Esquire

Esq.EsqArmigeras late as 1894escuderoEsquEsquiresgentryÉcuyer
Esquire (, US also ; abbreviated Esq.) is usually a courtesy title.wikipedia
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Landed gentry

landownergentrylanded
In the United Kingdom, Esquire historically was a title of respect accorded to men of higher social rank, particularly members of the landed gentry above the rank of gentleman and below the rank of knight.

Heraldic visitation

Heraldic VisitationsHeralds' Visitationsvisitation
From the 16th century such families were defined by the inclusion of their pedigrees within their county's heraldic visitations, which necessitated their submitting a return of their pedigree to the visiting herald at the specified location, generally one of the chief towns of the county.
He was also required to enquire into all those using the titles of knight, esquire, or gentleman and decided if they were being lawfully used.

Suffix (name)

suffixJuniorPère
In letters, a lawyer is customarily addressed by adding the suffix Esquire (abbreviated Esq.), preceded by a comma, after the lawyer's full name.
The style Esq. or Esquire was once used to distinguish a man who was an apprentice to a knight and is used for a man of socially high ranking.

White Spur (esquire)

Whit SpurrsWhite Spur
The historic title White Spur (alias Silver Spur ) was a rare variety of English esquire in Devonshire (and possibly the wider West Country).

Esquire of the Body

Knight of the BodyEsquires of the BodyEsquire of the King's Body
By the time of Henry VIII, the position holders were usually knights (who were entitled to the help of two esquires and a page boy), of which at least two would always be in attendance on the King.

Lawyer

attorneylawyersattorneys
In the United States, Esquire is mostly used to denote a lawyer in a departure from traditional use and is irrespective of gender.
(for "Esquire").

Mr.

MrMisterMessrs.
Later examples appear in the list of subscribers to The History of Elton, by the Rev. Rose Fuller Whistler, published in 1892, which distinguishes between subscribers designated Mr (another way of indicating gentlemen) and those allowed Esquire.
In the 19th century and earlier, in Britain, two gradations of 'gentleman' were recognised; the higher was entitled to use 'esquire' (usually abbreviated to Esq, which followed the name), while the lower employed 'Mr' before the name.

Gentleman

gentlemenGent.Caballero
In the United Kingdom, Esquire historically was a title of respect accorded to men of higher social rank, particularly members of the landed gentry above the rank of gentleman and below the rank of knight.
Originally, a gentleman was the lowest rank of the landed gentry of England, ranking below an esquire and above a yeoman; by definition, the rank of gentleman comprised the younger sons of the younger sons of peers, and the younger sons of a baronet, a knight, and an esquire, in perpetual succession.

Barrister

Barrister-at-Lawbarristersbar
Barristers were especially included in the order of the esquires.
Some honorific suffixes to signify notable barristers may be Esquire.

Armiger

armigerousde armisarmigers
By the end of the 16th century, the pretentious use of the title, especially in its Latin form, Armiger, was being mocked by Shakespeare in his character Robert Shallow, esquire, a Justice of the Peace:
In high and late medieval England, the word referred to an esquire attendant upon a knight, but bearing his own unique armorial device.

Gentry

genteelgentlemanlanded gentry
Although esquire is the English translation of the French écuyer, the latter indicated legal membership in the nobilities of ancien régime France and contemporaneous Belgium, whereas an esquire belongs to the British gentry rather than to its nobility, albeit that "gentry" in England means untitled nobility.
Esquire (abbreviated Esq.) is a term derived from the French "écuyer" (which also gave equerry) the lowest designation for a nobleman, referring only to males, and used to denote a high but indeterminate social status.

English honorifics

English honorifichonorifichonorifics in modern English
*English honorifics

Lord of the manor

lords of the manorlordlordship of the manor
15, p. 228). (By Armes he referred to a coat of arms; it is not clear from this quotation whether Segar made a distinction between esquires and gentlemen.) For example, lords of the manor hold the rank of esquire by prescription.
The status of lord of the manor is associated with the rank of esquire by prescription.

Order of precedence in Scotland

Order of PrecedenceprecedenceScotland
Today, being an armiger is synonymous with the title of gentleman within the Order of Precedence in Scotland, and is a social dignity.

Noblesse

nobiliaires
Instead the French term of noblesse has been used by the Court of the Lord Lyon as this term not only includes peers but also the non-peerage minor-nobility, which includes baronets, knights, feudal barons, armigers with territorial designations, esquires and gentlemen.
It includes the untitled and minor nobility - the noblesse, to whom rightly belong lairds (those with territorial designations), Esquires and Gentlemen, "known" through the grant or matriculation of armorial bearings.

Courtesy title

courtesystyledcourtesy titles
Esquire (, US also ; abbreviated Esq.) is usually a courtesy title.

United Kingdom

BritishUKBritain
In the United Kingdom, Esquire historically was a title of respect accorded to men of higher social rank, particularly members of the landed gentry above the rank of gentleman and below the rank of knight.

Knight

knighthoodknightedknights
In the United Kingdom, Esquire historically was a title of respect accorded to men of higher social rank, particularly members of the landed gentry above the rank of gentleman and below the rank of knight.

William Blackstone

BlackstoneSir William BlackstoneBlackstone, Sir William
In 1826, William Blackstone reiterated that, "the title should be limited to those only who bear an office of trust under the Crown and who are styled esquires by the king in their commissions and appointments; and all, I conceive, who are once honoured by the king with the title of esquire have a right to that distinction for life."

The Crown

British CrownCrownAustralian Crown
In 1826, William Blackstone reiterated that, "the title should be limited to those only who bear an office of trust under the Crown and who are styled esquires by the king in their commissions and appointments; and all, I conceive, who are once honoured by the king with the title of esquire have a right to that distinction for life."

Order of precedence

precedenceorders of precedencerank
In certain formal contexts, it remains an indication of a social status that is recognised in the order of precedence.

United States

AmericanU.S.USA
In the United States, Esquire is mostly used to denote a lawyer in a departure from traditional use and is irrespective of gender.

Letter (message)

letterslettercorrespondence
In letters, a lawyer is customarily addressed by adding the suffix Esquire (abbreviated Esq.), preceded by a comma, after the lawyer's full name.

Comma

,commascomma below
In letters, a lawyer is customarily addressed by adding the suffix Esquire (abbreviated Esq.), preceded by a comma, after the lawyer's full name.

Edward Coke

Sir Edward CokeCokeLord Coke
Chief Justice Coke (1552–1634) defined "gentlemen" as those who bear coat armour.