Endoscopic image of an esophageal adenocarcinoma
The digestive tract, with the esophagus marked in red
A chest X-ray showing achalasia ( arrows point to the outline of the massively dilated esophagus )
Esophageal cancer (lower part) as a result of Barrettʼs esophagus
The esophagus is constricted in three places.
Transhiatal oesophagectomy specimen from a patient suffering from late-stage achalasia. Diverticulum at the left lower end of the oesophagus.
Esophageal cancer as shown by a filling defect during an upper GI series
A mass seen during an endoscopy and an ultrasound of the mass conducted during the endoscopy session.
An axial CT image showing marked dilatation of the esophagus in a person with achalasia.
Esophageal stent for esophageal cancer
"Bird's beak" appearance and "megaesophagus", typical in achalasia.
Esophageal stent for esophageal cancer
Schematic of manometry in achalasia showing aperistaltic contractions, increased intraesophageal pressure, and failure of relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter.
Before and after a total esophagectomy
Image of a stomach which has undergone Fundoplomy
Typical scar lines after the two main methods of surgery
Death from esophageal cancer per million persons in 2012
Endoscopic image of Barrett esophagus – a frequent precursor of esophageal adenocarcinoma
Endoscopy and radial endoscopic ultrasound images of a submucosal tumor in the central portion of the esophagus
Contrast CT scan showing an esophageal tumor (axial view)
Contrast CT scan showing an esophageal tumor (coronal view)
Esophageal cancer
Micrograph showing histopathological appearance of an esophageal adenocarcinoma (dark blue – upper-left of image) and normal squamous epithelium (upper-right of image) at H&E staining
T1, T2, and T3 stages of esophageal cancer
Stage T4 esophageal cancer
Esophageal cancer with spread to lymph nodes
Internal radiotherapy for esophageal cancer
Self-expandable metallic stents are sometimes used for palliative care

Esophageal cancer is cancer arising from the esophagus—the food pipe that runs between the throat and the stomach.

- Esophageal cancer

Esophageal achalasia, often referred to simply as achalasia, is a failure of smooth muscle fibers to relax, which can cause the lower esophageal sphincter to remain closed.

- Esophageal achalasia

The esophagus may be affected by gastric reflux, cancer, prominent dilated blood vessels called varices that can bleed heavily, tears, constrictions, and disorders of motility.

- Esophagus

However, a small proportion occurs secondary to other conditions, such as esophageal cancer, Chagas disease (an infectious disease common in South America) or Triple-A syndrome.

- Esophageal achalasia

Achalasia (i.e. lack of the involuntary reflex in the esophagus after swallowing) appears to be a risk factor for both main types of esophageal cancer, at least in men, due to stagnation of trapped food and drink.

- Esophageal cancer

Achalasia refers to a failure of the lower esophageal sphincter to relax properly, and generally develops later in life.

- Esophagus
Endoscopic image of an esophageal adenocarcinoma

2 related topics with Alpha

Overall

The digestive tract, with the esophagus marked in red

Dysphagia

0 links

Difficulty in swallowing.

Difficulty in swallowing.

The digestive tract, with the esophagus marked in red

Achalasia is a major exception to usual pattern of dysphagia in that swallowing of fluid tends to cause more difficulty than swallowing solids.

In achalasia, there is idiopathic destruction of parasympathetic ganglia of the Auerbach's (Myenteric) plexus of the entire esophagus, which results in functional narrowing of the lower esophagus, and peristaltic failure throughout its length.

Esophageal cancer

Surgical removal of the esophagus.

Esophagectomy

0 links

Surgical removal of the esophagus.
Diagram showing before and after an oesophago-gastrectomy
Diagram showing before and after a partial oesophagectomy
Diagram showing before and after a total oesophagectomy
An esophagectomy using the bowel (colon) to replace the esophagus

Esophagectomy or oesophagectomy is the surgical removal of all or parts of the esophagus.

This procedure is usually done for patients with esophageal cancer.

Esophagectomy is also occasionally performed for benign disease such as esophageal atresia in children, achalasia, or caustic injury.