Ernest Martin Hopkins

Ernest Martin Hopkins (November 6, 1877 – August 13, 1964) served as the 11th President of Dartmouth College from 1916 to 1945.

- Ernest Martin Hopkins

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The Hopkins Center

Hopkins Center for the Arts

Located at 4 East Wheelock Street in Hanover, New Hampshire.

Located at 4 East Wheelock Street in Hanover, New Hampshire.

The Hopkins Center
Béla Fleck and Chick Corea, March 1, 2008, Spaulding Auditorium

Its genesis was the promise for a new theater made in the late 1920s by then Dartmouth president Ernest Martin Hopkins to Warner Bentley, a newly recruited English faculty member with responsibility for the non-department theatre program.

Dartmouth College

Private Ivy League research university in Hanover, New Hampshire, United States.

Private Ivy League research university in Hanover, New Hampshire, United States.

Eleazar Wheelock, Dartmouth College founder
The Charter of Dartmouth College on display in Baker Memorial Library. The charter was signed on December 13, 1769, on behalf of George III.
The earliest known image of Dartmouth appeared in the February 1793 issue of Massachusetts Magazine. The engraving may also be the first visual proof of cricket being played in the United States.
Lithograph of the President's House, Thornton Hall, Dartmouth Hall, and Wentworth Hall
College seal at the Collis Center
Baker Memorial Library
A view of East Campus from Baker Tower
Tuck School of Business
McNutt Hall, home to the Dartmouth Office of Undergraduate Admissions
Tower Room in Baker Memorial Library
Dartmouth Hall was reconstructed in 1906.
Drawing of Wilson Hall, Dartmouth's first library building, by architect Samuel J. F. Thayer (1842–1893), which appeared in American Architect and Building News in March 1885.
American elm on Dartmouth College campus, June 2011
The Hopkins Center
Sherman Fairchild Physical Sciences Center
Memorial Field
Robinson Hall houses many of the College's student-run organizations, including the Dartmouth Outing Club. The building is a designated stop along the Appalachian Trail.
Dartmouth Alpha Chi Alpha fraternity house
A Dartmouth varsity hockey game against Princeton at Thompson Arena
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The 40th Dartmouth Powwow
Seal of Dartmouth College
Lord Hall, Allen House
Morton Hall, East Wheelock House
Woodward Hall, North Park House
Mid Massachusetts Hall, School House
Topliff Hall, South House
Russell Sage Hall, West House
Robert Frost, poet
Dr. Seuss, writer and illustrator
Henry Paulson, former CEO of Goldman Sachs and United States Secretary of the Treasury
Timothy Geithner, former United States Secretary of the Treasury
Salmon Chase, former Chief Justice of the U.S.
Daniel Webster, former Secretary of State
Nelson Rockefeller, former Vice President of the United States
Kirsten Gillibrand, United States senator
Robert Reich, former United States Secretary of Labor, political commentator, professor, and author
Sarah Wayne Callies, actress
Mindy Kaling, actress and comedian
Connie Britton, actress, singer and producer
Shonda Rhimes, television producer and writer
Brad Ausmus, baseball player
Jake Tapper, journalist, author, and commentator
David Benioff, screenwriter and television producer, writer, and director
Fred Rogers, television personality
Rachel Dratch, comedian

Presidents Ernest Fox Nichols (1909–16) and Ernest Martin Hopkins (1916–45) continued Tucker's trend of modernization, further improving campus facilities and introducing selective admissions in the 1920s.

Worcester Academy

Private school in Worcester, Massachusetts.

Private school in Worcester, Massachusetts.

Warner Memorial Theater
Dexter Hall
Walker Hall, The Megaron, and Adams Hall
Kingsley Laboratories
Walker Hall
Rader Hall (library)
1898 advertisement for the school.

Ernest Martin Hopkins 1896, President of Dartmouth College

Coat of arms of Tuck

Tuck School of Business

Graduate business school of Dartmouth College, a private research university in Hanover, New Hampshire.

Graduate business school of Dartmouth College, a private research university in Hanover, New Hampshire.

Coat of arms of Tuck
Edward Tuck, founder of the Tuck School
Amos Tuck, the namesake of the Tuck School, was a founder of the Republican Party.
Tuck Hall, the Tuck School's main administrative building, after a heavy snowfall
Stell Hall, named after Julia Stell, Edward Tuck's wife
The Feldberg Business and Engineering Library
The Tuck Living and Learning Complex (LLC)
Christopher A. Sinclair T'73, former chairman and CEO of Mattel, and former CEO of Pepsi-Cola

During this period of growth, Dartmouth president Ernest Martin Hopkins wrote often to Edward Tuck reflecting on the school's flourishing alumni and faculty.

Stanley King

The eleventh president of Amherst College.

The eleventh president of Amherst College.

Said President Ernest Martin Hopkins of Amherst's rival, Dartmouth College: "My respect has continued and grown for the scope of his intellectual interest and for the quality of his thinking in regard to political and social problems."

Alpha Chi Alpha, 2007

Dartmouth College Greek organizations

Host to many Greek organizations, and a significant percentage of the undergraduate student body is active in Greek life.

Host to many Greek organizations, and a significant percentage of the undergraduate student body is active in Greek life.

Alpha Chi Alpha, 2007
Dartmouth Hall, circa 1834
The second physical plant of Kappa Kappa Kappa, located at 22 North College Street and occupied by the fraternity from 1894 to 1924. The fraternity added the "goat room" (meeting room) at the rear.
Dartmouth Beta House, circa 1920, would later become home to the Tucker Foundation.
Delta Tau Delta, shown here circa 1915, would in 1960 become today's Bones Gate fraternity.
Dartmouth Beta House, 2009
Bones Gate, 2007
Gamma Delta Chi, 2007
Theta Delta Chi, 2007
Tri-Kap, 2007
Sigma Phi Epsilon, 2007
Sigma Nu, 2007
Phi Delta Alpha, 1986
Chi Gamma Epsilon, 2007
Chi Heorot, 2007
Psi Upsilon, 2007
Zeta Psi, 2007
Alpha Xi Delta, 2011
Epsilon Kappa Theta, 2007
Kappa Delta Epsilon, 2007
Kappa Kappa Gamma, 2007
Sigma Delta, 2007
Chi Delta, 2007
Alpha Theta, 2007
The Tabard, 2007
Phi Tau, 2007
Alpha Delta, 2007
Delta Kappa Epsilon, circa 1915
The brotherhood and physical plant of Lambda Chi Alpha in the 1922 Dartmouth College yearbook, The Aegis
Sigma Alpha Epsilon, 2007
Phi Gamma Delta, circa 1915
Phi Kappa Psi, circa 1915

College President Ernest Martin Hopkins personally decided to abolish freshman rush in 1924.

Newton D. Baker

American lawyer, Georgist, politician, and government official.

American lawyer, Georgist, politician, and government official.

Baker in 1918 as Secretary of War
Secretary of War Newton D. Baker (right), Major General James W. McAndrew (left) and Major General Andre W. Brewster (center) with a group of German prisoners who have just arrived from the front, September 26, 1918.
Newton D. Baker, the Secretary of War, accompanied by Brigadier General Michael J. Lenihan and Major General Charles T. Menoher, inspecting elements of both the 166th Regiment and the 149th Machine Gun Battalion in Bénaménil, France, March 19, 1918.
Elizabeth Leopold Baker

Among the prominent names who called the Encyclopedia to account were Livingston Farrand of Cornell and Ernest M. Hopkins of Dartmouth.

Edward Tuck

American banker, diplomat, and philanthropist.

American banker, diplomat, and philanthropist.

Edward Tuck and Julia Stell on the steps of :fr:Domaine de Vert-Mont
Tuck's French country residence, Domaine de Vert-Mont
Château de Bois-Préau

In 1929, after solicitation from Ernest Martin Hopkins, the 11th President of Dartmouth, Tuck donated 600 shares of Chase National Bank, which was sold for $567,766.

David T. McLaughlin

The 14th President of Dartmouth College, 1981–1987.

The 14th President of Dartmouth College, 1981–1987.

Like his predecessor Ernest Martin Hopkins, the fourteenth president in the Wheelock Succession came from a business background.

Logo of Vermont Academy.

Vermont Academy

Private, co-educational, college preparatory, boarding and day school in Saxtons River, Vermont, serving students from ninth through twelfth grade, as well as postgraduates.

Private, co-educational, college preparatory, boarding and day school in Saxtons River, Vermont, serving students from ninth through twelfth grade, as well as postgraduates.

Logo of Vermont Academy.
Frank C. Archibald
View of the Vermont Academy campus in 2013.
Bruce Brown
Clara Converse
Paul Harris
Jordan Nwora
Joe Perry
Bill Torrey

In 1934, Ernest Martin Hopkins, President of Dartmouth College, recommended Laurence G. Leavitt, a fellow Dartmouth graduate, for the job of Head of School of Vermont Academy.