Esquire (magazine)

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Esquire is a long-running American men's magazine.wikipedia
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Hearst Communications

Hearst CorporationHearstHearst Newspapers
In the United States it is published by the Hearst Corporation since 1986, also having over 20 international editions.
Hearst owns newspapers, magazines, television channels, and television stations, including the San Francisco Chronicle, the Houston Chronicle, Cosmopolitan and Esquire.

Arnold Gingrich

Arnold Gingrich’s
Founded in 1933, it flourished during the Great Depression and World War II under the guidance of founders Arnold Gingrich, David A. Smart and Henry L. Jackson while during the 1960s it pioneered the "new journalism" movement.
Arnold W. Gingrich (December 5, 1903 – July 9, 1976) was the editor of, and, along with publisher David A. Smart and Henry L. Jackson, co-founder of Esquire magazine.

David A. Smart

Founded in 1933, it flourished during the Great Depression and World War II under the guidance of founders Arnold Gingrich, David A. Smart and Henry L. Jackson while during the 1960s it pioneered the "new journalism" movement.
David Archibald Smart (October 4, 1892 – October 15, 1952), co-founder of Esquire magazine, and, with his brother Alfred Smart (1895-1951), co-publisher of Esquire and Coronet.

Henry L. Jackson

Founded in 1933, it flourished during the Great Depression and World War II under the guidance of founders Arnold Gingrich, David A. Smart and Henry L. Jackson while during the 1960s it pioneered the "new journalism" movement.
Henry L. Jackson (March 24, 1911 – June 17, 1948) was an American businessman, editor and journalist and a co-founder of Esquire magazine with David A. Smart and Arnold Gingrich.

George Petty

Petty GirlPettyPetty Girls
In the 1940s, the popularity of the Petty Girls and Vargas Girls provided a circulation boost.
His pin-up art appeared primarily in Esquire and Fawcett Publications's True but was also in calendars marketed by Esquire, True and Ridgid Tool Company.

Coronet (magazine)

CoronetCoronet MagazineCoronet'' (magazine)
Smart died in 1952, although he left Esquire in 1936 to found a different magazine for the company, Coronet.
The magazine was owned by Esquire and published by David A. Smart from 1936 to 1961.

E. Simms Campbell

Beginning with its second number, a blond, pop-eyed, mustachioed character named "Esky" (created by cartoonists E. Simms Campbell and Sam Berman), graced almost every Esquire front page for over a quarter of a century, depicting the refined character of the magazine and its readership, mostly in the form of figurines, although during the 1950s, an stylized design of his face would often appear.
He was the first African-American cartoonist published in nationally distributed slick magazines, and he was the creator of Esky, the familiar pop-eyed mascot of Esquire.

Harold Hayes

Harold T. P. HayesHarold T.P. Hayes
Under Harold Hayes, who ran it from 1961 to 1973, Esquire became as distinctive as its oversized pages, helping pioneer the trend of New Journalism by publishing such writers as Norman Mailer, Tim O'Brien, John Sack, Gay Talese, Tom Wolfe, and Terry Southern.
Harold Thomas Pace Hayes (April 18, 1926 – April 5, 1989), editor of Esquire magazine from 1963 to 1973, was a main architect of the New Journalism movement.

Gay Talese

Talese, Gay
Under Harold Hayes, who ran it from 1961 to 1973, Esquire became as distinctive as its oversized pages, helping pioneer the trend of New Journalism by publishing such writers as Norman Mailer, Tim O'Brien, John Sack, Gay Talese, Tom Wolfe, and Terry Southern.
As a journalist for The New York Times and Esquire magazine during the 1960s, Talese helped to define literary journalism.

Terry Southern

Under Harold Hayes, who ran it from 1961 to 1973, Esquire became as distinctive as its oversized pages, helping pioneer the trend of New Journalism by publishing such writers as Norman Mailer, Tim O'Brien, John Sack, Gay Talese, Tom Wolfe, and Terry Southern.
He is credited by journalist Tom Wolfe as having invented New Journalism with the publication of "Twirling at Ole Miss" in Esquire in February 1963.

F. Scott Fitzgerald

Scott FitzgeraldFitzgeraldFrancis Scott Fitzgerald
However, demand was so high that by its second issue (January 1934), it transformed itself into a more refined periodical with an emphasis on men's fashion and contributions by Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Alberto Moravia, André Gide, and Julian Huxley.
Like most professional authors at the time, Fitzgerald supplemented his income by writing short stories for such magazines as The Saturday Evening Post, Collier's Weekly, and Esquire, and sold his stories and novels to Hollywood studios.

New Journalism

New Journalistsparticipatory journalismThe New Journalism
Under Harold Hayes, who ran it from 1961 to 1973, Esquire became as distinctive as its oversized pages, helping pioneer the trend of New Journalism by publishing such writers as Norman Mailer, Tim O'Brien, John Sack, Gay Talese, Tom Wolfe, and Terry Southern.
Articles in the New Journalism style tended not to be found in newspapers, but rather in magazines such as The Atlantic Monthly, Harper's, CoEvolution Quarterly, Esquire, New York, The New Yorker, Rolling Stone, and for a short while in the early 1970s, Scanlan's Monthly.

Norman Mailer

MailerThe Prisoner of SexMailer, Norman
Under Harold Hayes, who ran it from 1961 to 1973, Esquire became as distinctive as its oversized pages, helping pioneer the trend of New Journalism by publishing such writers as Norman Mailer, Tim O'Brien, John Sack, Gay Talese, Tom Wolfe, and Terry Southern.
Mailer wrote his fourth novel, An American Dream, as a serial in Esquire magazine over eight months (January to August 1964), publishing the first chapter two months after he wrote it.

United Airlines Flight 624

crash of United Airlines Flight 624Flight 624United Air Lines Flight 624
Jackson died in the crash of United Airlines Flight 624 in 1948, while Gingrich led the magazine until his own death in 1976.
Among the passengers were Broadway theatre impresario Earl Carroll and his girlfriend, actress Beryl Wallace; Henry L. Jackson, men's fashion editor of Collier's Weekly magazine and co-founder of Esquire Magazine; and Venita Varden Oakie, the former wife of actor Jack Oakie.

GQ

GQ MagazineBritish GQGentlemen's Quarterly
Esquire was first issued in October 1933 as an offshoot of trade magazine Apparel Arts (which later became Gentleman's Quarterly; both Esquire and GQ would share common ownership for almost 45 years).
The popularity of the magazine among retail customers, who often took the magazine from the retailers, spurred the creation of Esquire magazine in 1933.

Alberto Vargas

Vargas GirlVargasVargas girls
In the 1940s, the popularity of the Petty Girls and Vargas Girls provided a circulation boost.
He became widely noted in the 1940s as the creator of iconic World War-II era pin-ups for Esquire magazine known as "Vargas Girls."

Cal Fussman

Its award-winning staff writers include Tom Chiarella, Scott Raab, Mike Sager, Chris Jones, John H. Richardson, Cal Fussman, Lisa Taddeo, and Tom Junod.
He is a Writer at Large for Esquire magazine, known for the What I've Learned column, where he interviews leaders in various fields, which have included Mikhail Gorbachev, Jimmy Carter, Ted Kennedy, Jeff Bezos, Richard Branson, Jack Welch, Robert De Niro, Clint Eastwood, Al Pacino, George Clooney, Leonardo DiCaprio, Tom Hanks, Bruce Springsteen, Dr. Dre, Quincy Jones, Woody Allen, Barbara Walters, Pelé, Yao Ming, Serena Williams, John Wooden, and Muhammad Ali.

Mike Sager

The Sager Group
Its award-winning staff writers include Tom Chiarella, Scott Raab, Mike Sager, Chris Jones, John H. Richardson, Cal Fussman, Lisa Taddeo, and Tom Junod.
A former Washington Post staff writer, Rolling Stone contributing editor, and writer for GQ, Sager has been a writer for Esquire for more than two decades.

Gleb Derujinsky

Famous photographers have also worked for the magazine, among which fashion photographer Gleb Derujinsky, and Richard Avedon.
He worked for Esquire, Look, Life, Glamour, Town and Country and The New York Times Magazine, before shooting extensively for Harper’s Bazaar.

David M. Granger

David Granger
David M. Granger was named editor-in-chief of the magazine in June 1997.
David Granger (born October 31, 1956) was named editor-in-chief of Esquire Magazine in June 1997 and served in that capacity until March 31, 2016, when he was replaced by Jay Fielden.

Tom Wolfe

Wolfe, Tomauthor of the same nameThomas Kennerly Wolfe
Under Harold Hayes, who ran it from 1961 to 1973, Esquire became as distinctive as its oversized pages, helping pioneer the trend of New Journalism by publishing such writers as Norman Mailer, Tim O'Brien, John Sack, Gay Talese, Tom Wolfe, and Terry Southern.
During the 1962–63 New York City newspaper strike, Wolfe approached Esquire magazine about an article on the hot rod and custom car culture of southern California.

Scott Raab

Its award-winning staff writers include Tom Chiarella, Scott Raab, Mike Sager, Chris Jones, John H. Richardson, Cal Fussman, Lisa Taddeo, and Tom Junod.
Scott Raab (born March 21, 1952 ) is an American nonfiction author and former contributing journalist for Esquire.

Clay Felker

The magazine was sold by the original owners to Clay Felker in 1977 (although Esquire Inc. kept its name until its acquisition by Gulf + Western in 1983).
He was on the development team for Sports Illustrated and was features editor for Esquire.

John Sack

Under Harold Hayes, who ran it from 1961 to 1973, Esquire became as distinctive as its oversized pages, helping pioneer the trend of New Journalism by publishing such writers as Norman Mailer, Tim O'Brien, John Sack, Gay Talese, Tom Wolfe, and Terry Southern.
His work appeared in such periodicals as Harper's, The Atlantic, Esquire and The New Yorker.

Tom Chiarella

Its award-winning staff writers include Tom Chiarella, Scott Raab, Mike Sager, Chris Jones, John H. Richardson, Cal Fussman, Lisa Taddeo, and Tom Junod.
Tom Chiarella is Hampton and Esther Boswell Distinguished University Professor of Creative Writing at DePauw University and writer-at-large and fiction editor of Esquire Magazine.