Equitable Building (Manhattan)

Equitable Building120 BroadwayBankers ClubEquitable Building (New York City)The Equitable Building
The Equitable Building is a 40-story office building in New York City, located at 120 Broadway between Pine and Cedar Streets in the Financial District of Lower Manhattan.wikipedia
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1916 Zoning Resolution

first zoning regulationsZoning Resolution of 19161916 Zoning Act
This contributed to the adoption of the first modern building and zoning restrictions on vertical structures in Manhattan, the 1916 Zoning Resolution.
The zoning resolution reflected both borough and local interests, and was proposed after the development of 120 Broadway (the Equitable Building) in Lower Manhattan.

Ernest R. Graham (architect)

Ernest R. GrahamErnest GrahamErnest R. Graham & Associates
The skyscraper was designed by Ernest R. Graham—the successor to D. H. Burnham & Company —with Peirce Anderson as the architect-in-charge.
Graham designed the National Postal Museum in Washington, D.C. and the Equitable Building in New York City, among many others.

Financial District, Manhattan

Financial DistrictWall StreetJohn Street
The Equitable Building is a 40-story office building in New York City, located at 120 Broadway between Pine and Cedar Streets in the Financial District of Lower Manhattan.
There are also several smaller ZIP Codes spanning one block, including 10045 around the Federal Reserve Bank; 10271 around the Equitable Building; and 10279 around the Woolworth Building.

Early skyscrapers

skyscraperearly skyscraperfirst skyscraper
The skyscraper was designed by Ernest R. Graham—the successor to D. H. Burnham & Company —with Peirce Anderson as the architect-in-charge.
The campaign for change was helped by the construction of the Equitable Building in 1915 at the estimated cost of $29 million ($10.9 billion in 2010 terms), which rapidly became infamous as its vast height and bulk blocked views cast neighbours into permanent shade.

Setback (architecture)

setbackssetbackset back
Built as the headquarters of the Equitable Life Insurance Company, the Equitable Building was controversial because of its lack of setbacks, which in turn does not allow sunlight to reach the surrounding ground.
Thus, the 38-story Equitable Building, constructed in New York in 1915, produced a huge shadow, said to "cast a noonday shadow four blocks long" which effectively deprived neighboring properties of sunlight.

Zoning

zonedrezoningzoning laws
This contributed to the adoption of the first modern building and zoning restrictions on vertical structures in Manhattan, the 1916 Zoning Resolution.
In 1916, New York City adopted the first zoning regulations to apply citywide as a reaction to The Equitable Building which towered over the neighboring residences, diminishing the availability of sunshine.

Yule Marble

Colorado state stoneYule
The white marble of the building is Yule marble, quarried in Marble, Colorado, which is also the source of the marble used for the Tomb of the Unknowns and the Lincoln Memorial.
Yule Marble quarried between 1907 and 1941 can be found in banks, mausoleums, libraries, schools, hotels, and government buildings from the west coast (Seattle south to Los Angeles) to the east coast, including the Equitable Building skyscraper in New York City.

Marble, Colorado

MarbleTown of MarbleHistory of Marble, Colorado
The white marble of the building is Yule marble, quarried in Marble, Colorado, which is also the source of the marble used for the Tomb of the Unknowns and the Lincoln Memorial.
It was also used for the construction of the Equitable Building, a historically important early skyscraper in New York City.

ALM (company)

Legal TimesALMAmerican Lawyer Media
Current tenants include the New York City Department of City Planning, Macmillan Publishers, ALM, Beyer Blinder Belle, and the Securities Industry and Financial Markets Association.
ALM (formerly American Lawyer Media) is a media company headquartered in the Equitable Building in New York City, and is a provider of specialized business news and information, focused primarily on the legal, insurance, and commercial real estate sectors.

AXA Equitable Holdings

Equitable Life Assurance SocietyThe Equitable Life Assurance Society of the United StatesAXA Equitable Life Insurance Company
Built as the headquarters of the Equitable Life Insurance Company, the Equitable Building was controversial because of its lack of setbacks, which in turn does not allow sunlight to reach the surrounding ground.
After the company's headquarters building burned down in 1912, Equitable moved to the Equitable Building at 120 Broadway in Manhattan.

Larry Silverstein

Larry A. Silverstein
After buying the building, Larry Silverstein renovated and restored it at a cost of $30 million, with renovations completed in 1990.
In 1980, he renovated the building at 11 West 42nd Street, and acquired the lease for the Equitable Building at 120 Broadway.

Equitable Life Building (Manhattan)

Equitable Life BuildingEquitable Life Assurance BuildingEquitable Life Building (New York City)
When the Equitable's previous headquarters, the Equitable Life Building, was destroyed by fire in 1912, the same site at 120 Broadway was chosen as the location for its new headquarters building.
The present Equitable Building was completed in 1915 on the same plot, and was designed by Ernest R. Graham & Associates.

City Investing Building

165 BroadwayCity Investing Company
Opponents of the buildings were outraged at the unprecedented volume of the building, which cast a seven-acre (28,000 m 2 ) shadow on the surrounding streets, casting a permanent shadow on the Singer Building up to its 27th floor, the City Investing Building up to its 24th floor, and completely cutting off sunshine to at least three other buildings shorter than 21 stories.
Along with the neighboring 1908 Singer Building (briefly the tallest building in the world) the 1908 Hudson Terminal (the largest office building of its time), the mammoth 1915 Equitable Building, and others, the City Investing Building stood as one of the most frequently photographed downtown skyscrapers, and a demonstration, for good or bad, of urban density.

Broadway (Manhattan)

BroadwayGreat White WayCanyon of Heroes
The Equitable Building is a 40-story office building in New York City, located at 120 Broadway between Pine and Cedar Streets in the Financial District of Lower Manhattan.

Manhattan

Manhattan, New YorkManhattan, New York CityNew York
The Woolworth Building, and its distinctive Gothic architecture, took the title in 1913, topping off at 792 ft. Structures such as the Equitable Building of 1915, which rises vertically forty stories from the sidewalk, prompted the passage of the 1916 Zoning Resolution, requiring new buildings to contain setbacks withdrawing progressively at a defined angle from the street as they rose, in order to preserve a view of the sky at street level.

Silverstein Properties

Silverstein Properties Inc.Silverstein Properties, Inc.Silverstein Properties Inc
The Equitable Building's current owner, Silverstein Properties, purchased it in 1980.
SPI's real estate business has been one of the largest investors in New York City real estate over the past fifty years, having developed, owned and managed more than 40 million square feet of office, residential, hotel and retail properties including the new World Trade Center, 30 Park Place (Four Seasons Private Residences New York Downtown), 120 Wall Street, Equitable Building, and Americas Tower.

Beyer Blinder Belle

Beyer Blinder Belle Architects and PlannersJohn Belle
Current tenants include the New York City Department of City Planning, Macmillan Publishers, ALM, Beyer Blinder Belle, and the Securities Industry and Financial Markets Association.

Macmillan Publishers

MacmillanPan MacmillanMacmillan Company
Current tenants include the New York City Department of City Planning, Macmillan Publishers, ALM, Beyer Blinder Belle, and the Securities Industry and Financial Markets Association.

New York City

New YorkNew York, New YorkNew York City, New York
The Equitable Building is a 40-story office building in New York City, located at 120 Broadway between Pine and Cedar Streets in the Financial District of Lower Manhattan.

Lower Manhattan

Downtown ManhattanLowerdowntown
The Equitable Building is a 40-story office building in New York City, located at 120 Broadway between Pine and Cedar Streets in the Financial District of Lower Manhattan.

D. H. Burnham & Company

D.H. Burnham & CompanyD. H. Burnham & Co.D. H. Burnham and Company
The skyscraper was designed by Ernest R. Graham—the successor to D. H. Burnham & Company —with Peirce Anderson as the architect-in-charge.

National Historic Landmark

National Historic Landmark DistrictNational Historic LandmarksNational Historical Landmark
The building was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1978 and a New York City landmark in 1996.

Neoclassicism

neoclassicalClassical RevivalNeoclassic
The building is in the neoclassical style, rising 538 ft (164 m) with a total floor area of 1,849,394 square feet (176,000 m²), giving a floor area ratio of 30.

Floor area ratio

plot ratioFloor Space IndexFAR
The building is in the neoclassical style, rising 538 ft (164 m) with a total floor area of 1,849,394 square feet (176,000 m²), giving a floor area ratio of 30.