Ernie Banks

Banks
Ernest Banks (January 31, 1931 – January 23, 2015), nicknamed "Mr. Cub" and "Mr. Sunshine", was an American professional baseball player who starred in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a shortstop and first baseman for the Chicago Cubs between 1953 and 1971.wikipedia
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Chicago Cubs

CubsChicago OrphansCHC
Ernest Banks (January 31, 1931 – January 23, 2015), nicknamed "Mr. Cub" and "Mr. Sunshine", was an American professional baseball player who starred in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a shortstop and first baseman for the Chicago Cubs between 1953 and 1971.
Although shortstop Ernie Banks would become one of the star players in the league during the next decade, finding help for him proved a difficult task, as quality players such as Hank Sauer were few and far between.

Wrigley Field

Cubs ParkWeeghman ParkChicago
In 1970, Banks hit his 500th career home run at Wrigley Field.
Wrigley Field is nicknamed "The Friendly Confines", a phrase popularized by "Mr. Cub", Hall of Fame shortstop and first baseman Ernie Banks.

Shortstop

SSshort stopshortstops
Ernest Banks (January 31, 1931 – January 23, 2015), nicknamed "Mr. Cub" and "Mr. Sunshine", was an American professional baseball player who starred in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a shortstop and first baseman for the Chicago Cubs between 1953 and 1971.
In practice, a marginal fielder as a shortstop who hits well can be moved to almost any other position, especially second base or third base, whether early in their careers (examples: George Brett and Mike Schmidt were both tried early in their careers as shortstops) or later due to diminished fielding range, slower reflexes, weaker throwing arms, increased risk of injury, or co-existence with another dominant shortstop, as with Ernie Banks, Cal Ripken Jr., Alex Rodríguez, Michael Young, or Miguel Tejada.

Booker T. Washington High School for the Performing and Visual Arts

Booker T. Washington High SchoolBooker T. WashingtonArts Magnet
Banks graduated from Booker T. Washington High School in 1950.
Some examples include Ernie Banks, Norah Jones, Erykah Badu, Adario Strange, Valarie Rae Miller, Edie Brickell, Kennedy Davenport, Sandra St. Victor, Roy Hargrove, and Scott Westerfeld.

Alvin Dark

Al Dark
Seeing that Musial was running to second, third baseman Alvin Dark ran to the backstop to retrieve the ball.
His .411 career slugging average was the seventh highest by an NL shortstop at his retirement, and his 126 home runs placed him behind only Ernie Banks and Travis Jackson.

Dallas Black Giants

While still in high school, Banks joined the Dallas Black Giants, a semi-pro baseball team, in 1949.
One of the best known players on the Black Giants was shortstop Ernie Banks who would go on to become a star in Major League Baseball for the Chicago Cubs.

Kansas City Monarchs

MonarchsKansas City Giants
He began playing professional baseball in 1950 with the Kansas City Monarchs in the Negro leagues.
The team sent more players to the majors than any other Negro League franchise, including Robinson, Paige, Ernie Banks, Elston Howard, Hank Thompson, and Willard Brown.

First baseman

first base1Bfirst basemen
Ernest Banks (January 31, 1931 – January 23, 2015), nicknamed "Mr. Cub" and "Mr. Sunshine", was an American professional baseball player who starred in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a shortstop and first baseman for the Chicago Cubs between 1953 and 1971.
Such players include Hall of Famers Johnny Bench (originally a catcher), George Brett (third baseman), Ernie Banks (shortstop), Rod Carew (second baseman), Al Kaline (right fielder), Mickey Mantle (center fielder), Mike Piazza (catcher), and Mike Schmidt (third baseman).

Bert Wilson (sportscaster)

Bert WilsonBert Wilson (broadcaster)
When Steve Bilko played first base, Cubs announcer Bert Wilson referred to the Banks-Baker-Bilko double play combination as "Bingo to Bango to Bilko".
He also invented a short-lived catchphrase for the double play combination of Ernie Banks, Gene Baker and Steve Bilko: "Bingo to Bango to Bilko".

Wally Moon

Banks hit 19 home runs and finished second to Wally Moon in Rookie of the Year voting.
Almost a unanimous vote, Moon won easily over Ernie Banks, Gene Conley and Hank Aaron.

Cal Ripken Jr.

Cal Ripken, Jr.Cal RipkenCal Ripken, Jr
(Cal Ripken, Jr now holds the record for most home runs as a shortstop with 345.
He holds the record for most home runs hit as a shortstop (345), breaking the record previously held by Ernie Banks, and was selected as the starting shortstop for the Major League Baseball All-Century Team.

Negro league baseball

Negro LeaguesNegro LeagueNegro baseball league
He began playing professional baseball in 1950 with the Kansas City Monarchs in the Negro leagues.
Other members of the Hall who played in both the Negro leagues and Major League Baseball are Hank Aaron, Ernie Banks, Roy Campanella, Larry Doby, Willie Mays, and Jackie Robinson.

Gene Baker

In 1954, Banks' double play partner during his official rookie season was Gene Baker, the Cubs' second black player.
A few days after acquiring Baker, the Cubs acquired another shortstop, future Hall of Famer Ernie Banks, and moved Baker to second base, perhaps believing he would be able to adapt to a different position more easily than the younger Banks.

Tony Taylor (baseball)

Tony Taylor
When Anderson noticed that Musial was trying for second, he took the new ball from Sammy Taylor and threw it towards Tony Taylor covering second base, and the ball went over Taylor's head into the outfield.
At the same time that Anderson threw the new ball towards second baseman Taylor, Dark threw the original ball to shortstop Ernie Banks.

Billy Williams

Billy Williams (left fielder)Billy Williams (LF)
Later, when Banks felt like becoming more vocal, he discussed the issue with teammate Billy Williams, who advised him to remain quiet.
Williams joined a Chicago Cubs team that by the early 1960s would feature stars such as Ernie Banks, Ferguson Jenkins, and Ron Santo.

Stan Musial

MusialStan "The Man" MusialStan The Man
Stan Musial was at the plate facing Bob Anderson with a count of 3–1.
Dark, at the same time that Anderson threw the new ball, threw the original ball to shortstop Ernie Banks.

Steve Bilko

When Steve Bilko played first base, Cubs announcer Bert Wilson referred to the Banks-Baker-Bilko double play combination as "Bingo to Bango to Bilko".
During his brief stay with the Cubs, announcer Bert Wilson placed Bilko at the end of what he hoped would be a soon-to-be-famous double play combination of Ernie Banks, Gene Baker and Bilko.

Ken Hubbs

In February, Cubs second baseman Ken Hubbs was killed in an airplane crash.
Hubbs went to the Cubs' rookie camp for spring training in 1960 as a shortstop/outfielder, however with Ernie Banks established at shortstop, Hubbs moved to 2nd base in 1961.

Sammy Taylor (baseball)

Sammy Taylor
Anderson's next pitch was errant, the ball evaded catcher Sammy Taylor and rolled all the way to the backstop.
Dark, at the same time that Anderson threw the new ball, threw the original ball to shortstop Ernie Banks.

Acie Law

Acie Law IVLawLaw IV, Acie
His great nephew, Acie Law, is a professional basketball player who attended Texas A&M University before playing in the National Basketball Association (NBA).
Law is the great-nephew of Chicago Cubs great Ernie Banks.

Lou Gehrig Memorial Award

Lou Gehrig Award
Banks won the Lou Gehrig Memorial Award in 1968, an honor recognizing playing ability and personal character.

Library of Congress Living Legend

Living LegendLiving Legend AwardLiving Legend Medal
In 2009, Banks was named a Library of Congress Living Legend, a designation that recognizes those "who have made significant contributions to America's diverse cultural, scientific and social heritage".

1990 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

1990All-Star Game1990 All-Star Game
At the 1990 Major League Baseball All-Star Game, the first one held at Wrigley Field since Banks' playing days, he threw out the ceremonial first pitch to starting catcher Mike Scioscia.
The last All-Star Game previously held at Wrigley Field was represented by Ernie Banks who threw out the ceremonial first pitch.

All the Way (Eddie Vedder song)

All the WayAll the Way" (Eddie Vedder song)
That year, Eddie Vedder released a song called "All The Way", which Banks had asked Vedder to write about the Cubs as a birthday gift.
The song, which fondly looks forward to the Cubs' next World Series victory, was written with the encouragement of certain Chicago Cubs, most notably Ernie Banks.

Philip K. Wrigley

Phil WrigleyPhilip WrigleyP.K. Wrigley
In his memoir, citing his fondness for the Cubs and owner Philip K. Wrigley, Banks said he did not regret signing with the Cubs rather than one of the more successful baseball franchises.
Without firm and consistent leadership, the Cubs continued to languish in the standings, despite having Cubs greats Ernie Banks, Ron Santo, and Billy Williams on the roster.