A report on Erie Canal

Erie Canal map c. 1840
Aqueduct over the Mohawk River at Rexford, one of 32 navigable aqueducts on the Erie Canal
The Mohawk Valley, running east and west, cuts a natural pathway (water gap) between the Catskill Mountains to the south and the Adirondack Mountains to the north.
Profile of the original canal
Operations at Lockport, New York, in 1839
Stonework of lock abandoned because of route change, at Durhamville, New York
An original five-step lock structure crossing the Niagara Escarpment at Lockport, now without gates and used as a cascade for excess water
Erie Canal lock in Lockport, New York
1853 map of New York canals emboldened, center: the Erie Canal; other lines: railroads, rivers and county borders
Lithograph of the Erie Canal at Lockport, New York c. 1855. Published for Herrman J. Meyer, 164 William Street, New York City.
Aqueduct over Nine Mile Creek north of Camillus, New York, built in 1841 and abandoned c. 1918; one of 32 navigable aqueducts on the Erie Canal, it has since been restored.
Upstream view of the downstream lock at Lock 32, Pittsford, New York
Map of the "Water Level Routes" of the New York Central Railroad (purple), West Shore Railroad (red) and Erie Canal (blue)
Rochester, New York, aqueduct c. 1890
Two "low" lift bridges in Lockport, New York, July 2010
The modern Erie Canal has 34 locks, which are painted with the blue and gold colors of the New York State Canal System.
Gateway Harbor in North Tonawanda, about 1000 ft from the present-day western terminus of the Erie Canal where it connects to the Niagara River
The Old Erie Canal and its towpath at Kirkville, New York, within Old Erie Canal State Historic Park
Buffalo's Erie Canal Commercial Slip in Spring 2008
Erie Canal Lock 18, Cohoes, New York
Old Erie Canal State Historic Park, DeWitt, New York
The modern single lock at the Niagara Escarpment

Historic canal in upstate New York that runs east-west between the Hudson River and Lake Erie.

- Erie Canal

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Satellite image of the Great Lakes, April 24, 2000

Great Lakes

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The Great Lakes, also called the Great Lakes of North America or the Laurentian Great Lakes, are a series of large interconnected freshwater lakes with certain sea-like characteristics in the mid-east region of North America that connect to the Atlantic Ocean via the Saint Lawrence River.

The Great Lakes, also called the Great Lakes of North America or the Laurentian Great Lakes, are a series of large interconnected freshwater lakes with certain sea-like characteristics in the mid-east region of North America that connect to the Atlantic Ocean via the Saint Lawrence River.

Satellite image of the Great Lakes, April 24, 2000
Terra MODIS image of the Great Lakes, January 27, 2005, showing ice beginning to build up around the shores of each of the lakes, with snow on the ground; Green Bay, the North Channel, Saginaw Bay, and Lake St. Clair show complete ice coverage.
Location in North America
A map of the Great Lakes Basin showing the five sub-basins. Left to right they are: Superior (magenta); Michigan (cyan); Huron (green); Erie (yellow); Ontario (orange-red).
Lake Michigan–Huron with north oriented to the right; taken on April 14, 2022 during Expedition 67 of the International Space Station. Green Bay is at the upper left and Saginaw Bay is on the right.
South Bass Island in Lake Erie
Toronto on Lake Ontario is in the eastern section of the Great Lakes Megalopolis
Water levels of Lakes Michigan and Huron in the United States, 1918 to 2019.
The Great Lakes, as photographed from the International Space Station
A diagram of the formation of the Great Lakes
Map of Glacial Lake Algonquin and its Correlatives (USGS 1915)
The location of common lake effect bands on the Great Lakes
Lake sturgeon, the largest native fish in the Great Lakes and the subject of extensive commercial fishing in the 19th and 20th centuries is listed as a threatened species
Cliffs at Palisade Head on Lake Superior in Minnesota near Silver Bay.
A zebra mussel–encrusted vector-averaging current meter from Lake Michigan.
Diatoms of different sizes seen through the microscope. These minuscule phytoplankton are encased within a silicate cell wall.
A woodcut of Le Griffon
The passenger ship (foreground) leaving Chicago, c. 1909
Photograph of Lakes Ontario, Erie and Huron plus the Finger Lakes of upstate New York, June 14, 2012, taken aboard the International Space Station, with lake names added
Escanaba's Ludington Park in Michigan
Various national, state, provincial, and municipal jurisdictions govern the Great Lakes
Satellite image of the Great Lakes taken by the Terra satellite on June 16, 2021
Chicago on Lake Michigan is in the western part of the lakes megalopolis and the site of the waterway linking the lakes to the Mississippi River valley
Detroit on the Detroit River links the region's central metropolitan areas

Pleasure boats can enter or exit the Great Lakes by way of the Erie Canal and Hudson River in New York.

Rochester, New York

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City in the U.S. state of New York, the seat of Monroe County, and the fourth-most populous in the state after New York City, Buffalo, and Yonkers with a population of 211,328 in 2020.

City in the U.S. state of New York, the seat of Monroe County, and the fourth-most populous in the state after New York City, Buffalo, and Yonkers with a population of 211,328 in 2020.

Rochester in the late 1930s
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Genesee River and the historic Aqueduct Downtown
Kodak is headquartered in Rochester.
Rush Rhees Library at the University of Rochester, the largest employer in the six-county metropolitan area
A white hot Garbage Plate from Nick Tahou Hots
Nazareth College
Murphy's Law, a large, iconic bar and club at the corner of East & Alexander in the East End
The Little Theatre in the East End
Monroe Avenue bars at night
Former Federal Building, now Rochester City Hall since the 1970s
Circle at Bausch & Lomb headquarters with the Xerox Tower in the background
Former City Hall in the City Hall Historic District
Colgate Rochester Crozer Divinity School
Geva Theatre Center downtown
Frontier Field, including the Rochester skyline
Marina Auto Stadium
Packet boats on the Genesee River
Aerial View of the Greater Rochester International Airport
Louise M. Slaughter Rochester Station
The Broad Street Aqueduct was used as a subway tunnel.
Main Street looking east
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Center City and the Frederick Douglass–Susan B. Anthony Memorial Bridge
Townhouses in Corn Hill
Oxford Street Houses
Park and Oxford
Apartments in Rochester's East End
Houses on Park Avenue
An aerial image of the city of Rochester taken in August 2007
Morey Hall
Wilson Commons
Rush Rhees Library
Lattimore
Laser Energetics Lab
Eastman School
Entrance to the George Eastman Museum
Gardens at the Eastman Museum
Strong National Museum of Play
The Rochester Memorial Art Gallery
Eastman Theater
Sacred Heart Cathedral, seat of the Rochester Diocese
Rundel Memorial Library
Genesee Valley Park
Ontario Beach
Meadows in Highland Park, designed by Frederick Law Olmsted
Lions at the Seneca Park Zoo
Mt Hope Cemetery (Infrared)
Mt. Hope Cemetery
Hamlin Beach state park on Lake Ontario north of the city

Also in 1823, the Erie Canal aqueduct over the Genesee River was completed, and the Erie Canal east to the Hudson River was opened.

Schenectady, New York

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City in Schenectady County, New York, United States, of which it is the county seat.

City in Schenectady County, New York, United States, of which it is the county seat.

Perspective map of Schenectady from 1882
Former GE headquarters building
Schenectady station, rebuilt in 2018
Proctor's Theatre
A concertina-playing guide welcomes visitors to a restored Dutch home in the Schenectady Stockade District.
Schenectady City Hall
Fire engine in Schenectady

Connected to the west by the Mohawk River and Erie Canal, Schenectady developed rapidly in the 19th century as part of the Mohawk Valley trade, manufacturing, and transportation corridor.

Cayuga–Seneca Canal

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Canal in New York, United States.

Canal in New York, United States.

The Seneca River
Lock on the Cayuga-Seneca Canal
Cayuga–Seneca Canal from Seneca Lake State Park, Geneva, New York.
Cayuga–Seneca Canal at the Northern tip of Seneca Lake.
Cayuga–Seneca Canal from Seneca Falls, New York.

The Cayuga–Seneca Canal connects the Erie Canal to Cayuga Lake and Seneca Lake.

View north along the thruway in Ramapo

New York State Thruway

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System of controlled-access highways spanning 569.83 mi within the U.S. state of New York.

System of controlled-access highways spanning 569.83 mi within the U.S. state of New York.

View north along the thruway in Ramapo
Tappan Zee Bridge (I-87 and I-287)
The New York State Thruway (I-87) looking east from Nordkop Mountain in Suffern
I-90, part of the New York State Thruway, looking east near Syracuse
Advance signage for exit 45 (I-490)
NYS Thruway near Silver Creek
Original Tappan Zee Bridge
In the late 1970s, NYSTA experimented with all-metric signage in the Syracuse area, such as these signs at exit 35.
All of I-90 within New York is designated as the "AMVETS Memorial Highway", as indicated by this sign at the Port Byron service area.
A former New York State Thruway toll ticket obtained at exit 25A
Approaching the Williamsville toll barrier on I-90 / Thruway westbound. This toll plaza is now removed and replaced with the electronic tolls on the Thruway

From exit 26 west to Utica, the mainline of the Thruway parallels the Erie Canal and the Mohawk River, crossing over the water-bodies at Mohawk.

Perspective map of Mechanicville from the late 19th century by L.R. Burleigh showing the Champlain Canal and Hudson River

Champlain Canal

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60 mi canal in New York that connects the Hudson River to the south end of Lake Champlain.

60 mi canal in New York that connects the Hudson River to the south end of Lake Champlain.

Perspective map of Mechanicville from the late 19th century by L.R. Burleigh showing the Champlain Canal and Hudson River
Tug and barge on the Champlain Canal during the 1980s
Second-generation water supply locks (the five combines), built to supply water from the Hudson River to the Champlain canal, Glens Falls Feeder, Fort Edward, NY. Also utilized as secondary locks to navigate from Glen's Falls to Champlain canal. Not in use.

It was simultaneously constructed with the Erie Canal for use by commercial vessels, fully opening in 1823.

New York City

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Most populous city in the United States.

Most populous city in the United States.

New Amsterdam, centered in the eventual Lower Manhattan, in 1664, the year England took control and renamed it "New York"
Fort George and the City of New York c. 1731. Royal Navy ships of the line are seen guarding what would become New York Harbor.
Columbia University was founded by royal charter in 1754 under the name of King's College.
The Battle of Long Island, the largest battle of the American Revolution, took place in Brooklyn in 1776.
Broadway follows the Native American Wickquasgeck Trail through Manhattan.
The current 5 boroughs of Greater New York as they appeared in 1814. Bronx was in Westchester County, Queens County included modern Nassau County, Kings County had 6 towns, one of which was Brooklyn, New York City is shown by hatching in southern New York County on the island of Manhattan, and Richmond County on Staten Island.
A construction worker atop the Empire State Building as it was being built in 1930. The Chrysler Building is behind him.
Manhattan's Little Italy, Lower East Side, circa 1900
The Stonewall Inn in Greenwich Village, a designated U.S. National Historic Landmark and National Monument, as the site of the June 1969 Stonewall riots and the cradle of the modern gay rights movement
United Airlines Flight 175 hits the South Tower of the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001.
The core of the New York City metropolitan area, with Manhattan Island at its center
Lower and Midtown Manhattan, as seen by a SkySat satellite in 2017
Central Park in Winter by Raymond Speers, in Munsey's Magazine, February 1900
Flushing Meadows–Corona Park was used in both the 1939 and 1964 New York World's Fair, with the Unisphere as the centerpiece of the latter and which remains today.
The Statue of Liberty on Liberty Island in New York Harbor is a symbol of the United States and its ideals of freedom, democracy, and opportunity.
View of The Pond and Midtown Manhattan from the Gapstow Bridge in Central Park, one of the world's most visited tourist attractions, in 2019
California sea lions play at the Bronx Zoo, the world's largest metropolitan zoo.
A map of racial distribution in New York, 2010 U.S. census. Each dot is 25 people:
The landmark Neo-Gothic Roman Catholic St. Patrick's Cathedral, Midtown Manhattan
Ultra-Orthodox Jewish residents in Brooklyn. Brooklyn has the largest Jewish community in the United States, with approximately 600,000 individuals.
The Islamic Cultural Center of New York in Upper Manhattan was the first mosque built in New York City.
Ganesh Temple in Flushing, Queens, is the oldest Hindu temple in the Western Hemisphere.
The New York Stock Exchange, by a significant margin the world's largest stock exchange per market capitalization of its listed companies, at US$23.1 trillion as of April 2018. Pictured is the exchange's building on Wall Street.
The Deutsche Bank Center as viewed from Central Park West
Times Square is the hub of the Broadway theater district and a media center. It also has one of the highest annual attendance rates of any tourist attraction in the world, estimated at 50 million.
The I Love New York logo, designed by Milton Glaser in 1977
Rockefeller Center is home to NBC Studios.
Times Square Studios, home of Good Morning America
Butler Library at Columbia University, described as one of the most beautiful college libraries in the United States
The Washington Square Arch, an unofficial icon of both New York University (NYU) and its Greenwich Village neighborhood
New York-Presbyterian Hospital, affiliated with Columbia University and Cornell University, the largest hospital and largest private employer in New York City and one of the world's busiest
The New York Police Department (NYPD) is the largest police force in the United States.
Police officers of New York Police Department (NYPD)
The Fire Department of New York (FDNY) is the largest municipal fire department in the United States.
The Stephen A. Schwarzman Headquarters Building of the New York Public Library, at 5th Avenue and 42nd Street
The fast-paced streets of New York City, January 2020
Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, part of Museum Mile, is one of the largest museums in the world.
Smorgasburg opened in 2011 as an open-air food market and is part of the Brooklyn Flea.
As of 2012, the city had about 6,000 hybrid taxis (shown) in service, the largest number of any city in North America.
New York City Hall is the oldest City Hall in the United States that still houses its original governmental functions.
The New York County Courthouse houses the New York Supreme Court and other offices.
Eric Adams, the current and 110th Mayor of New York City
New York City is home to the two busiest train stations in the U.S., including Grand Central Terminal.
The New York City Subway is the world's largest rapid transit system by number of stations.
The Port Authority Bus Terminal, the world's busiest bus station, at 8th Avenue and 42nd Street
John F. Kennedy Airport in Queens, the busiest international air passenger gateway to the United States
The Staten Island Ferry shuttles commuters between Manhattan and Staten Island.
Yellow medallion taxicabs are widely recognized icons of the city.
8th Avenue, looking northward ("uptown"). Most streets and avenues in Manhattan's grid plan incorporate a one-way traffic configuration.
The George Washington Bridge, connecting Upper Manhattan (background) from Fort Lee, New Jersey across the Hudson River, is the world's busiest motor vehicle bridge.
The growing skyline of Long Island City, Queens (background),<ref>{{cite web|url=https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-10-30/nyc-s-fastest-growing-neighborhood-gets-180-million-investment|title=NYC's Fastest-Growing Neighborhood Gets $180 Million Investment|first=Henry|last=Goldman|date=October 30, 2018|publisher=Bloomberg L.P|access-date=October 30, 2018}}</ref> facing the East River and Manhattan in May 2017
The Grand Concourse in the Bronx, foreground, with Manhattan in the background in February 2018
St. George, Staten Island as seen from the Staten Island Ferry, the world's busiest passenger-only ferry system, shuttling passengers between Manhattan and Staten Island
The Asia gate entrance to the Bronx Zoo, the world's largest metropolitan zoo.
The Spanish Harlem Orchestra. New York City is home to nearly 3 million Latino Americans, the largest Hispanic population of any city outside Latin America and Spain.
The Financial District of Lower Manhattan including Wall Street, the world's principal financial center

The 1825 completion of the Erie Canal through central New York connected the Atlantic port to the agricultural markets and commodities of the North American interior via the Hudson River and the Great Lakes.

Troy, New York

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City in the U.S. state of New York and the county seat of Rensselaer County.

City in the U.S. state of New York and the county seat of Rensselaer County.

Troy's Union Depot circa 1900
Neighborhoods of Troy
The Payne Mansion (2017)
Northern River Street
City Council meeting in the former City Hall on River Street

The trade was vastly increased after the construction of the Erie Canal, with its eastern terminus directly across the Hudson from Troy at Cohoes in 1825.

Portrait by Rembrandt Peale (1823)

DeWitt Clinton

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Almost always spelled De Witt during his lifetime and until the late 20th century, was an American politician and naturalist.

Almost always spelled De Witt during his lifetime and until the late 20th century, was an American politician and naturalist.

Portrait by Rembrandt Peale (1823)
Gubernatorial portrait of Clinton.
Print showing Clinton mingling the waters of Lake Erie and the Atlantic, 1826.
Clinton Memorial by Henry Kirke Brown, 1855, at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, New York.
$1,000 Legal Tender note, Series 1880, Fr.187k, depicting DeWitt Clinton.

In this last capacity, he was largely responsible for the construction of the Erie Canal.

Cleveland

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Major city in the U.S. state of Ohio and the county seat of Cuyahoga County.

Major city in the U.S. state of Ohio and the county seat of Cuyahoga County.

James G. C. Hamilton's 1888 statue of General Moses Cleaveland.
Bird's-eye view of Cleveland in 1877
1917 multilingual poster in English, Italian, Hungarian, Slovene, Polish, and Yiddish, advertising English classes for new immigrants in Cleveland
Cleveland's iconic Terminal Tower under construction in 1927
The Cuyahoga River winds through the Flats in a December 1937 aerial view of Downtown Cleveland.
Key Tower and the Fountain of Eternal Life monument by Marshall Fredericks at the Cleveland Mall
Skyline of Cleveland in 2012. From left to right: Terminal Tower, Key Tower and 200 Public Square
NASA satellite photograph of Cleveland at night
Facades of buildings along Euclid Avenue
Downtown Cleveland from Edgewater Park
The Ohio City neighborhood at night
Map of the territorial evolution of Cleveland
Cleveland and Lake Erie in winter
Map of racial distribution in Greater Cleveland, 2010 U.S. Census. Each dot is 25 people:
Originally built in 1905 as the Jewish Temple B'nai Jeshurun, this building on Cleveland's East Side, today known as the Shiloh Baptist Church, now serves the African American community.
The Feast of the Assumption in Cleveland's Little Italy
Annual Slovenian Kurentovanje celebration at the Slovenian National Home St. Clair-Superior enclave
St. Theodosius Russian Orthodox Cathedral in Tremont
Entrance of the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland on East 6th Street downtown
Commerce by Daniel Chester French at the Metzenbaum U.S. Courthouse on Superior Avenue
Adelbert Hall on the campus of Case Western Reserve University
Interior of the 1925 main building of the Cleveland Public Library
Conductor Franz Welser-Möst leading the Cleveland Orchestra. Welser-Möst has served as the orchestra's music director since 2002.
Cleveland's Playhouse Square is the second largest performing arts center in the U.S. after New York's Lincoln Center. It hosts the annual Cleveland International Film Festival.
Jazz poet and resident Clevelander Langston Hughes
The Cleveland Museum of Art lies at the edge of Wade Lagoon in University Circle.
The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame on the shores of Lake Erie
The historic West Side Market in Cleveland's Ohio City neighborhood
Cleveland Cavaliers pregame festivities at Rocket Mortgage FieldHouse
Cleveland Browns games attract large crowds to FirstEnergy Stadium.
The west bank of the Flats and the Cuyahoga River in Downtown Cleveland
Cleveland City Hall rotunda
A Cleveland Police black and white parked outside of Cleveland City Hall
Downtown Cleveland from the Superior Viaduct at night
Moon over Downtown Cleveland
The Cleveland Clinic Miller Family Pavilion
An RTA train arrives at the Shaker Square station.
Streets of Cleveland
One of the "Guardians of Traffic" at the Hope Memorial Bridge
1992 aerial view of the Cleveland harbor, with the mouth of the Cuyahoga River in the foreground (view towards the east)
Cyrus S. Eaton and his wife Anne in Leipzig, East Germany, 1960
Cleveland Arcade, 1890
Cleveland Trust Company Building, 1907
Connor Palace Theatre, 1922
Terminal Tower from Euclid Avenue
Grand foyer of Severance Hall, 1931
Euclid Avenue and East 9th Street with the Hickox Building in 1918
The Wolstein Center is home to Cleveland State Vikings basketball and the Cleveland Charge.

This key link between the Ohio River and the Great Lakes connected it to the Atlantic Ocean via the Erie Canal and Hudson River, and later via the Saint Lawrence Seaway.