Erie Canal map c. 1840
Aqueduct over the Mohawk River at Rexford, one of 32 navigable aqueducts on the Erie Canal
View of the Boulevard c. 1908
The Mohawk Valley, running east and west, cuts a natural pathway (water gap) between the Catskill Mountains to the south and the Adirondack Mountains to the north.
Syracuse's weather averages
Profile of the original canal
Skyline from northwest, showing downtown at left to Syracuse University's Carrier Dome at right
Operations at Lockport, New York, in 1839
State University of New York Upstate Medical University (above); Upstate is ranked No. 35 Best Large Employer in America by Forbes.
Stonework of lock abandoned because of route change, at Durhamville, New York
Upstate Children's Hospital at Upstate Medical University
An original five-step lock structure crossing the Niagara Escarpment at Lockport, now without gates and used as a cascade for excess water
State Tower Building on Clinton Square
Erie Canal lock in Lockport, New York
The 26 Syracuse neighborhoods
1853 map of New York canals emboldened, center: the Erie Canal; other lines: railroads, rivers and county borders
Syracuse University's Crouse College
Lithograph of the Erie Canal at Lockport, New York c. 1855. Published for Herrman J. Meyer, 164 William Street, New York City.
The Niagara Mohawk Building (now owned by National Grid USA), an example of art deco, listed in 2010 on the National Register of Historic Places
Aqueduct over Nine Mile Creek north of Camillus, New York, built in 1841 and abandoned c. 1918; one of 32 navigable aqueducts on the Erie Canal, it has since been restored.
Everson Museum of Art
Upstream view of the downstream lock at Lock 32, Pittsford, New York
Syracuse's four interstate highways link the city with its suburbs and other cities throughout the country.
Map of the "Water Level Routes" of the New York Central Railroad (purple), West Shore Railroad (red) and Erie Canal (blue)
The flag of Syracuse flies over Clinton Square
Rochester, New York, aqueduct c. 1890
Syracuse City Hall
Two "low" lift bridges in Lockport, New York, July 2010
County Courthouse at Columbus Circle
The modern Erie Canal has 34 locks, which are painted with the blue and gold colors of the New York State Canal System.
Patch of the Syracuse Fire Department
Gateway Harbor in North Tonawanda, about 1000 ft from the present-day western terminus of the Erie Canal where it connects to the Niagara River
NBT Bank Stadium is home to the Syracuse Mets baseball team.
The Old Erie Canal and its towpath at Kirkville, New York, within Old Erie Canal State Historic Park
Syracuse University's football team plays its games in the JMA Dome.
Buffalo's Erie Canal Commercial Slip in Spring 2008
alt=|Historic Clinton Square
Erie Canal Lock 18, Cohoes, New York
alt=|Erie Canal in Syracuse
Old Erie Canal State Historic Park, DeWitt, New York
alt=|Salina Street
The modern single lock at the Niagara Escarpment
alt=|Fayette Street
alt=|Onondaga Creekwalk
alt=|Green Lakes State Park
alt=|Green Lakes State Park
alt=|Winter in Syracuse
alt=|Basilica of the Sacred Heart of Jesus
alt=|Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception
alt=|Assumption Church
alt=|St. John the Baptist Greek Catholic Church
alt=|First Baptist Church
alt=|Saint Paul's Episcopal Cathedral
Armory Square
alt=|Columbus Circle, Syracuse, NY
alt=|Franklin Square, Syracuse
Franklin Square
alt=|Buildings in Downtown
alt=|Gere Bank Building
alt=|Hotel Syracuse Downtown
alt=|South Salina Street Downtown Historic District
alt=|South Salina Street Downtown Historic District
alt=|The Amos Block building in downtown
alt=|Syracuse University
alt=|Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs
alt=|Syracuse University
alt=|Joe Biden speaking at Syracuse University
alt=|Upstate Medical University
alt=|Upper Onondaga Park in Strathmore
alt=|Inner harbor at Onondaga Lake
alt=|Onondaga Lake Park
alt=|Skaneateles lake

Completed in 1825, it was the second-longest canal in the world (after the Grand Canal in China) and greatly enhanced the development and economy of many major cities of New York, including New York City, Albany, Syracuse, Rochester and Buffalo, as well as the United States.

- Erie Canal

Historically, the city has functioned as a major crossroads over the last two centuries, first between the Erie Canal and its branch canals, then of the railway network.

- Syracuse, New York

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Utica, New York

City in the Mohawk Valley and the county seat of Oneida County, New York, United States.

City in the Mohawk Valley and the county seat of Oneida County, New York, United States.

An 1802 engraved map of Utica. The Mohawk River is at the top, and Bagg's Tavern is at the center right.
This 1883 index map shows the development around Utica and Bagg's Square, with the Erie Canal (now Oriskany Street) and Chenango Canal towards the upper-right.
Bird's-eye view of Utica over Bagg's Square in the 1850s, showing the smoke from numerous factory chimneys
Newsboys for the Utica Saturday Globe, 1910
Looking north towards the corner of Genesee and Bleecker streets, c. 1900–1915. Streetcars can be seen crossing a bridge over the Erie Canal.
November 1985 photo of the Mohawk Valley from Space Shuttle Challenger, with Utica center-left and Albany center-right
The Utica Marsh is a series of wetlands north of the city
Utica as viewed from the northern hills of the city
A CSX train sharing Schuyler Street in West Utica
The Bosnian Islamic Association of Utica's mosque near City Hall.
Fermentation tanks at the Matt Brewing Company in West Utica, producer of Saranac beer
Participants in Utica's annual Boilermaker Road Race
A skillet of Utica greens
Roscoe Conkling Park
NY Routes 5, 8, and 12 cut through the city as the North–South Arterial Highway.
Early Federal Highway Administration map of the Interstate Highway System in Utica; Interstates 90 and 790 are in the shaded portion
Aerial view of SUNY Polytechnic Institute from south to north
Thomas R. Proctor High School
Adirondack Bank Center after renovations, 2016

Located on the Mohawk River at the foot of the Adirondack Mountains, it is approximately 95 mi west-northwest of Albany, 55 mi east of Syracuse and 240 mi northwest of New York City.

In the 19th century, immigrants strengthened its position as a layover city between Albany and Syracuse on the Erie and Chenango Canals and the New York Central Railroad.

Rochester, New York

City in the U.S. state of New York, the seat of Monroe County, and the fourth-most populous in the state after New York City, Buffalo, and Yonkers with a population of 211,328 in 2020.

City in the U.S. state of New York, the seat of Monroe County, and the fourth-most populous in the state after New York City, Buffalo, and Yonkers with a population of 211,328 in 2020.

Rochester in the late 1930s
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Genesee River and the historic Aqueduct Downtown
Kodak is headquartered in Rochester.
Rush Rhees Library at the University of Rochester, the largest employer in the six-county metropolitan area
A white hot Garbage Plate from Nick Tahou Hots
Nazareth College
Murphy's Law, a large, iconic bar and club at the corner of East & Alexander in the East End
The Little Theatre in the East End
Monroe Avenue bars at night
Former Federal Building, now Rochester City Hall since the 1970s
Circle at Bausch & Lomb headquarters with the Xerox Tower in the background
Former City Hall in the City Hall Historic District
Colgate Rochester Crozer Divinity School
Geva Theatre Center downtown
Frontier Field, including the Rochester skyline
Marina Auto Stadium
Packet boats on the Genesee River
Aerial View of the Greater Rochester International Airport
Louise M. Slaughter Rochester Station
The Broad Street Aqueduct was used as a subway tunnel.
Main Street looking east
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Center City and the Frederick Douglass–Susan B. Anthony Memorial Bridge
Townhouses in Corn Hill
Oxford Street Houses
Park and Oxford
Apartments in Rochester's East End
Houses on Park Avenue
An aerial image of the city of Rochester taken in August 2007
Morey Hall
Wilson Commons
Rush Rhees Library
Lattimore
Laser Energetics Lab
Eastman School
Entrance to the George Eastman Museum
Gardens at the Eastman Museum
Strong National Museum of Play
The Rochester Memorial Art Gallery
Eastman Theater
Sacred Heart Cathedral, seat of the Rochester Diocese
Rundel Memorial Library
Genesee Valley Park
Ontario Beach
Meadows in Highland Park, designed by Frederick Law Olmsted
Lions at the Seneca Park Zoo
Mt Hope Cemetery (Infrared)
Mt. Hope Cemetery
Hamlin Beach state park on Lake Ontario north of the city

Also in 1823, the Erie Canal aqueduct over the Genesee River was completed, and the Erie Canal east to the Hudson River was opened.

The city is about 73 mi east-northeast of Buffalo and about 87 mi west of Syracuse.

View north along the thruway in Ramapo

New York State Thruway

System of controlled-access highways spanning 569.83 mi within the U.S. state of New York.

System of controlled-access highways spanning 569.83 mi within the U.S. state of New York.

View north along the thruway in Ramapo
Tappan Zee Bridge (I-87 and I-287)
The New York State Thruway (I-87) looking east from Nordkop Mountain in Suffern
I-90, part of the New York State Thruway, looking east near Syracuse
Advance signage for exit 45 (I-490)
NYS Thruway near Silver Creek
Original Tappan Zee Bridge
In the late 1970s, NYSTA experimented with all-metric signage in the Syracuse area, such as these signs at exit 35.
All of I-90 within New York is designated as the "AMVETS Memorial Highway", as indicated by this sign at the Port Byron service area.
A former New York State Thruway toll ticket obtained at exit 25A
Approaching the Williamsville toll barrier on I-90 / Thruway westbound. This toll plaza is now removed and replaced with the electronic tolls on the Thruway

The 496.00 mi mainline is a toll road that extends from the New York City line at Yonkers to the Pennsylvania state line at Ripley by way of I-87 and I-90 through Albany, Syracuse, and Buffalo.

From exit 26 west to Utica, the mainline of the Thruway parallels the Erie Canal and the Mohawk River, crossing over the water-bodies at Mohawk.

The Fulton Chain Lakes (4th Lake) in the Adirondack Park from Bald Mountain

Upstate New York

Geographic region consisting of the portion of New York State lying north of the New York City metropolitan area.

Geographic region consisting of the portion of New York State lying north of the New York City metropolitan area.

The Fulton Chain Lakes (4th Lake) in the Adirondack Park from Bald Mountain
New York City is highlighted in red; "Upstate" refers to some or all of the area north and west of the city.
The Bear Mountain Bridge across the Hudson River, as seen from Bear Mountain. It connects the northern parts of Westchester and Rockland counties, considered by some to be the southeastern edge of Upstate.
The opening ceremony at Woodstock
Ethnic ancestries across the United States
Whiteface Mountain in the Adirondacks
Canisteo River Valley in the Allegheny Plateau
Mean annual snowfall (in inches) for Upstate New York, using 1991-2020 climate normals. Snowfall is especially prevalent within the lake-effect snowbelts of western and north central New York.
A traditional Iroquois longhouse
Cherry Valley massacre
A 1816 engraving of the Battle of Plattsburgh
Erie Canal at Lockport, New York, in 1839
Harvard Mark I, one of the earliest computers, made by IBM in Endicott
Baseball Hall of Fame
Fort Stanwix
Boldt Castle in the Thousand Islands
NASCAR Cup Series at Watkins Glen
Economic regions of New York, showing approximate location of several upstate subregions

Major cities across Upstate New York from east to west include Albany, Utica, Binghamton, Syracuse, Rochester, and Buffalo.

The 1825 opening of the Erie Canal across Upstate New York transformed the economy of the region and the state.

Salina, New York

Town in Onondaga County, New York, United States.

Town in Onondaga County, New York, United States.

Salina is a northwestern suburb of the city of Syracuse.

Salina's location on the Erie Canal stimulated its industrial development.

Onondaga Lake

Onondaga watershed
Onondaga Lake motor boat ride by moonlight about 1907
Salt Wells at Syracuse, New York c. 1900
Long Branch Park in Liverpool, New York c. 1900
Onondaga Lake Park, in the northern suburbs of Syracuse, attracts over one million visitors each year
Outlet on the shores of Onondaga Lake in Liverpool, New York about 1900
The Salt Museum in 2015
Sailboating on the lake in 1907
Solvay Process Company in Solvay, New York on Onondaga Lake about 1900
Onondaga Lake outside Syracuse, New York in the moonlight about 1900

Onondaga Lake is a lake in Central New York, immediately northwest of and adjacent to Syracuse, New York.

The completion of the Erie Canal through New York state in the mid 1820s and the commercial production of salt brought an increase in settlement of the area.

New York Central Railroad

Railroad primarily operating in the Great Lakes and Mid-Atlantic regions of the United States.

Railroad primarily operating in the Great Lakes and Mid-Atlantic regions of the United States.

The main concourse of Grand Central Terminal, New York Central's most notable landmark
The former New York Central headquarters on Park Avenue is today known as the Helmsley Building
Map of the Water Level Routes of the New York Central Railroad (purple), West Shore Railroad (red) and Erie Canal (blue)
Bond of the New York Central Rail Road Company, issued 1 August 1853, signed by Erastus Corning
A New York Central train running on the High Line through the Bell Laboratories Building, 1936
The streamlined steam-powered 20th Century Limited departs Chicago's LaSalle Street Station behind a NYC Hudson locomotive, 1938
A full steam-powered NYC Mercury train, 1936
1936 postcard photograph of the Rexall Train

The railroad primarily connected greater New York and Boston in the east with Chicago and St. Louis in the Midwest, along with the intermediate cities of Albany, Buffalo, Cleveland, Cincinnati, Detroit, and Syracuse.

It was chartered in 1826 to connect the Mohawk River at Schenectady to the Hudson River at Albany, providing a way for freight and especially passengers to avoid the extensive and time-consuming locks on the Erie Canal between Schenectady and Albany.

Satellite view. Lake Ontario is at top, Oneida Lake upper right, Cazenovia Lake directly below Oneida.

Finger Lakes

Area called the Finger Lakes region in New York, in the United States.

Area called the Finger Lakes region in New York, in the United States.

Satellite view. Lake Ontario is at top, Oneida Lake upper right, Cazenovia Lake directly below Oneida.
Map of the Finger Lakes
The Finger Lakes are in the center bottom of this west facing image; Lake Erie (upper left), Lake Huron (upper right), and Lake Ontario (lower right) are three of the Great Lakes
Seneca Lake, from South Main Street in Geneva, New York.
Bluff Point on Keuka Lake
Granger Homestead, Canandaigua
Canadice Lake is surrounded by the Hemlock–Canadice State Forest.
Hemlock Lake, one of the western Finger Lakes
Sunrise overlooking a vineyard on Canandaigua Lake
Wells College, Aurora

DeRuyter Reservoir, sometimes called Tioughnioga Lake or DeRuyter Lake, a man-made Finger Lake southwest of Cazenovia Lake on Limestone Creek, is 8 miles from the northernmost point on the Finger Lakes Trail, but was built as a feeder reservoir for the Erie Canal.

Oneida Lake, to the northeast of Syracuse, is sometimes included as the "thumb", although it is shallow and somewhat different in character from the rest.

Oswego, New York

City in Oswego County, New York, United States.

City in Oswego County, New York, United States.

Fort Oswego 1756
Attack on Oswego, War of 1812
The walls of Fort Ontario
Oswego River flowing into Lake Ontario
Recreational fishing at Oswego, c. 1900.

Oswego was incorporated as a village on March 14, 1828, and the Oswego Canal, a branch of the Erie Canal, reached the area in 1829.

Into the mid-1940s the DLW had daily passenger service from Hoboken, through Binghamton, to Syracuse and ending in Oswego.

Syracuse Standard logo, January 3, 1884

The Post-Standard

Syracuse Standard logo, January 3, 1884

The Post-Standard is a newspaper serving the greater Syracuse, New York, metro area.

Other investigations have focused on the allocation of state-borrowed money by the leaders of the State Senate and Assembly; and on controversy over the secretive sale of public lands along the Erie Canal by the New York State Canal Corporation for less than the land's market value.