Eros (concept)

eroseroeroticloveMarital lovethe Eros
Eros ( or ; érōs "love" or "desire") is one of the four ancient Greco-Christian terms which can be rendered into English as "love".wikipedia
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Philia

brotherly lovephileoaffectionate regard
The other three are storge, philia, and agape.
Philia, often translated "brotherly love", is one of the four ancient Greek words for love: philia, storge, agape and eros.

Agape

loveagapēdivine love
The other three are storge, philia, and agape.
Other ancient authors have used forms of the word to denote love of a spouse or family, or affection for a particular activity, in contrast to eros (an affection of a sexual nature).

Aphrodite

Aphrodite UraniaVenusAfërdita
Stories in which unwitting men catch sight of the naked body of Artemis the huntress (and sometimes Aphrodite) lead to similar ravages (as in the tale of Actaeon).
According to the Symposium, Aphrodite Ourania is the inspiration of male homosexual desire, specifically the ephebic eros.

Platonic love

platonicplatonic relationshipplatonically
"Platonic love" in this original sense can be attained by the intellectual purification of eros from carnal into ideal form.
Platonic love is examined in Plato's dialogue, the Symposium, which has as its topic the subject of love or Eros generally.

Death drive

death instinctThanatosdeath wish
But in later psychoanalytic theory, eros is opposed by the destructive death instinct of Thanatos (death instinct or death drive).
The death drive opposes Eros, the tendency toward survival, propagation, sex, and other creative, life-producing drives.

Id, ego and super-ego

egoidsuperego
In early psychoanalytic writings, instincts from the eros were opposed by forces from the ego.
Freud considered that "the id, the whole person...originally includes all the instinctual impulses...the destructive instinct as well", as eros or the life instincts.

Eros and Civilization

The philosopher and sociologist Herbert Marcuse appropriated the Freudian concept of eros for his highly influential 1955 work Eros and Civilization.
He contends that Freud's argument that repression is needed by civilization to persist is mistaken, as Eros is liberating and constructive.

Eroticism

eroticerotic loveerotically
The term erotic is derived from eros.
Eroticism (from the Greek ἔρως, eros—"desire") is a quality that causes sexual feelings, as well as a philosophical contemplation concerning the aesthetics of sexual desire, sensuality and romantic love.

Color wheel theory of love

love stylesPragmalove style
Love styles
The three primary types are eros, ludus and storge, and the three secondary types are mania, pragma and agape.

Greek love

GreekGreek model of love between menlovers
Greek love
In the early Modern period, a disjuncture was carefully maintained between idealized male eros in the classical tradition, which was treated with reverence, and sodomy, which was a term of contempt.

Logos

λόγοςWordWord of God
In Carl Jung's analytical psychology, the counterpart to eros is logos, a Greek term for the principle of rationality.
For Plotinus, the relationship between the three elements of his trinity is conducted by the outpouring of Logos from the higher principle, and eros (loving) upward from the lower principle.

The Four Loves

Four Loves
The Four Loves
Eros (erōs, Greek: ἔρως) for Lewis was love in the sense of "being in love" or "loving" someone, as opposed to the raw sexuality of what he called Venus: the illustration Lewis used was the distinction between "wanting a woman" and wanting one particular woman – something that matched his (classical) view of man as a rational animal, a composite both of reasoning angel and instinctual alley-cat.

Eros

erotesCupidAmor
This love passion was described through an elaborate metaphoric and mythological schema involving "love's arrows" or "love darts", the source of which was often the personified figure of Eros (or his Latin counterpart, Cupid), or another deity (such as Rumor ).
Eros (concept)

Greek words for love

Greek words for ''Loveancient Greek word for lovefive forms of love
Eros ( or ; érōs "love" or "desire") is one of the four ancient Greco-Christian terms which can be rendered into English as "love".

Love's Travel Stops & Country Stores

loveLove's Travel StopsLove's Travel Stop
Eros ( or ; érōs "love" or "desire") is one of the four ancient Greco-Christian terms which can be rendered into English as "love".

Storge

familialFamilial loveaffection
The other three are storge, philia, and agape.

Charity (virtue)

charityCaritaslove
Eros refers to "passionate love" or romantic love; storge to familial love; philia to friendship as a kind of love; and agape refers to "selfless love", or "charity" as it is translated in the Christian scriptures (from the Latin caritas, dearness).

Caritas

Eros refers to "passionate love" or romantic love; storge to familial love; philia to friendship as a kind of love; and agape refers to "selfless love", or "charity" as it is translated in the Christian scriptures (from the Latin caritas, dearness).

Philosophy

philosophicalphilosopherhistory of philosophy
The philosopher and sociologist Herbert Marcuse appropriated the Freudian concept of eros for his highly influential 1955 work Eros and Civilization. Eros has also been used in philosophy and psychology in a much wider sense, almost as an equivalent to "life energy".

Psychology

psychologicalpsychologistpsychologists
Eros has also been used in philosophy and psychology in a much wider sense, almost as an equivalent to "life energy".

Schema (psychology)

schemaschemasschemata
This love passion was described through an elaborate metaphoric and mythological schema involving "love's arrows" or "love darts", the source of which was often the personified figure of Eros (or his Latin counterpart, Cupid), or another deity (such as Rumor ).

Cupid

AmorAmoreCupids
This love passion was described through an elaborate metaphoric and mythological schema involving "love's arrows" or "love darts", the source of which was often the personified figure of Eros (or his Latin counterpart, Cupid), or another deity (such as Rumor ).

Pheme

FameFamaRumor
This love passion was described through an elaborate metaphoric and mythological schema involving "love's arrows" or "love darts", the source of which was often the personified figure of Eros (or his Latin counterpart, Cupid), or another deity (such as Rumor ).

Lovesickness

lovesickheartachelove sickness
If these arrows were to arrive at the lover's eyes, they would then travel to and 'pierce' or 'wound' his or her heart and overwhelm him/her with desire and longing (lovesickness).

Oxymoron

oxymoronica lot of old people knewalways assuming the moral high ground (which she seems to brag about)
The image of the "arrow's wound" was sometimes used to create oxymorons and rhetorical antithesis concerning its pleasure and pain.