Ethio-Djibouti Railways

Ethio-Djibouti RailwayFranco-Ethiopian RailwayAddis Ababa-Djibouti railroadImperial Railway Company of EthiopiaAddis Ababa – Djibouti RailwayAddis Ababa-Djibouti RailwayDjibouti–Addis Ababa railwayImperial Ethiopian RailwayRail transport in Djiboutirailway
The Ethio-Djibouti Railway (Chemin de Fer Djibouto-Éthiopien (C.D.E.) is a metre gauge railway in the Horn of Africa that once connected Addis Ababa to the port city of Djibouti.wikipedia
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Addis Ababa

Addis Ababa, EthiopiaAddis Abeba10 subcities
The Ethio-Djibouti Railway (Chemin de Fer Djibouto-Éthiopien (C.D.E.) is a metre gauge railway in the Horn of Africa that once connected Addis Ababa to the port city of Djibouti. The line connected the new Ethiopian capital city of Addis Ababa (1886) to the Port of Djibouti in French Somaliland, providing landlocked Ethiopia with railway access to the sea.
Along with Dire Dawa, the city had been spared the aerial bombardment (including the use of chemical weapons such as mustard gas) practiced elsewhere and its railway to Djibouti remained intact.

Djibouti (city)

Djibouti CityDjibouticity of Djibouti
The Ethio-Djibouti Railway (Chemin de Fer Djibouto-Éthiopien (C.D.E.) is a metre gauge railway in the Horn of Africa that once connected Addis Ababa to the port city of Djibouti.
The city later grew considerably in size following the construction of the Imperial Ethiopian Railway.

Dire Dawa

DiredawaDire DauaDire-Dawa
As of February 2018, a combined passenger and freight service runs two times a week between the Ethiopian city of Dire Dawa and the Djibouti border, stopping at Dewele (passengers) and Guelile (freight).
It owes its foundation to a technical problem: when it became impossible to lay the Addis Ababa-Djibouti Railway via Harar because of the steep access to the town, atse Menelik II accepted (in a later dated 5 November 1896) that the first part of the line might finish at a village at the foot of the mountains, which should be named Addis Harar ("New Harrar").

Djibouti

Republic of DjiboutiDjiboutianDjibuti
The railway is single track and stretched 784 km, of which about 100 km lay in Djibouti.
In the late 19th century, the colony of French Somaliland was established following treaties signed by the ruling Somali and Afar sultans with the French and its railroad to Dire Dawa (and later Addis Ababa) allowed it to quickly supersede Zeila as the port for southern Ethiopia and the Ogaden.

Addis Ababa–Djibouti Railway

Addis Ababa - Djibouti RailwayAddis Ababa-Djibouti RailwayAddis Ababa – Djibouti Railway
The railway has been mostly superseded by the Addis Ababa–Djibouti Railway, an electrified standard gauge railway that was completed in 2017.
The Addis Ababa–Djibouti Railway runs roughly parallel to the old metre-gauge Ethio–Djibouti Railway for most of its length.

Guelile

As of February 2018, a combined passenger and freight service runs two times a week between the Ethiopian city of Dire Dawa and the Djibouti border, stopping at Dewele (passengers) and Guelile (freight).
The area is served by a border post as well as by a train station at the Ethio-Djibouti Railways.

French Somaliland

French Somali CoastFrench SomaliaFrench
The railway was built in 1894–1917 to connect the Ethiopian capital city to French Somaliland. The line connected the new Ethiopian capital city of Addis Ababa (1886) to the Port of Djibouti in French Somaliland, providing landlocked Ethiopia with railway access to the sea.
The construction of the Imperial Ethiopian Railway west into Ethiopia turned the port of Djibouti into a boomtown of 15,000 at a time when Harar was the only city in Ethiopia to exceed that.

Port of Djibouti

DjiboutiDjiboutian Port AuthorityPort Autonome International de Djibouti PAID
The line connected the new Ethiopian capital city of Addis Ababa (1886) to the Port of Djibouti in French Somaliland, providing landlocked Ethiopia with railway access to the sea.
The port lost its direct railway access to Ethiopia when the Ethio-Djibouti Railway was abandoned.

Dewele

DewaleDouanlé
As of February 2018, a combined passenger and freight service runs two times a week between the Ethiopian city of Dire Dawa and the Djibouti border, stopping at Dewele (passengers) and Guelile (freight).
Dewele is served by a station on the Addis Ababa - Djibouti Railway as well as on the Ethio-Djibouti Railways.

Royal train

imperial traintrainDutch Royal Train
Emperor Haile Selassie of Ethiopia traveled on an imperial train, which consisted of two locomotives, a baggage car with a diesel generator, four imperial carriages for the emperor and his family (lounge, sleeping compartments, offices, kitchen and restaurant), two 1st class salon-sleeper cars for guests of the Royal family and government officials, and two 2nd passenger cars.
Emperor Menelik II was known to use a special first class saloon when travelling on the Franco-Ethiopian Railroad.

Legehar train station

Addis Ababa railway stationLa Gare
Dedicated railway stations with a single platform and station facilities for travellers were present at only three stations along the railway: Legehar train station, Dire Dawa, and Djibouti City.
Legehar train station (La Gare), was the main railway station in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, the terminal station of the metre-gauge Ethio-Djibouti Railway that connected Ethiopia's capital to the Port of Djibouti.

Chabelley

ChebeleChebelleChébélé
The Ethio-Djibouti Railways passes through the village.

Holhol

Holl-Holl
Holhol is served by a station on the meter gauge Ethio-Djibouti Railway.

Alfred Ilg

The company was founded by Alfred Ilg and headquartered in Paris, France.
He showed his competence as an engineer when planning and implementing the railway line from Djibouti to the capital.

Dukem

The 2007–2012 rehabilitation program funded by the European Union set up two factories in Ethiopia, one in Dukem for steel products and one in Dire Dawa for concrete sleepers.
Dukem is situated along the Addis Ababa - Dire Dawa highway and is a station on the Ethio-Djibouti Railway.

Railway stations in Ethiopia

stationEthiopiarailway station
Other stations were built for the in 2018 still operating metre gauge Ethio-Djibouti Railways, although this railway has officially been superseded by the new Addis Ababa-Djibouti Railway.

Rail transport in Ethiopia

National Railway Network of EthiopiaEthiopiaEthiopian National Railway Network
That century-old railway, built from 1897–1917, the Ethio-Djibouti Railway and its decades old rolling stock was eventually lacking spare parts and was partially closed down over a number of years after the end of the 20th century.

Mieso

There are plans to restore 150 km of tracks from Dire Dawa to Mieso.
By the 1930s, Mieso was the most important railway stations of the Franco-Ethiopian Railway between Dire Dawa and Awash.

Italian Ethiopia

EthiopiaItalian occupationItalian occupation of Ethiopia
Ethiopia's share in the railway was seized by the Italian government in the Second Italo-Abyssinian War (1936), but the Anglo-French company continued to operate during the Italian occupation.
The most important railway line in the African colonies of the Kingdom of Italy, the 784 km long Franco-Ethiopian Railway, was.

Dila, Ethiopia

DilaDilla
In 1960–1963, the Franco-Ethiopian Railways conducted surveys to extend the line 310 kilometers from Adama to Dilla.
The Imperial Railway Company of Ethiopia carried out surveys for extending the railway with a 310 km line from Adama to Dilla between 1960 and 1963.

Awash rail disaster

plunges into a ravine
In January 1985, the Awash rail disaster killed 429 passengers when their train derailed on the Awash River Bridge and fell into the gorge below.
The train was an express traveling from Dire Dawa to Addis Ababa on the rail line from Djibouti, with approximately 1,000 passengers.

Kunming–Haiphong railway

Kunming–Hai Phong RailwayYunnan–Vietnam RailwaySino-Vietnamese Railway

Metre-gauge railway

metre gaugemeter gaugemetre-gauge
The Ethio-Djibouti Railway (Chemin de Fer Djibouto-Éthiopien (C.D.E.) is a metre gauge railway in the Horn of Africa that once connected Addis Ababa to the port city of Djibouti.

Horn of Africa

HornSomali peninsulanortheastern Africa
The Ethio-Djibouti Railway (Chemin de Fer Djibouto-Éthiopien (C.D.E.) is a metre gauge railway in the Horn of Africa that once connected Addis Ababa to the port city of Djibouti.

International waters

high seasinternational waterwaymare liberum
During early operations, it provided landlocked Ethiopia with its only access to the sea.