Ethics of eating meat

ethicalethical vegetarianeating meatarguments for veganismconsequences of meat consumptionecologyethical complaints regarding dairy productionethical meat eatingethical reasons for avoiding dairyethical reasons regarding dairy production
The question of whether it is right to eat animal flesh is among the most prominent topics in food ethics.wikipedia
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Meat

meatsmeat consumptionprocessed meat
The most commonly given moral objection to meat-eating is that, for most people living in the developed world, it is not necessary for survival or health; some argue that slaughtering animals solely because people enjoy the taste of meat is wrong and morally unjustifiable.
Many religions have rules about which meat may or may not be eaten, and vegetarian people abstain from eating meat because of concerns about the ethics of eating meat or about the effects of meat production or consumption.

Vegetarianism

vegetarianvegetariansvegetarian diet
Ethical vegetarians and ethical vegans may also object to the practices underlying the production of meat, or cite their concerns about animal welfare, animal rights, environmental ethics, and religious reasons.
Many people object to eating meat out of respect for sentient life.

Utilitarianism

utilitarianutilitariansutilitarian ethics
In Animal Liberation, Singer argued that, because non-human animals feel, they should be treated according to utilitarian ethics.
It has been applied to social welfare economics, the crisis of global poverty, the ethics of raising animals for food and the importance of avoiding existential risks to humanity.

Vegetarianism and religion

religiousreligious beliefsreligious prohibition of beef consumption
Ethical vegetarians and ethical vegans may also object to the practices underlying the production of meat, or cite their concerns about animal welfare, animal rights, environmental ethics, and religious reasons.
Ethics of vegetarianism

Dairy product

dairy productsdairymilk products
Peter Singer—Princeton University and University of Melbourne professor and pioneer of the animal liberation movement— has long argued that, if it is possible to survive and be healthy without eating meat, fish, dairy, or eggs, one ought to choose that option instead of causing unnecessary harm to animals.
Vegans – Veganism is the avoidance of all animal products, including dairy products, most often due to the ethics regarding how dairy products are produced. The ethical reasons for avoiding dairy include how dairy is produced, how the animals are handled, and the environmental effect of dairy production.

Jewish vegetarianism

Jewish vegetarianvegetarianism
While it is neither required nor prohibited for Jews to eat meat, a number of medieval scholars of Judaism, such as Joseph Albo and Isaac Arama, regard vegetarianism as a moral ideal.
There are several religious and philosophical arguments used by modern Jewish vegetarians regarding the ethics of eating meat.

Animal ethics

animalAnimal ethicistsanimal protection groups
Animal ethicists such as Gary Francione have argued that reducing animal suffering is not enough; it needs to be made illegal and abolished.
Ethics of eating meat

Dairy cattle

dairy cowsdairy cowdairy
To produce milk from dairy cattle, most calves are separated from their mothers soon after birth and fed milk replacement in order to retain the cows' milk for human consumption.
Some of the ethical reasons regarding dairy production cited include how often the dairy cattle are impregnated, the separation of calves from their mothers, and the fact that the cows are considered "spent" and culled at a relatively young age, as well as environmental concerns regarding dairy production.

Ethical omnivorism

Ethical omnivorism
This diet tries to increase consumer support for more ethical meat production with the aim that it might be able to give incentive for more restaurants and stores to use ethical sources.

Veganism

veganvegansvegan diet
Ethical vegetarians and ethical vegans may also object to the practices underlying the production of meat, or cite their concerns about animal welfare, animal rights, environmental ethics, and religious reasons.

Animal husbandry

husbandrybreedingcattle breeding
Ethical vegetarians and ethical vegans may also object to the practices underlying the production of meat, or cite their concerns about animal welfare, animal rights, environmental ethics, and religious reasons.

Animal welfare

welfareanimal protectionanimal rescue
Ethical vegetarians and ethical vegans may also object to the practices underlying the production of meat, or cite their concerns about animal welfare, animal rights, environmental ethics, and religious reasons.

Animal rights

animal rights activistrightsanimal rights activists
Ethical vegetarians and ethical vegans may also object to the practices underlying the production of meat, or cite their concerns about animal welfare, animal rights, environmental ethics, and religious reasons.

Environmental ethics

environmentalenvironmentenvironmental ethicist
Ethical vegetarians and ethical vegans may also object to the practices underlying the production of meat, or cite their concerns about animal welfare, animal rights, environmental ethics, and religious reasons.

Intensive animal farming

factory farmingfactory farmsfactory farm
Some meat-eaters only object to rearing animals in certain ways, such as in factory farms, or killing them with cruelty; others avoid only certain meats, such as veal or foie gras.

Veal

veal cratescalfmilk veal
Some meat-eaters only object to rearing animals in certain ways, such as in factory farms, or killing them with cruelty; others avoid only certain meats, such as veal or foie gras.

Foie gras

pâté de foie grasgoose liverDuck foie gras of the South-west
Some meat-eaters only object to rearing animals in certain ways, such as in factory farms, or killing them with cruelty; others avoid only certain meats, such as veal or foie gras.

Peter Singer

Singer, PeterProf Peter SingerSingerian
Peter Singer—Princeton University and University of Melbourne professor and pioneer of the animal liberation movement— has long argued that, if it is possible to survive and be healthy without eating meat, fish, dairy, or eggs, one ought to choose that option instead of causing unnecessary harm to animals.

Princeton University

PrincetonCollege of New JerseyPrinceton College
Peter Singer—Princeton University and University of Melbourne professor and pioneer of the animal liberation movement— has long argued that, if it is possible to survive and be healthy without eating meat, fish, dairy, or eggs, one ought to choose that option instead of causing unnecessary harm to animals.

University of Melbourne

Melbourne UniversityMelbourneThe University of Melbourne
Peter Singer—Princeton University and University of Melbourne professor and pioneer of the animal liberation movement— has long argued that, if it is possible to survive and be healthy without eating meat, fish, dairy, or eggs, one ought to choose that option instead of causing unnecessary harm to animals.

Egg as food

eggseggchicken egg
Peter Singer—Princeton University and University of Melbourne professor and pioneer of the animal liberation movement— has long argued that, if it is possible to survive and be healthy without eating meat, fish, dairy, or eggs, one ought to choose that option instead of causing unnecessary harm to animals.

Animal Liberation (book)

Animal Liberation1975 bookAnimal Liberation'' (book)
In Animal Liberation, Singer argued that, because non-human animals feel, they should be treated according to utilitarian ethics.

Free range

free-rangefree-rangingfree ranging
Less radical proponents argue that practices like well-managed free-range rearing and the consumption of hunted animals, particularly from species whose natural predators have been significantly eliminated, could satisfy the demand for mass-produced meat.

Food waste

kitchen wastegarbagewaste
Reducing the worldwide massive food waste would also contribute to reduce meat waste and therefore save animals.