Erich von Falkenhayn

FalkenhaynErich Falkenhaynvon FalkenhaynGeneral von FalkenhaynErich (1861–1922)Field Marshal von FalkenhaynGeneral Falkenhaynvon Falkenhayn, Kriegsminister
General Erich Georg Sebastian Anton von Falkenhayn (11 September 1861 – 8 April 1922) was the Chief of the German General Staff during the First World War from September 1914 until 29 August 1916.wikipedia
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Battle of Verdun

VerdunVerdun 1916First Offensive Battle of Verdun
He was removed in the late summer of 1916 after the failure at the Battle of Verdun, the opening of the Allied offensive on the Somme, the Brusilov Offensive and the entry of Romania into the war. Eventually, in the hope that either a massive slaughter would lead Europe's political leaders to consider ending the war or that losses would be less harmful for Germany than for France, Falkenhayn staged a battle of attrition, as claimed in his post-war memoirs, in the Battle of Verdun in early 1916.
According to his memoirs written after the war, the Chief of the German General Staff, Erich von Falkenhayn, believed that although victory might no longer be achieved by a decisive battle, the French army could still be defeated if it suffered a sufficient number of casualties.

General of the Infantry (Germany)

General der InfanterieGeneral of the InfantryGeneral
General Erich Georg Sebastian Anton von Falkenhayn (11 September 1861 – 8 April 1922) was the Chief of the German General Staff during the First World War from September 1914 until 29 August 1916.

Paul von Hindenburg

HindenburgPresident Hindenburgvon Hindenburg
His reputation as a war leader was attacked in Germany during and after the war, especially by the faction which supported Paul von Hindenburg. This brought him into conflict with Paul von Hindenburg and Erich Ludendorff, who favored massive offensives in the east.
To counter this threat, the supreme commander and Prussian War Minister Erich von Falkenhayn, who had superseded Moltke, formed a new Ninth Army, which joined Hindenburg's command.

Battle of the Somme

SommeSomme Offensivethe Somme
He was removed in the late summer of 1916 after the failure at the Battle of Verdun, the opening of the Allied offensive on the Somme, the Brusilov Offensive and the entry of Romania into the war.
The Chief of the German General Staff, Erich von Falkenhayn, intended to end the war by splitting the Anglo-French Entente in 1916, before its material superiority became unbeatable.

Eugen von Falkenhayn

Eugen (1853–1934)
His brother Arthur (1857–1929) became tutor of Crown Prince Wilhelm while Eugen (1853–1934) became a Prussian General of Cavalry.
His brother Arthur (1857–1929) became tutor of Crown Prince Wilhelm while Erich (1861–1922), became Prussian minister of war and chief of the German General Staff.

Theobald von Bethmann-Hollweg

Theobald von Bethmann HollwegBethmann-HollwegBethmann Hollweg
Falkenhayn's relations with the Chancellor Bethmann-Hollweg were troubled and undercut Falkenhayn's plans.
When War Minister Erich von Falkenhayn wanted to mobilise for war on 29 July, Bethmann was still against it but used his veto to prevent the Reichstag debating it.

Fedor von Bock

von BockFeodor von BockBock
His only sister Olga von Falkenhayn was the mother of Fieldmarshall Fedor von Bock.
His mother, Olga Helene Franziska von Falkenhayn, was the sister of Erich von Falkenhayn, Chief of the German General Staff during the First World War.

World War I

First World WarGreat WarWorld War One
General Erich Georg Sebastian Anton von Falkenhayn (11 September 1861 – 8 April 1922) was the Chief of the German General Staff during the First World War from September 1914 until 29 August 1916.
About this time, Friedrich Freiherr Kress von Kressenstein was relieved of his duties as the Eighth Army's commander, replaced by Djevad Pasha, and a few months later the commander of the Ottoman Army in Palestine, Erich von Falkenhayn, was replaced by Otto Liman von Sanders.

German Army (German Empire)

German ArmyImperial German ArmyArmy
Becoming a cadet at the age of 11, he joined the Army in 1880.

German General Staff

General StaffChief of the General StaffGeneralstab
General Erich Georg Sebastian Anton von Falkenhayn (11 September 1861 – 8 April 1922) was the Chief of the German General Staff during the First World War from September 1914 until 29 August 1916. Falkenhayn succeeded Helmuth von Moltke the Younger as Chief of the Oberste Heeresleitung (German General Staff) after the First Battle of the Marne on 14 September 1914.
Soon Moltke was replaced by Erich von Falkenhayn who was already the Prussian war minister.

Race to the Sea

Race for the SeaadvancingARMENTIERES 1914
Falkenhayn attempted to outflank the British and French in the Race to the Sea, a series of engagements throughout northern France and Belgium in which each side made reciprocal attempts to turn the other's flank, until they reached the North Sea and had no more room for manoeuvre.
Erich von Falkenhayn, Chief of the German General Staff (Oberste Heeresleitung OHL) since 14 September, concluded that a decisive victory could not be achieved on the Western Front and that it was equally unlikely in the east.

Brusilov Offensive

another Russian offensiveattackedBrusilov
He was removed in the late summer of 1916 after the failure at the Battle of Verdun, the opening of the Allied offensive on the Somme, the Brusilov Offensive and the entry of Romania into the war.
In a meeting held on the same day Lutsk fell, German Chief of Staff Erich von Falkenhayn persuaded his Austrian counterpart Franz Conrad von Hötzendorf to pull troops away from the Italian Front to counter the Russians in Galicia.

Białochowo

Burg Belchau
Falkenhayn was born in Burg Belchau near Graudenz, West Prussia (now Białochowo, Poland) to Fedor von Falkenhayn (1814–1896) and Franziska von Falkenhayn, née von Rosenberg (1826–1888).

First Battle of Ypres

Ypres 1914YpresGheluvelt
The British and French eventually stopped the German advance at the First Battle of Ypres (October–November 1914).
General Erich von Falkenhayn, head of the Oberste Heeresleitung (OHL, German General Staff), then tried a limited offensive to capture Ypres and Mont Kemmel, from 19 October to 22 November.

Attrition warfare

war of attritionattritionbattle of attrition
Eventually, in the hope that either a massive slaughter would lead Europe's political leaders to consider ending the war or that losses would be less harmful for Germany than for France, Falkenhayn staged a battle of attrition, as claimed in his post-war memoirs, in the Battle of Verdun in early 1916.
Erich von Falkenhayn later claimed that his tactics at Verdun were designed not to take the city but rather to destroy the French Army in its defense.

Oberste Heeresleitung

German High CommandSupreme Army CommandOHL
Falkenhayn succeeded Helmuth von Moltke the Younger as Chief of the Oberste Heeresleitung (German General Staff) after the First Battle of the Marne on 14 September 1914.
Moltke was replaced by the Prussian Minister of War, Lieutenant General Erich von Falkenhayn, first informally in September and then officially on 25 October 1914.

Yildirim Army Group

Yıldırım Army GroupHeeresgruppe'' FYildirim Troops Inspectorate
Following the success, in mid-July 1917 Falkenhayn went to take military command of the Ottoman Yildirim Army Group (Heeresgruppe F, Army Group F), which was being formed in Mesopotamia and at Aleppo.
Starting in June 1917, the Yildirim Army Group's first commander in chief was the former Prussian Minister of War and Chief of Staff Erich von Falkenhayn.

Romania during World War I

Romanian CampaignRomanian FrontWorld War I
He was removed in the late summer of 1916 after the failure at the Battle of Verdun, the opening of the Allied offensive on the Somme, the Brusilov Offensive and the entry of Romania into the war. Falkenhayn then assumed command of the 9th Army in Transylvania (6 September 1916) and in August launched a joint offensive against Romania with August von Mackensen.
Meanwhile, the German Chief of Staff, General Erich von Falkenhayn, had correctly reasoned that Romania would side with the Allies, and had made plans accordingly.

Helmuth von Moltke the Younger

Helmuth von MoltkeMoltkeGeneral von Moltke
Falkenhayn succeeded Helmuth von Moltke the Younger as Chief of the Oberste Heeresleitung (German General Staff) after the First Battle of the Marne on 14 September 1914.
Moltke's health, already stressed from this argument with his ruler, broke down as a consequence of German defeat at the first battle of the Marne, and on 14 September 1914, he was succeeded by Erich von Falkenhayn.

Erich Ludendorff

LudendorffGeneral LudendorffGeneral Erich Ludendorff
This brought him into conflict with Paul von Hindenburg and Erich Ludendorff, who favored massive offensives in the east.
Erich von Falkenhayn, supreme commander at OHL, came east to attack the flank of the Russian army that was pushing through the Carpathian passes towards Hungary.

August von Mackensen

Mackensenvon MackensenAnton Ludwig August von Mackensen
Falkenhayn then assumed command of the 9th Army in Transylvania (6 September 1916) and in August launched a joint offensive against Romania with August von Mackensen.
In response to desperate pleas the German supreme commander Erich von Falkenhayn agreed to an offensive against the Russian flank by an Austro-German Army under a German commander.

Henning von Tresckow

Colonel Henning von Tresckow
In 1886 Falkenhayn married Ida Selkmann, with whom he had a son Fritz Georg Adalbert von Falkenhayn (1890–1973) and a daughter Erika Karola Olga von Falkenhayn (1904–1975) who married Henning von Tresckow (1901–1944), the officer who organised the plot of 20 July 1944 to assassinate Hitler.
In 1926, he married Erika von Falkenhayn, only daughter of Erich von Falkenhayn, the chief of the General Staff from 1914 to 1916, and returned to military service, being sponsored by Field Marshal Paul von Hindenburg.

First Battle of the Marne

Battle of the MarneMarne 1914Marne
Falkenhayn succeeded Helmuth von Moltke the Younger as Chief of the Oberste Heeresleitung (German General Staff) after the First Battle of the Marne on 14 September 1914.
Joffre ordered the French Second Army to move to the north of the French Sixth Army, by moving from eastern France from 2–9 September and Falkenhayn who had replaced Moltke on 14 September, ordered the German 6th Army to move from the German-French border to the northern flank on 17 September.

Sinai and Palestine campaign

PalestinePalestine CampaignEgypt
He failed to prevent the British under General Edmund Allenby from conquering Jerusalem in December 1917.
The Yildirim Army Group (also known as Thunderbolt Army Group and Army Group F) was established in June, commanded by the German Empire General Erich von Falkenhayn.

10th Army (German Empire)

10th ArmyTenth Army10th German Army
In February 1918, Falkenhayn became commander of the 10th Army in Belarus, where he witnessed the end of the war.