A report on Erie Canal

Erie Canal map c. 1840
Aqueduct over the Mohawk River at Rexford, one of 32 navigable aqueducts on the Erie Canal
The Mohawk Valley, running east and west, cuts a natural pathway (water gap) between the Catskill Mountains to the south and the Adirondack Mountains to the north.
Profile of the original canal
Operations at Lockport, New York, in 1839
Stonework of lock abandoned because of route change, at Durhamville, New York
An original five-step lock structure crossing the Niagara Escarpment at Lockport, now without gates and used as a cascade for excess water
Erie Canal lock in Lockport, New York
1853 map of New York canals emboldened, center: the Erie Canal; other lines: railroads, rivers and county borders
Lithograph of the Erie Canal at Lockport, New York c. 1855. Published for Herrman J. Meyer, 164 William Street, New York City.
Aqueduct over Nine Mile Creek north of Camillus, New York, built in 1841 and abandoned c. 1918; one of 32 navigable aqueducts on the Erie Canal, it has since been restored.
Upstream view of the downstream lock at Lock 32, Pittsford, New York
Map of the "Water Level Routes" of the New York Central Railroad (purple), West Shore Railroad (red) and Erie Canal (blue)
Rochester, New York, aqueduct c. 1890
Two "low" lift bridges in Lockport, New York, July 2010
The modern Erie Canal has 34 locks, which are painted with the blue and gold colors of the New York State Canal System.
Gateway Harbor in North Tonawanda, about 1000 ft from the present-day western terminus of the Erie Canal where it connects to the Niagara River
The Old Erie Canal and its towpath at Kirkville, New York, within Old Erie Canal State Historic Park
Buffalo's Erie Canal Commercial Slip in Spring 2008
Erie Canal Lock 18, Cohoes, New York
Old Erie Canal State Historic Park, DeWitt, New York
The modern single lock at the Niagara Escarpment

Historic canal in upstate New York that runs east-west between the Hudson River and Lake Erie.

- Erie Canal

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Montezuma, New York

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Town in Cayuga County, New York, United States.

Town in Cayuga County, New York, United States.

The Erie Canal was built through here, bringing new commerce, as did the railroad.

Pendleton, New York

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Town on the southern edge of Niagara County, New York, United States.

Town on the southern edge of Niagara County, New York, United States.

The Erie Canal passes through the eastern part of the town, where it connects to Tonawanda Creek.

Waterford Harbor on the Mohawk River

Waterford, New York

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Town in Saratoga County, New York, United States.

Town in Saratoga County, New York, United States.

Waterford Harbor on the Mohawk River
Saratoga County, New York. Town of Waterford highlighted in red

The town is located in the southeast corner of Saratoga County and north-northwest of Troy at the junction of the Erie Canal and the Hudson River.

Olean, New York

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City in Cattaraugus County, New York.

City in Cattaraugus County, New York.

This period ended with the creation of the great canals, especially the Erie Canal in 1825.

A towpath in use on the Finow Canal in Germany.

Towpath

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Road or trail on the bank of a river, canal, or other inland waterway.

Road or trail on the bank of a river, canal, or other inland waterway.

A towpath in use on the Finow Canal in Germany.
People towing a vessel in the Netherlands in 1931
Mules pulling boat on the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal.
A roving bridge on the English Staffordshire and Worcestershire Canal. The towpath changes to the other side of the canal but the horse does not have to be unhitched
A towpath cut into the rock beside the Lot river in south-west France
"Towboats Along the Yotsugi-dōri Canal" from Hiroshige's "One Hundred Famous Views of Edo" series; a depiction of a towpath in rural Tokyo, mid 19c.
Example of Rope abrasion, on a bridge (which also functions as a stop gate) on the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal

Erie Canal

Nine remaining arches of the Schoharie Creek Aqueduct with the footpath on the left and the remains of the canal crossing on the right

Schoharie Crossing State Historic Site

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Nine remaining arches of the Schoharie Creek Aqueduct with the footpath on the left and the remains of the canal crossing on the right
Fort Hunter and Queen Anne's Chapel
The East Guard Lock and Original Erie Canal Prism remain at Schoharie Crossing State Historic Site
A view of Empire Lock 29 from the Enlarged Era Erie Canal.
Schoharie Aqueduct, showing the canalway
Putman's Canal Store with Lock 28, also known as "Yankee Hill" Lock, of the Enlarged Erie Canal in front.
Schoharie Crossing's Visitor Center is located on the east bank of the Schoharie Creek in Fort Hunter.

Schoharie Crossing State Historic Site, also known as Erie Canal National Historic Landmark, is a historic district that includes the ruins of the Erie Canal aqueduct over Schoharie Creek, and a 3.5 mi long part of the Erie Canal, in the towns of Glen and Florida within Montgomery County, New York.

Susquehanna River

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Major river located in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States, overlapping between the lower Northeast and the Upland South.

Major river located in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States, overlapping between the lower Northeast and the Upland South.

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Satellite photo of the river (upper left) where it empties into the Chesapeake Bay (center)
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Harrisburg, with the Pennsylvania State Capitol dome, seen from Wormleysburg
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Monument at the site of Gen. Clinton's dam at the river's source at Otsego Lake in Cooperstown, New York
An aerial view looking south over the Wrights Ferry Bridge (front) and the Veterans Memorial Bridge (behind). Columbia, PA is located off the eastern side of the river (left) and Wrightsville, PA is located on the western side (right).
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Three Mile Island on the Susquehanna River.

In 1833 John B. Jervis began a canal system to extend the Chenango River and connect the waters of the Susquehanna from Chenango Point to the Erie Canal, which ran through the Mohawk Valley of New York, ultimately connecting with Lake Erie through the Wood Canal.

Lake Champlain-River Richelieu watershed

Lake Champlain

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Natural freshwater lake in North America mainly within the borders of the United States (in the states of Vermont and New York) but also across the Canada–U.S. border into the Canadian province of Quebec.

Natural freshwater lake in North America mainly within the borders of the United States (in the states of Vermont and New York) but also across the Canada–U.S. border into the Canadian province of Quebec.

Lake Champlain-River Richelieu watershed
Sentinel-2 satellite photo
Lake Champlain in Burlington Harbor during sunset on May 27, 2012
Brooklyn Museum – Green Mountains, Lake Champlain – Winckworth Allan Gay – overall
Map of Lac Champlain, from Fort de Chambly up to Fort St-Fréderic in Nouvelle France. Cadastral map showing concessions and seigneuries on the coasts of the lake according to 1739 surveying.
Charlotte Ferry, Lake Champlain
The Champlain Valley as seen from Camel's Hump
Lake Champlain, Charlotte, Vermont
Dutton House, Shelburne Museum
Stagecoach Inn, Shelburne Museum
Sawmill, Shelburne Museum
A 1902 photograph of Fort Henry at Lake Champlain
The Champlain Bridge between New York and Vermont, demolished in December 2009
The LCTC ferry slip at Grand Isle, Vermont
The Swanton-Alburgh trestle spans Lake Champlain between the two Vermont towns: a distance of about 0.8 mi.
At sunset, looking west from Grand Isle to Plattsburgh and Crab Island
The lighthouse in Lake Champlain at dusk, as seen from Burlington, VT
USCG, Burlington, Vermont – main installation
Vermont Department of Fish and Wildlife boat docked near ECHO Aquarium

Lake Champlain has been connected to the Erie Canal via the Champlain Canal since the canal's official opening on September 9, 1823: the same day as the opening of the Erie Canal from Rochester on Lake Ontario to Albany.

Nine Mile Creek running beneath aqueduct, prior to its 2009 restoration

Nine Mile Creek Aqueduct

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Nine Mile Creek running beneath aqueduct, prior to its 2009 restoration
Progress of restoration as of May 25, 2009
Timbering
Through the towpath archways

Nine Mile Creek Aqueduct is a restored stone and wood aqueduct of the Erie Canal over Nine Mile Creek in Camillus, New York, United States.

Original publication of "Low Bridge, Everybody Down"

Low Bridge (song)

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Written by Thomas S. Allen , recorded in 1912, and published by F.B. Haviland Publishing Company in 1913.

Written by Thomas S. Allen , recorded in 1912, and published by F.B. Haviland Publishing Company in 1913.

Original publication of "Low Bridge, Everybody Down"

It was written after the construction of the New York State Barge Canal, which would replace the Erie Canal, was well underway, furthering the change from mule power to engine power, raising the speed of traffic.