Erasmus

Desiderius ErasmusErasmus of RotterdamErasmianDesiderius Erasmus RoterodamusErasmus von RotterdamDesiderius Erasmus of RotterdamErasmistErasmus, DesideriusÉrasmeDesiderus Erasmus
Desiderius Erasmus Roterodamus (28 October 1466 – 12 July 1536), known as Erasmus or Erasmus of Rotterdam, was a Dutch philosopher and Christian humanist who is widely considered to have been the greatest scholar of the northern Renaissance.wikipedia
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Basel

Basel, SwitzerlandBasleBâle
Erasmus died suddenly in Basel in 1536 while preparing to return to Brabant and was buried in Basel Minster, the former cathedral of the city.
The University of Basel, Switzerland's oldest university (founded in 1460), and the city's centuries-long commitment to humanism, have made Basel a safe haven at times of political unrest in other parts of Europe for such notable people as Erasmus of Rotterdam, the Holbein family, Friedrich Nietzsche, and in the 20th century also Hermann Hesse and Karl Jaspers.

Julius Excluded from Heaven

Julius ExclususJulius exclusus de coelis
He also wrote On Free Will, In Praise of Folly, Handbook of a Christian Knight, On Civility in Children, Copia: Foundations of the Abundant Style, Julius Exclusus, and many other works.
Julius Excluded from Heaven (Iulius exclusus e coelis) is a dialogue that was written in 1514, commonly attributed to the Dutch humanist and theologian Desiderius Erasmus.

De libero arbitrio diatribe sive collatio

On Free WillDiscourses On the Freedom of the WillThe Freedom of the Will
He also wrote On Free Will, In Praise of Folly, Handbook of a Christian Knight, On Civility in Children, Copia: Foundations of the Abundant Style, Julius Exclusus, and many other works.
De libero arbitrio diatribe sive collatio (literally Of free will: Discourses or Comparisons) is the Latin title of a polemical work written by Desiderius Erasmus of Rotterdam in 1524.

Christian humanism

Christian humanisthumanistChristian humanists
Desiderius Erasmus Roterodamus (28 October 1466 – 12 July 1536), known as Erasmus or Erasmus of Rotterdam, was a Dutch philosopher and Christian humanist who is widely considered to have been the greatest scholar of the northern Renaissance.
Christian humanism originated towards the end of the 15th century with the early work of figures such as Jakob Wimpfeling, John Colet, and Thomas More and would go on to dominate much of the thought in the first half of the 16th century with the emergence of widely influential Renaissance and humanistic intellectual figures like Jacques Lefèvre d'Étaples and especially Erasmus, who would become the greatest scholar of the northern Renaissance.

Northern Renaissance

RenaissanceNorthernNorthern European
Desiderius Erasmus Roterodamus (28 October 1466 – 12 July 1536), known as Erasmus or Erasmus of Rotterdam, was a Dutch philosopher and Christian humanist who is widely considered to have been the greatest scholar of the northern Renaissance.
Writers and humanists such as Rabelais, Pierre de Ronsard and Desiderius Erasmus were greatly influenced by the Italian Renaissance model and were part of the same intellectual movement.

Copia: Foundations of the Abundant Style

copiaDe copiaDe Copia Rerum
He also wrote On Free Will, In Praise of Folly, Handbook of a Christian Knight, On Civility in Children, Copia: Foundations of the Abundant Style, Julius Exclusus, and many other works.
Copia: Foundations of the Abundant Style (De Utraque Verborum ac Rerum Copia) is a rhetoric textbook written by Dutch humanist Desiderius Erasmus, and first published in 1512.

Martin Luther

LutherLutheranLuther, Martin
While he was critical of the abuses within the Catholic Church and called for reform, he nonetheless kept his distance from Luther, Henry VIII, and John Calvin and continued to recognise the authority of the pope, emphasizing a middle way with a deep respect for traditional faith, piety and grace, and rejecting Luther's emphasis on faith alone.
This teaching by Luther was clearly expressed in his 1525 publication On the Bondage of the Will, which was written in response to On Free Will by Desiderius Erasmus (1524).

William Grocyn

GrocynGrocyn Lecturer
His time in England was fruitful in the making of lifelong friendships with the leaders of English thought in the days of King Henry VIII: John Colet, Thomas More, John Fisher, Thomas Linacre and William Grocyn.
undefined 1446 – 1519) was an English scholar, a friend of Erasmus.

Jan Standonck

In 1495, with Bishop Henry's consent and a stipend, Erasmus went on to study at the University of Paris, in the Collège de Montaigu, a centre of reforming zeal, under the direction of the ascetic Jan Standonck, of whose rigors he complained.
He lived at a time when this model of reform was under increasing pressure from more thoroughgoing critiques—including that of one of his most famous students, Erasmus.

John Colet

Dean ColetColetDr Colet
His time in England was fruitful in the making of lifelong friendships with the leaders of English thought in the days of King Henry VIII: John Colet, Thomas More, John Fisher, Thomas Linacre and William Grocyn.
John Colet was a friend of Erasmus, a key figure in Christian humanism.

Deventer

Deventer, NetherlandsSchalkhaarColmschate
At the age of nine, he and his older brother Peter were sent to one of the best Latin schools in the Netherlands, located at Deventer and owned by the chapter clergy of the Lebuïnuskerk (St Lebuin's Church), though some earlier biographies assert it was a school run by the Brethren of the Common Life.
Deventer is the birthplace of Geert Groote and home to his Brethren of the Common Life, a school of religious thought that influenced Thomas a Kempis and Erasmus in later times.

Queens' College, Cambridge

Queens' CollegeQueensQueens’ College, Cambridge
He stayed at Queens' College, Cambridge, from 1510 to 1515.
Its most famous matriculant is Desiderius Erasmus, who studied at the college during his trips to England between 1506 and 1515.

Renaissance

the RenaissanceEarly RenaissanceEuropean Renaissance
The University was then the chief seat of Scholastic learning but already coming under the influence of Renaissance humanism.
This new engagement with Greek Christian works, and particularly the return to the original Greek of the New Testament promoted by humanists Lorenzo Valla and Erasmus, would help pave the way for the Protestant Reformation.

Rotterdam

Rotterdam, NetherlandsRotterdam, The NetherlandsHistorisch Museum Rotterdam
Desiderius Erasmus is reported to have been born in Rotterdam on 28 October in the late 1460s.
Rotterdam has one major university, the Erasmus University Rotterdam (EUR), named after one of the city's famous former inhabitants, Desiderius Erasmus.

Thomas Linacre

Linacre LinacreLinacre lecturer
His time in England was fruitful in the making of lifelong friendships with the leaders of English thought in the days of King Henry VIII: John Colet, Thomas More, John Fisher, Thomas Linacre and William Grocyn.
Among his pupils was one—Erasmus—whose name alone would suffice to preserve the memory of his instructor in Greek, and others of note in letters and politics, such as Sir Thomas More, Prince Arthur and Queen Mary I of England.

Thomas More

Sir Thomas MoreSt. Thomas MoreSaint Thomas More
His time in England was fruitful in the making of lifelong friendships with the leaders of English thought in the days of King Henry VIII: John Colet, Thomas More, John Fisher, Thomas Linacre and William Grocyn.
According to his friend, theologian Desiderius Erasmus of Rotterdam, More once seriously contemplated abandoning his legal career to become a monk.

Publio Fausto Andrelini

Fausto AndreliniFaustus Andrelinus
For instance, Erasmus became an intimate friend of an Italian humanist Publio Fausto Andrelini, poet and "professor of humanity" in Paris.
1462 in Forlì – 25 February 1518 ) was an Italian humanist poet, an intimate friend of Erasmus in the 1490s, who spread the New Learning in France.

Brethren of the Common Life

Brothers of the Common LifeBrethren of Common LifeBrothers and Sisters of the Common Life
At the age of nine, he and his older brother Peter were sent to one of the best Latin schools in the Netherlands, located at Deventer and owned by the chapter clergy of the Lebuïnuskerk (St Lebuin's Church), though some earlier biographies assert it was a school run by the Brethren of the Common Life.
Many famous men attended their schools, including Nicholas of Cusa, Thomas à Kempis, and Erasmus, all of whom studied at the Brethren's school at Deventer.

John Fisher

St John FisherSaint John FisherBishop Fisher
His time in England was fruitful in the making of lifelong friendships with the leaders of English thought in the days of King Henry VIII: John Colet, Thomas More, John Fisher, Thomas Linacre and William Grocyn.
Besides his share in the Lady Margaret's foundations, Fisher gave further proof of his zeal for learning by inducing Erasmus to visit Cambridge.

William Blount, 4th Baron Mountjoy

Blount, William, Lord MountjoyLady MountjoyWilliam Blount, Lord Mountjoy
In 1499 he was invited back to England by William Blount, 4th Baron Mountjoy, who offered to accompany him on his trip back to England.
Blount was a pupil of Erasmus, who called him inter nobiles doctissimus ("The most learned amongst the nobles").

Vulgate

Latin VulgateVulgate BibleVulgata
Using humanist techniques for working on texts, he prepared important new Latin and Greek editions of the New Testament, which raised questions that would be influential in the Protestant Reformation and Catholic Counter-Reformation.
Erasmus published an edition corrected to agree better with the Greek and Hebrew in 1516.

St Paul's School, London

St Paul's SchoolSt. Paul's SchoolSt Paul
He did however assist his friend John Colet by authoring Greek textbooks and procuring members of staff for the newly established St Paul's School.
Colet was an outspoken critic of the powerful and worldly Church of his day, a friend of Erasmus and Sir Thomas More.

Novum Instrumentum omne

Novum TestamentumGreek New TestamentNew Testament
His hurried effort was published by his friend Johann Froben of Basel in 1516 and thence became the first published Greek New Testament, the ''Novum Instrumentum omne, diligenter ab Erasmo Rot.
It was prepared by Desiderius Erasmus (1469–1536) and printed by Johann Froben (1460–1527) of Basel.

Textual criticism

critical editiontextual scholarstextual critic
He collected all the Vulgate manuscripts he could find to create a critical edition.
Textual criticism was an important aspect of the work of many Renaissance Humanists, such as Desiderius Erasmus, who edited the Greek New Testament, creating the Textus Receptus.

Textus Receptus

received textGreek New TestamentTR
Later versions of the Greek New Testament by others, but based on Erasmus' Greek New Testament, became known as the Textus Receptus.
In Christianity, the Textus Receptus (Latin: "received text") is an edition of the Greek texts of the New Testament established by Erasmus in the 16th century.