A report on Vagus nerveEsophagus and Vomiting

Plan of the upper portions of the glossopharyngeal, vagus, and accessory nerves.
The digestive tract, with the esophagus marked in red
14th-century illustration of vomiting from the Casanatense Tacuinum Sanitatis
H&E stained fibers of the vagus nerve (bottom right) innervate the sinoatrial node tissue (middle left)
The esophagus is constricted in three places.
14th-century illustration of vomiting from the Casanatense Tacuinum Sanitatis
Inferior view of the human brain, with the cranial nerves labeled.
A mass seen during an endoscopy and an ultrasound of the mass conducted during the endoscopy session.
Vomiting
Section of the neck at about the level of the sixth cervical vertebra
Partially digested food, with man-sized glove for scale
Transverse section of thorax, showing relations of pulmonary artery
A drunk man vomiting, while a young slave is holding his forehead. Brygos Painter, 500–470 BC
The arch of the aorta, and its branches
Special bags are often supplied on boats for sick passengers to vomit into.
Dura mater and its processes exposed by removing part of the right half of the skull, and the brain
The tracheobronchial lymph glands
Section of the medulla oblongata at about the middle of the olive
Hind- and mid-brains; postero-lateral view
Upper part of medulla spinalis and hind- and mid-brains; posterior aspect, exposed in situ
The right sympathetic chain and its connections with the thoracic, abdominal, and pelvic plexuses
The celiac ganglia with the sympathetic plexuses of the abdominal viscera radiating from the ganglia
The position and relation of the esophagus in the cervical region and in the posterior mediastinum, seen from behind
The thyroid gland and its relations
The thymus of a full-term fetus, exposed in situ
Deep dissection of vagus nerve
Vagus nerve – dissection

The right vagus nerve gives rise to the right recurrent laryngeal nerve, which hooks around the right subclavian artery and ascends into the neck between the trachea and esophagus.

- Vagus nerve

Its smooth muscle is innervated by involuntary nerves (sympathetic nerves via the sympathetic trunk and parasympathetic nerves via the vagus nerve) and in addition voluntary nerves (lower motor neurons) which are carried in the vagus nerve to innervate its striated muscle.

- Esophagus

Repeated or profuse vomiting may cause erosions to the esophagus or small tears in the esophageal mucosa (Mallory–Weiss tear).

- Vomiting

The cranial nerve X (vagus nerve) is activated when the pharynx is irritated, leading to a gag reflex.

- Vomiting

In addition, 5-HT3 receptor-mediated afferent vagus stimulation in the gut due to gastroenteritis is a cause of vomiting.

- Vagus nerve

This and the oblique angle at which the esophagus connects to the stomach explains why horses cannot vomit.

- Esophagus
Plan of the upper portions of the glossopharyngeal, vagus, and accessory nerves.

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