Ernest Hemingway

HemingwayHemingwayesqueE. HemingwayHemingway, ErnestHemingwaysErnestErnest '''HemingwayErnest 'Ernie' HemingwayErnest and Pauline HemingwayErnest Hemingway,
Ernest Miller Hemingway (July 21, 1899 – July 2, 1961) was an American journalist, novelist, and short-story writer.wikipedia
2,098 Related Articles

Iceberg theory

understated stylewriting style and narration method
His economical and understated style—which he termed the iceberg theory—had a strong influence on 20th-century fiction, while his adventurous lifestyle and his public image brought him admiration from later generations.
The iceberg theory (sometimes known as the "theory of omission") is a style of writing (turned colloquialism) coined by American writer Ernest Hemingway.

A Farewell to Arms

novel1929 semi-autobiographical novel of the same namebook
His wartime experiences formed the basis for his novel A Farewell to Arms (1929).
A Farewell to Arms is a novel by Ernest Hemingway set during the Italian campaign of World War I.

Hadley Richardson

HadleyHadley Hemingway
In 1921, he married Hadley Richardson, the first of what would be four wives.
Elizabeth Hadley Richardson (November 9, 1891 – January 22, 1979) was the first wife of American author Ernest Hemingway.

American literature

American authorAmerican writerAmerican
Many of his works are considered classics of American literature.
Ernest Hemingway became famous with The Sun Also Rises and A Farewell to Arms; in 1954, he won the Nobel Prize in Literature.

The Sun Also Rises

novelBrettFiesta'' (novel)
His debut novel, The Sun Also Rises, was published in 1926.
The Sun Also Rises, a 1926 novel by American Ernest Hemingway, portrays American and British expatriates who travel from Paris to the Festival of San Fermín in Pamplona to watch the running of the bulls and the bullfights.

The Kansas City Star

Kansas City StarKansas City Star and TimesKansas City Star Company
After high school, he reported for a few months for The Kansas City Star before leaving for the Italian Front to enlist as an ambulance driver in World War I.
The Star is most notable for its influence on the career of President Harry Truman and as the newspaper where a young Ernest Hemingway honed his writing style.

Lost Generation

The Lost GenerationAmerican expatriate communityentire generation
The couple moved to Paris, where he worked as a foreign correspondent and fell under the influence of the modernist writers and artists of the 1920s "Lost Generation" expatriate community.
Lost in this respect means disoriented, wandering, directionless—a recognition that there was great confusion and aimlessness among the war's survivors in the early post-war years." The term is synonymous with a group of artists, and particularly US-expatriate writers, living in Paris during the 1920s. Gertrude Stein is credited with coining the term; it was subsequently popularized by Ernest Hemingway who used it as an epigraph for his 1926 novel The Sun Also Rises.

For Whom the Bell Tolls

novel of the same name1940 novelbook of the same name
He based For Whom the Bell Tolls (1940) on his experience there.
For Whom the Bell Tolls is a novel by Ernest Hemingway published in 1940.

Oak Park, Illinois

Oak ParkOak Park, ILOak Pa
Hemingway was raised in Oak Park, Illinois.
Other attractions include Ernest Hemingway's birthplace home and his boyhood home, the Ernest Hemingway Museum, the three Oak Park homes of writer and Tarzan creator Edgar Rice Burroughs, Wright's Unity Temple, Pleasant Home, and the Oak Park-River Forest Historical Society.

Mary Welsh Hemingway

MaryMary HemingwayMary Welsh
Martha Gellhorn became his third wife in 1940; they separated after he met Mary Welsh in London during World War II.
Mary Welsh Hemingway (April 5, 1908 – November 26, 1986) was an American journalist and author, who was the fourth wife and widow of Ernest Hemingway.

The Old Man and the Sea

Hemingway’s Santiagonovelnovel of the same name
Shortly after the publication of The Old Man and the Sea (1952), Hemingway went on safari to Africa, where he was almost killed in two successive plane crashes that left him in pain or ill-health for much of the rest of his life.
The Old Man and the Sea is a short novel written by the American author Ernest Hemingway in 1951 in Cuba, and published in 1952.

Pauline Pfeiffer

PaulinePauline Marie PfeifferPauline Pfeiffer Hemingway
After his 1927 divorce from Richardson, Hemingway married Pauline Pfeiffer; they divorced after he returned from the Spanish Civil War, where he had been a journalist.
Pauline Marie Pfeiffer (July 22, 1895 – October 1, 1951) was an American journalist, and the second wife of writer Ernest Hemingway.

Martha Gellhorn

third wife
Martha Gellhorn became his third wife in 1940; they separated after he met Mary Welsh in London during World War II.
Gellhorn was also the third wife of American novelist Ernest Hemingway, from 1940 to 1945.

Grace Hall Hemingway

Grace Hemingway
His father, Clarence Edmonds Hemingway, was a physician, and his mother, Grace Hall Hemingway, was a musician.
She was Ernest Hemingway's mother.

20th century in literature

20th century20th-century literature20th
His economical and understated style—which he termed the iceberg theory—had a strong influence on 20th-century fiction, while his adventurous lifestyle and his public image brought him admiration from later generations.
In Our Time by Ernest Hemingway (USA) - short stories

Ernest Hemingway Cottage

WindemereErnest Hemingway's boyhood summer cottageHemingway family summer cottage
The family spent summers at Windemere on Walloon Lake, near Petoskey, Michigan.
The Ernest Hemingway Cottage, also known as Windemere, was the boyhood summer home of author Ernest Hemingway, on Walloon Lake in Michigan.

Ring Lardner

LardnerLardner, RingRing Lardner, Sr.
He edited the Trapeze and the Tabula (the yearbook), imitating the language of sportswriters, taking the pen name Ring Lardner, Jr.—a nod to Ring Lardner of the Chicago Tribune whose byline was "Line O'Type."
His contemporaries Ernest Hemingway, Virginia Woolf, and F. Scott Fitzgerald all professed strong admiration for his writing.

Big Two-Hearted River

The trip became the inspiration for his short story "Big Two-Hearted River", in which the semi-autobiographical character Nick Adams takes to the country to find solitude after returning from war.
"Big Two-Hearted River" is a two-part short story written by American author Ernest Hemingway, published in the 1925 Boni & Liveright edition of In Our Time, the first American volume of Hemingway's short stories.

Agnes von Kurowsky

a nurse
While recuperating, he fell in love for the first time with Agnes von Kurowsky, a Red Cross nurse seven years his senior.
Agnes von Kurowsky Stanfield (January 5, 1892 – November 25, 1984) was an American nurse who inspired the character "Catherine Barkley" in Ernest Hemingway's A Farewell to Arms.

Stephen Crane

Crane, StephenStephen Crane House
Like Mark Twain, Stephen Crane, Theodore Dreiser, and Sinclair Lewis, Hemingway was a journalist before becoming a novelist.
His writing made a deep impression on 20th-century writers, most prominent among them Ernest Hemingway, and is thought to have inspired the Modernists and the Imagists.

John Dos Passos

Dos Passostrilogy USA
It was probably around this time that he first met John Dos Passos, with whom he had a rocky relationship for decades.
The murder of his friend José Robles soured his attitude toward Communism, and led to severing his relationship with fellow writer Ernest Hemingway.

Gertrude Stein

GertrudeSteinStein, Gertrude
In Paris, Hemingway met American writer and art collector Gertrude Stein, Irish novelist James Joyce, American poet Ezra Pound (who "could help a young writer up the rungs of a career" ) and other writers.
She hosted a Paris salon, where the leading figures of modernism in literature and art, such as Pablo Picasso, Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Sinclair Lewis, Ezra Pound, Sherwood Anderson and Henri Matisse, would meet.

Nick Adams (character)

Nick AdamsThe Nick Adams Stories
The trip became the inspiration for his short story "Big Two-Hearted River", in which the semi-autobiographical character Nick Adams takes to the country to find solitude after returning from war.
Nicholas Adams is a fictional character, the protagonist of two dozen short stories and vignettes written in the 1920s and 1930s by American author Ernest Hemingway.

Ezra Pound

PoundPound, EzraPoundian
In Paris, Hemingway met American writer and art collector Gertrude Stein, Irish novelist James Joyce, American poet Ezra Pound (who "could help a young writer up the rungs of a career" ) and other writers.
Pound worked in London during the early 20th century as foreign editor of several American literary magazines, and helped discover and shape the work of contemporaries such as T. S. Eliot, James Joyce, Robert Frost and Ernest Hemingway.

List of ambulance drivers during World War I

Norton-Harjes Ambulance Corpsambulance driverambulance driver in World War I
After high school, he reported for a few months for The Kansas City Star before leaving for the Italian Front to enlist as an ambulance driver in World War I.
Ernest Hemingway – volunteer American Red Cross in Italy