Eric S. Raymond

Eric RaymondEric Steven RaymondRaymond, EricRevenge of the HackersCatb.orgEric S RaymondESRHow To Ask Questions The Smart WayRaymond, E.S.
Eric Steven Raymond (born December 4, 1957), often referred to as ESR, is an American software developer, open-source software advocate, and author of the 1997 essay and 1999 book The Cathedral and the Bazaar.wikipedia
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The Cathedral and the Bazaar

bazaarcathedralbazaar model
Eric Steven Raymond (born December 4, 1957), often referred to as ESR, is an American software developer, open-source software advocate, and author of the 1997 essay and 1999 book The Cathedral and the Bazaar. Soon after this experience, in 1997, he wrote the essay "The Cathedral and the Bazaar", detailing his thoughts on open-source software development and why it should be done as openly as possible (the "bazaar" approach).
The Cathedral and the Bazaar: Musings on Linux and Open Source by an Accidental Revolutionary (abbreviated CatB) is an essay, and later a book, by Eric S. Raymond on software engineering methods, based on his observations of the Linux kernel development process and his experiences managing an open source project, fetchmail.

Open-source software

open sourceopen-sourceopen source software
Eric Steven Raymond (born December 4, 1957), often referred to as ESR, is an American software developer, open-source software advocate, and author of the 1997 essay and 1999 book The Cathedral and the Bazaar.
In 1997, Eric Raymond published The Cathedral and the Bazaar, a reflective analysis of the hacker community and free-software principles.

Jargon File

The Jargon FileHacker koanThe New Hacker's Dictionary
In the 1990s, he edited and updated the Jargon File, currently in print as The New Hacker's Dictionary.
Eric S. Raymond; third edition published 1996).

Open-source software development

open-source developmentopen source software developmentopen-source
Soon after this experience, in 1997, he wrote the essay "The Cathedral and the Bazaar", detailing his thoughts on open-source software development and why it should be done as openly as possible (the "bazaar" approach).
In 1997, Eric S. Raymond wrote The Cathedral and the Bazaar.

Open Source Initiative

OSIOpen Source Initiative (OSI)Open Source software
He co-founded the Open Source Initiative in 1998, taking on the self-appointed role of ambassador of open source to the press, business and public.
The organization was founded in late February 1998 by Bruce Perens and Eric S. Raymond, part of a group inspired by the Netscape Communications Corporation publishing the source code for its flagship Netscape Communicator product.

Fetchmail

In 1996 Raymond took over development of the open-source email software "popclient", renaming it to Fetchmail.
Its chief significance is perhaps that its author, Eric S. Raymond, used it as a model to discuss his theories of open source software development in a widely read and influential essay on software development methodologies, The Cathedral and the Bazaar.

Open-source model

open sourceopen-sourceopen source technology
He co-founded the Open Source Initiative in 1998, taking on the self-appointed role of ambassador of open source to the press, business and public.
The group included Christine Peterson, Todd Anderson, Larry Augustin, Jon Hall, Sam Ockman, Michael Tiemann and Eric S. Raymond.

The Art of Unix Programming

His 2003 book The Art of Unix Programming discusses user tools for programming and other tasks.
The Art of Unix Programming by Eric S. Raymond is a book about the history and culture of Unix programming from its earliest days in 1969 to 2003 when it was published, covering both genetic derivations such as BSD and conceptual ones such as Linux.

Linux Kongress

He first presented his thesis at the annual Linux Kongress on May 27, 1997.
Speakers at the conference included kernel developers like Linus Torvalds, Alan Cox, Theodore Ts'o, Rusty Russell, James Bottomley, user space developers like Kalle Dalheimer and Miguel de Icaza, and open source advocates like Eric S. Raymond and Jon Hall.

Linus's law

given enough eyeballs, all bugs are shallowLinus' Law
Raymond coined an aphorism he dubbed Linus's law, inspired by Linus Torvalds: "Given enough eyeballs, all bugs are shallow".
The law was formulated by Eric S. Raymond in his essay and book The Cathedral and the Bazaar (1999), and was named in honor of Linus Torvalds.

Jamie Zawinski

Zawinski's law of software envelopmentJamie W. ZawinskiZawinski's Law
The internal white paper by Frank Hecker that led to the release of the Mozilla (then Netscape) source code in 1998 cited The Cathedral and the Bazaar as "independent validation" of ideas proposed by Eric Hahn and Jamie Zawinski.
Eric S. Raymond commented that while this law goes against the minimalist philosophy of Unix (a set of "small, sharp tools"), it actually addresses the real need of end users to keep together tools for interrelated tasks, even though for a coder implementation of these tools clearly consists of independent jobs.

Richard Stallman

Richard M. StallmanStallmanRichard Matthew Stallman
The "very seductive" moral and ethical rhetoric of Richard Stallman and the Free Software Foundation fails, he said, "not because his principles are wrong, but because that kind of language ... simply does not persuade anybody".
Eric S. Raymond, one of the creators of the open-source movement, argues that moral arguments, rather than pragmatic ones, alienate potential allies and hurt the end goal of removing code secrecy.

Software bug

bugsbugsoftware bugs
Raymond coined an aphorism he dubbed Linus's law, inspired by Linus Torvalds: "Given enough eyeballs, all bugs are shallow".
A school of thought popularized by Eric S. Raymond as Linus's law says that popular open-source software has more chance of having few or no bugs than other software, because "given enough eyeballs, all bugs are shallow".

Homesteading the Noosphere

"Homesteading the Noosphere" (abbreviated HtN) is an essay written by Eric S. Raymond about the social workings of open-source software development.

Configuration Menu Language

Configuration Menu Language 2
In 2000–2002 he created Configuration Menu Language 2 (CML2), a source code configuration system; while originally intended for the Linux operating system, it was rejected by kernel developers.
Eric S. Raymond wrote a menu-driven module named CML2 to replace it, but it was officially rejected.

Free software movement

free software communitysoftware freedomopen source community
Raymond has had a number of public disputes with other figures in the free software movement.
After this, Eric Raymond and Bruce Perens founded the Open Source Initiative (OSI) to promote the term "open source software" as an alternative term for free software.

Gpsd

Raymond is currently the administrator of the project page for the Global Positioning System data tool gpsd.
It is now maintained by Eric S. Raymond.

Revolution OS

Directed by J. T. S. Moore, the film features interviews with prominent hackers and entrepreneurs including Richard Stallman, Michael Tiemann, Linus Torvalds, Larry Augustin, Eric S. Raymond, Bruce Perens, Frank Hecker and Brian Behlendorf.

The Battle for Wesnoth

Battle for WesnothWesnothBattle for Wesnoth, The
He has also contributed code and content to the free software video game The Battle for Wesnoth.
Developers of the game also include well-known authors from the free software and open source scene, like the co-founder of the Open Source Initiative and core Linux kernel developer Eric S. Raymond, or Linux kernel programmer Rusty Russell.

Halloween documents

confidential memobusiness strategyeighth Halloween document
Raymond named this document, together with others subsequently leaked, "the Halloween Documents".
Both the leaked documents and the responses were published by Eric S. Raymond in 1998.

The Magic Cauldron (essay)

The Magic CauldronThe Magic Cauldron" (essay)
"The Magic Cauldron" is an essay by Eric S. Raymond on the open-source economic model.

Release early, release often

community-releasesearly and oftenrapid release
This philosophy was popularized by Eric S. Raymond in his 1997 essay The Cathedral and the Bazaar, where Raymond stated "Release early. Release often. And listen to your customers".

Hacker ethic

Hackinghacker ethicsethical hacker
Eric S. Raymond identifies and explains this conceptual shift in The Cathedral and the Bazaar:

Defense Distributed

an unrelated project to produce a working firearm by 3D printing
He has endorsed the open source firearms organization Defense Distributed, calling them "friends of freedom" and writing "I approve of any development that makes it more difficult for governments and criminals to monopolize the use of force. As 3D printers become less expensive and more ubiquitous, this could be a major step in the right direction."
Open source software advocate Eric S. Raymond has endorsed the organization and its efforts, calling Defense Distributed "friends of freedom" and writing "I approve of any development that makes it more difficult for governments and criminals to monopolize the use of force. As 3D printers become less expensive and more ubiquitous, this could be a major step in the right direction."

Linucon

Notable guests included actor Wil Wheaton, Jay "Tron Guy" Maynard, game designer Steve Jackson, and Linux activist Eric S. Raymond.