Eric Sykes

Eric Sykes Shows a Few of Our Favourite ThingsSykes
Eric Sykes (4 May 1923 – 4 July 2012) was an English radio, stage, television and film writer, comedian, actor, and director whose performing career spanned more than 50 years.wikipedia
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Hattie Jacques

He became a TV star in his own right in the early 1960s when he appeared with Hattie Jacques in several popular BBC comedy television series. At the turn of the decade Eric Sykes and his old friend and colleague Hattie Jacques co-starred in a new 30-minute BBC TV sitcom, Sykes and a..., which Sykes created in collaboration with writer Johnny Speight, who had worked with him earlier in the 1950s on the two Tony Hancock series for ITV.
On television she had a long professional partnership with Eric Sykes, with whom she co-starred in his long-running series Sykes and Sykes and a....

The Goon Show

The GoonsGoon ShowGoon
Sykes first came to prominence through his many radio credits as a writer and actor in the 1950s, most notably through his collaboration on The Goon Show scripts.
The series was devised and written by Spike Milligan with the regular collaboration of other writers including Larry Stephens, Eric Sykes (who co-wrote most of the episodes in Series 5), Maurice Wiltshire and John Antrobus, initially under the supervision of Jimmy Grafton.

John Antrobus

Antrobus
He frequently wrote for and performed with many other leading comedy performers and writers of the period, including Tony Hancock, Spike Milligan, Tommy Cooper, Peter Sellers, John Antrobus, and Johnny Speight.
After leaving the Army, spending time also working as a supply teacher and waiter, Antrobus pursued a future writing comedy, and went to Associated London Scripts (ALS), the writers' co-operative set up by Spike Milligan and Eric Sykes.

Bill Fraser

Sykes's entertainment career began during the Second World War while serving in a Special Liaison Unit, when he met and worked with then Flight Lieutenant Bill Fraser.
Before the Second World War, he ran the Connaught Theatre in Worthing; when called up he served in a Royal Air Force Special Liaison Unit, reaching the rank of flight lieutenant, where he met and became friends with Eric Sykes.

Spike Milligan

Oblomov
He frequently wrote for and performed with many other leading comedy performers and writers of the period, including Tony Hancock, Spike Milligan, Tommy Cooper, Peter Sellers, John Antrobus, and Johnny Speight.
He was also the primary author of most of the scripts, although he co-wrote many scripts with various collaborators, most notably Larry Stephens and Eric Sykes.

Frankie Howerd

Frankie HowardThe Frankie Howerd ShowFrancis Alick "Frankie" Howerd
Sykes began providing scripts for both Fraser and Frankie Howerd and soon found himself in demand as a comedy writer.
His profile rose in the immediate postwar period (aided with material written by Eric Sykes, Galton and Simpson and Johnny Speight).

Peter Sellers

Monty CasinoPeter Richard Henry Sellers
He frequently wrote for and performed with many other leading comedy performers and writers of the period, including Tony Hancock, Spike Milligan, Tommy Cooper, Peter Sellers, John Antrobus, and Johnny Speight.
In 1954, Sellers was cast opposite Sid James, Tony Hancock, Raymond Huntley, Donald Pleasence and Eric Sykes in the British Lion Film Corporation comedy production, Orders Are Orders.

Associated London Scripts

(Sykes and Milligan later jointly formed Associated London Scripts (ALS) with Ray Galton and Alan Simpson, a writers' agency which lasted for well over a decade until being effectively dissolved in 1967).
This reportedly sufficiently distracted him from writing scripts so much that he accepted an invitation from Eric Sykes to share his small office above a grocer's shop at 130 Uxbridge Road, Shepherd's Bush.

Johnny Speight

He frequently wrote for and performed with many other leading comedy performers and writers of the period, including Tony Hancock, Spike Milligan, Tommy Cooper, Peter Sellers, John Antrobus, and Johnny Speight. At the turn of the decade Eric Sykes and his old friend and colleague Hattie Jacques co-starred in a new 30-minute BBC TV sitcom, Sykes and a..., which Sykes created in collaboration with writer Johnny Speight, who had worked with him earlier in the 1950s on the two Tony Hancock series for ITV.
He began contributing scripts to comedy shows in 1955, starting with Great Scott - It's Maynard! He later contributed to Sykes and a... (1960–65), which starred Eric Sykes, Hattie Jacques and Richard Wattis.

Denis Norden

Sykes also collaborated with fellow RAF servicemen Denis Norden and Ron Rich in the production of troop entertainment shows.
Whilst preparing for one of these shows in 1945, Norden, accompanied by fellow performers Eric Sykes and Ron Rich, went to a nearby prison camp in search of stage lighting; the camp turned out to be the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp, which had recently been liberated by the Allies.

Orders Are Orders

Sykes also made his first screen appearance at this time in the army film comedy Orders Are Orders (1954), which also featured Sid James, Tony Hancock, Peter Sellers, Bill Fraser, and Donald Pleasence.
Eric Sykes contributed to the script and appears in a minor role.

Max Bygraves

Walter William BygravesMax Bygraves OBE
During this year he also made his second film appearance, playing a minor role in the Max Bygraves film Charley Moon, which also featured Bill Fraser, Peter Jones, Dennis Price, and (as a child) Jane Asher.
He toured in a variety show with Frankie Howerd, who in turn introduced him to Eric Sykes, and they began writing routines together.

Galton and Simpson

Ray Galton and Alan SimpsonRay GaltonAlan Simpson
(Sykes and Milligan later jointly formed Associated London Scripts (ALS) with Ray Galton and Alan Simpson, a writers' agency which lasted for well over a decade until being effectively dissolved in 1967).
This writers' co-operative had been founded by Eric Sykes and Spike Milligan, with others involved, including Hancock for a time.

Tommy Cooper

Cooper, TommyJust Like That" (Tommy Cooper song)
He frequently wrote for and performed with many other leading comedy performers and writers of the period, including Tony Hancock, Spike Milligan, Tommy Cooper, Peter Sellers, John Antrobus, and Johnny Speight. In 1967, Sykes expanded one of his routines into a 45-minute wordless colour short, The Plank which features, among others, Sykes, Tommy Cooper, Jimmy Edwards, Graham Stark, Hattie Jacques, and future Goodies star Bill Oddie.
He did continue to appear as a guest on other television shows, however, and worked with Eric Sykes on two Thames productions in 1982.

Sykes and a...

At the turn of the decade Eric Sykes and his old friend and colleague Hattie Jacques co-starred in a new 30-minute BBC TV sitcom, Sykes and a..., which Sykes created in collaboration with writer Johnny Speight, who had worked with him earlier in the 1950s on the two Tony Hancock series for ITV.
Sykes and a... is a black-and-white British sitcom starring Eric Sykes and Hattie Jacques that aired on BBC 1 from 1960 to 1965.

Village of Daughters

In 1962, Sykes played his first starring film role, being a travelling salesman in the comedy Village of Daughters, set in an Italian village, but featuring a mostly British cast including John Le Mesurier (who was at that time married to Hattie Jacques), and Roger Delgado.
Village of Daughters is a 1962 British comedy film directed by George Pollock and starring Eric Sykes, Scilla Gabel, John Le Mesurier, Grégoire Aslan, Graham Stark, and Warren Mitchell.

The Plank (1967 film)

The Plank1967The Plank'' (1967 film)
In 1967, Sykes expanded one of his routines into a 45-minute wordless colour short, The Plank which features, among others, Sykes, Tommy Cooper, Jimmy Edwards, Graham Stark, Hattie Jacques, and future Goodies star Bill Oddie.
It was written and directed by Eric Sykes, and produced by Jon Penington.

Earl's Court

Earls CourtFinborough RoadEarls Court Road
Later that year he wrote and appeared in another all-star spectacular called Opening Night which celebrated the opening of the 1956 National Radio Show at Earl's Court.

The Liquidator (1965 film)

The Liquidatorfeature film of the same nameinto a film of the same name
The spy spoof The Liquidator was directed by Jack Cardiff and starred Rod Taylor with Sykes in a secondary role.
Unable to resign and not a killer himself, Boysie secretly hires a freelance professional assassin (Eric Sykes) to do the dirty work.

The Idiot Weekly, Price 2d

In 1956, Sykes performed, wrote scripts, and acted as script editor for the pioneering Rediffusion TV comedy The Idiot Weekly, Price 2d, the first attempt to translate the humour of the Goons to television.
Eric Sykes was credited as the script editor.

Christmas Night with the Stars

Nine short seasons of Sykes and a... were made between 1960 and 1965, ranging between six and nine episodes each, plus a short 1962 special in the BBC's annual Christmas Night with the Stars programme, now lost.

Rotten to the Core (film)

Rotten to the CoreRotten to the Core'' (film)
His third film of that year was the Boulting brothers' Rotten to the Core starring Anton Rodgers (who replaced Peter Sellers) with Sykes.
Eric Sykes plays a policeman who attempts to go undercover without much success.

Variety Bandbox

BrandboxVariety Band-Box
Forming a partnership with Sid Colin, he worked on the BBC radio ventriloquism show Educating Archie, which began in 1950, and also Variety Bandbox.
Although not a performer on Variety Bandbox, Eric Sykes cut his comedy teeth as a scriptwriter on the show.

Kill or Cure (1962 film)

Kill or CureKill or Cure'' (1962 film)
This was followed by a supporting role in the MGM British comedy, Kill or Cure, starring Terry-Thomas with a cast of British comedy stalwarts including one of the first film appearances by Ronnie Barker.

The Plank (1979 film)

The PlankThe Plank'' (1979 film)1979
(The film was later remade for Thames Television in 1978.) Also in 1967, Sykes and his old friend Jimmy Edwards started touring with the theatrical farce Big Bad Mouse which, while keeping more or less to a script, gave them rein to ad lib and address the audience.
The Plank is a 30-minute, British slapstick comedy film for television from 1979, which was written and directed by Eric Sykes.