducting
Episodic tremor and slip (ETS) is a seismological phenomenon observed in some subduction zones that is characterized by non-earthquake seismic rumbling, or tremor, and slow slip along the plate interface.

Geological Survey of Canada

GSCCanadian Geological SurveyGeological Survey
Shortly after, the Geological Survey of Canada coined the term "episodic tremor and slip" to characterize observations of GPS measurements in the Vancouver Island area.

Global Positioning System

GPSGlobal Positioning System (GPS)global positioning systems
Shortly after, the Geological Survey of Canada coined the term "episodic tremor and slip" to characterize observations of GPS measurements in the Vancouver Island area.

Moment magnitude scale

moment magnitudeM w magnitude
In Cascadia, these events are marked by about two weeks of 1 to 10 Hz seismic trembling and non-earthquake ("aseismic") slip on the plate boundary equivalent to a magnitude 7 earthquake.

Strike and dip

strikedipdipping
(Tremor is a weak seismological signal only detectable by very sensitive seismometers.) Recent episodes of tremor and slip in the Cascadia region have occurred down-dip of the region ruptured in the 1700 Cascadia earthquake.

1700 Cascadia earthquake

Cascadia earthquakeCascadia earthquake of 17001700
(Tremor is a weak seismological signal only detectable by very sensitive seismometers.) Recent episodes of tremor and slip in the Cascadia region have occurred down-dip of the region ruptured in the 1700 Cascadia earthquake.

New Zealand

🇳🇿NZLNZ
Every five years a year-long quake of this type occurs beneath the New Zealand capital, Wellington.

Wellington

Wellington, New ZealandWellington CityWellington City Council
Every five years a year-long quake of this type occurs beneath the New Zealand capital, Wellington.

Juan de Fuca Plate

Juan de FucaJuan de Fuca tectonic plateJuan de Fuca oceanic plate
In the Cascadia subduction zone, the Juan de Fuca Plate, a relic of the ancient Farallon Plate, is actively subducting eastward underneath the North American Plate.

Farallon Plate

FarallonFarallon oceanic plateFarallon tectonic plate
In the Cascadia subduction zone, the Juan de Fuca Plate, a relic of the ancient Farallon Plate, is actively subducting eastward underneath the North American Plate.

North American Plate

North AmericanNorth American tectonic plateNorth America tectonic plate
In the Cascadia subduction zone, the Juan de Fuca Plate, a relic of the ancient Farallon Plate, is actively subducting eastward underneath the North American Plate.

Geodesy

geodeticgeodesistgeodesic
Geodetic measurements show periodic reversals in the motion (i.e., westward movement) of the overthrusting North American Plate.

Hypocenter

hypocentrefocusfocal depth
Slow slip events are distinguished from earthquakes by their propagation speed and focus.

S-wave

shear waveshearshear waves
In contrast, a typical earthquake rupture velocity is 70 to 90% of the S-wave velocity, or approximately 3.5 km/s.

Megathrust earthquake

megathrustmegathrust typemegathrust earthquakes
Because slow slip events occur in subduction zones, their relationship to megathrust earthquakes is of economic, human, and scientific importance.

Shear zone

zone of deformationdeformation zoneseismogenic zone
If the slow slip event extends into the seismogenic zone, accumulated stress would be released, decreasing the risk of a catastrophic earthquake.

Seismic wave

seismic wavesseismic velocitybody waves
Seismic waves generated by earthquakes are high-frequency and short-lived.

Fault (geology)

faultfaultsstrike-slip
Furthermore, while earthquakes are caused by the rupture of faults, tremor is generally attributed to underground movement of fluids (magmatic or hydrothermal).

San Andreas Fault

San AndreasSan Andreas Fault ZoneSan Andreas Rift Zone
As well as in subduction zones, tremor has been detected in transform faults such as the San Andreas.

Nankai Trough

NankaiNankai accretionary complex
In both the Cascadia and Nankai subduction zones, slow slip events are directly associated with tremor.