Eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79

eruption of Mount Vesuviuseruption of Mount Vesuvius in AD 79eruption of Vesuviuseruptioneruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 ADAD 79 eruptionDestruction oferuption of Vesuvius in AD 79eruption of Vesuvius that destroyed PompeiiMount Vesuvius erupted
Mount Vesuvius, a stratovolcano in modern-day Italy, erupted in 79 AD in one of the deadliest volcanic eruptions in European history, which was witnessed and documented by Pliny the Younger, a Roman administrator and poet.wikipedia
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Stratovolcano

stratovolcanoescomposite volcanostratovolcanic
Mount Vesuvius, a stratovolcano in modern-day Italy, erupted in 79 AD in one of the deadliest volcanic eruptions in European history, which was witnessed and documented by Pliny the Younger, a Roman administrator and poet.
Two famous examples of stratovolcanoes are Krakatoa in Indonesia, known for its catastrophic eruption in 1883 and Vesuvius in Italy, whose catastrophic eruption in AD 79 ruined the Roman cities of Pompeii and Herculaneum.

List of volcanic eruptions by death toll

deadliest volcanic eruption8th deadliest volcanic eruption of the 20th centuryDeadliest eruption
Mount Vesuvius, a stratovolcano in modern-day Italy, erupted in 79 AD in one of the deadliest volcanic eruptions in European history, which was witnessed and documented by Pliny the Younger, a Roman administrator and poet.

Pliny the Younger

PlinyPliniusyounger Pliny
Mount Vesuvius, a stratovolcano in modern-day Italy, erupted in 79 AD in one of the deadliest volcanic eruptions in European history, which was witnessed and documented by Pliny the Younger, a Roman administrator and poet.
When Pliny the Younger was 17 or 18, his uncle Pliny the Elder died attempting to rescue victims of the Vesuvius eruption, and the terms of the Elder Pliny's will passed his estate to his nephew.

Pompeii

PompeianPompeii, ItalyPompei
Several Roman settlements were obliterated and buried underneath massive pyroclastic surges and ashfall deposits, the best known being Pompeii and Herculaneum.
Pompeii, along with Herculaneum and many villas in the surrounding area (e.g. at Boscoreale, Stabiae), was buried under 4 to 6 m of volcanic ash and pumice in the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in AD 79.

Herculaneum

HerculanumErcolanoHercolaneum
Several Roman settlements were obliterated and buried underneath massive pyroclastic surges and ashfall deposits, the best known being Pompeii and Herculaneum. Herculaneum and Oplontis received the brunt of the surges and were buried in fine pyroclastic deposits, pulverized pumice and lava fragments.
Like its sister city, Pompeii, Herculaneum is famous for having been buried in ash, along with Stabiae, Oplontis and Boscoreale, during the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in AD 79.

Italy

ItalianITAItalia
Mount Vesuvius, a stratovolcano in modern-day Italy, erupted in 79 AD in one of the deadliest volcanic eruptions in European history, which was witnessed and documented by Pliny the Younger, a Roman administrator and poet.
The last is the only active volcano in mainland Europe and is most famous for the destruction of Pompeii and Herculanum in the eruption in 79 AD.

62 Pompeii earthquake

earthquake of 62 CEearthquake of 62 AD62 AD earthquake
The 79 AD eruption was preceded by a powerful earthquake seventeen years before on February 5, 62 AD, which caused widespread destruction around the Bay of Naples, and particularly to Pompeii.
The earthquake may have been a precursor to the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in AD 79, which destroyed the same two towns.

Mount Vesuvius

VesuviusMt. VesuviusVesuvio
Mount Vesuvius, a stratovolcano in modern-day Italy, erupted in 79 AD in one of the deadliest volcanic eruptions in European history, which was witnessed and documented by Pliny the Younger, a Roman administrator and poet.
The eruption of Mount Vesuvius in AD 79 destroyed the Roman cities of Pompeii, Herculaneum, Oplontis and Stabiae, as well as several other settlements.

Plinian eruption

PlinianPlinian eruptionsUltra Plinian
The event is the namesake for the Vesuvian type of volcanic eruptions, characterized by eruption columns of hot gases and ash exploding into the stratosphere, although the event also included pyroclastic flows associated with Pelean eruptions.
Plinian eruptions or Vesuvian eruptions are volcanic eruptions marked by their similarity to the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 AD, which destroyed the ancient Roman cities of Herculaneum and Pompeii.

Rectina

The authors suggest that the first ash falls are to be interpreted as early-morning, low-volume explosions not seen from Misenum, causing Rectina to send her messenger on a ride of several hours around the Bay of Naples, then passable, providing an answer to the paradox of how the messenger might miraculously appear at Pliny's villa so shortly after a distant eruption that would have prevented him.
During the eruption of Vesuvius in 79 CE, Pliny received a message from her, which prompted him to set sail with galleys and a cutter to observe what was happening at closer range, and to attempt to rescue some of the people of the towns at the foot of the volcano.

Pliny the Elder

PlinyPlin.Plinius
Pliny's uncle Pliny the Elder was in command of the Roman fleet at Misenum, and had meanwhile decided to investigate the phenomenon at close hand in a light vessel.
Pliny the Elder died in AD 79 in Stabiae while attempting the rescue of a friend and his family by ship from the eruption of Mount Vesuvius, which had already destroyed the cities of Pompeii and Herculaneum.

Oplontis

OplontiTorre Annunziata
Herculaneum and Oplontis received the brunt of the surges and were buried in fine pyroclastic deposits, pulverized pumice and lava fragments.
Like the nearby towns of Pompeii and Herculaneum, Oplontis was buried in ash during the volcanic eruption of Mount Vesuvius in AD 79.

Pyroclastic flow

pyroclastic flowspyroclasticash flow
At some time in the night or early the next day, pyroclastic flows in the close vicinity of the volcano began.

Drusilla (daughter of Herod Agrippa)

DrusillaDrusilla (daughter of Herod Agrippa I)Drusilla of Judea
Along with Pliny the Elder, the only other notable casualties of the eruption to be known by name were the Jewish princess Drusilla and her son Agrippa, who was born in her marriage with the procurator Antonius Felix.
She perished in the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in AD 79.

Titus

Emperor TitusTitus Flavius Vespasianusthe Emperor
For example, Josephus in his Antiquities of the Jews mentions that the eruption occurred "in the days of Titus Caesar."
As emperor, Titus is best known for completing the Colosseum and for his generosity in relieving the suffering caused by two disasters, the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in AD 79 and a fire in Rome in 80.

Pomponianus

Tascius
Advised by the helmsman to turn back he stated "Fortune favors the brave" and ordered him to continue on to Stabiae (about 4.5 km from Pompeii), where Pomponianus was.
Roman senator Pomponianus was at Stabiae during the Eruption of Mount Vesuvius in AD 79, he was stuck to the shore because he was not favoured by the wind, so was greeted by Pliny The Elder in order to help him escape the increasing danger.

AD 79

7979 AD
For the past five centuries, articles about the eruption of Vesuvius have typically indicated that the event began on August 24 of 79 AD.

The Destruction of Pompeii and Herculaneum

The painting is a monumental canvas 161.6 cm by 253.0 cm which depicts a view from Stabiae across the Bay of Naples towards the doomed cities of Pompeii and Herculaneum during the eruption of Vesuvius in AD 79.

Caesius Bassus

Bassus
It is also said that the poet Caesius Bassus died in the eruption.
He is said to have lost his life in the eruption of Vesuvius in AD 79 and to have been the husband of Rectina.

Eruption column

ash columnplumeash plume
Mount Vesuvius violently spewed forth a deadly cloud of super-heated tephra and gases to a height of 33 km, ejecting molten rock, pulverized pumice and hot ash at 1.5 million tons per second, ultimately releasing 100,000 times the thermal energy of the Hiroshima-Nagasaki bombings.

Tephra

pyroclastpyroclasticpyroclastic material
Mount Vesuvius violently spewed forth a deadly cloud of super-heated tephra and gases to a height of 33 km, ejecting molten rock, pulverized pumice and hot ash at 1.5 million tons per second, ultimately releasing 100,000 times the thermal energy of the Hiroshima-Nagasaki bombings.

Volcanic gas

gasgasesgaseous content
Mount Vesuvius violently spewed forth a deadly cloud of super-heated tephra and gases to a height of 33 km, ejecting molten rock, pulverized pumice and hot ash at 1.5 million tons per second, ultimately releasing 100,000 times the thermal energy of the Hiroshima-Nagasaki bombings.

Lava

lava flowlava flowspahoehoe
Mount Vesuvius violently spewed forth a deadly cloud of super-heated tephra and gases to a height of 33 km, ejecting molten rock, pulverized pumice and hot ash at 1.5 million tons per second, ultimately releasing 100,000 times the thermal energy of the Hiroshima-Nagasaki bombings.

Pumice

pumice stonePumicitepumiceous
Mount Vesuvius violently spewed forth a deadly cloud of super-heated tephra and gases to a height of 33 km, ejecting molten rock, pulverized pumice and hot ash at 1.5 million tons per second, ultimately releasing 100,000 times the thermal energy of the Hiroshima-Nagasaki bombings.

Volcanic ash

ashash cloudash fall
Mount Vesuvius violently spewed forth a deadly cloud of super-heated tephra and gases to a height of 33 km, ejecting molten rock, pulverized pumice and hot ash at 1.5 million tons per second, ultimately releasing 100,000 times the thermal energy of the Hiroshima-Nagasaki bombings.