Ethiopian eunuch

Ethiopian mana royal officiala treasury officialroyal officialThe Ethiopianthe treasurer
The Ethiopian eunuch is a figure in the New Testament of the Bible.wikipedia
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Philip the Evangelist

PhilipPhilip the DeaconSaint Philip the Evangelist
Philip the Evangelist was told by an angel to go to the road from Jerusalem to Gaza, and there he encountered the Ethiopian eunuch, the treasurer of the Candace, Queen of the Ethiopians (Ancient Greek: Κανδάκη, the "Candace" was the Meroitic language term for "queen" or possibly "royal woman").
He preached and reportedly performed miracles in Samaria, and met and baptised an Ethiopian man, a eunuch, on the road from Jerusalem to Gaza, traditionally marking the start of the Ethiopian Church.

Acts of the Apostles

ActsBook of ActsActs of Apostles
The story of his conversion to Christianity is recounted in Acts 8.

Kandake

CandaceCandace of MeroeCandace of Meroë
Philip the Evangelist was told by an angel to go to the road from Jerusalem to Gaza, and there he encountered the Ethiopian eunuch, the treasurer of the Candace, Queen of the Ethiopians (Ancient Greek: Κανδάκη, the "Candace" was the Meroitic language term for "queen" or possibly "royal woman").
In the New Testament of the Christian Bible, a treasury official of "Candace, queen of the Ethiopians", returning from a trip to Jerusalem, met with Philip the Evangelist:

Eunuch

eunuchscourt eunuchseunuchoid
Philip the Evangelist was told by an angel to go to the road from Jerusalem to Gaza, and there he encountered the Ethiopian eunuch, the treasurer of the Candace, Queen of the Ethiopians (Ancient Greek: Κανδάκη, the "Candace" was the Meroitic language term for "queen" or possibly "royal woman").
One of the earliest converts to Christianity was an Ethiopian eunuch who was a high court official of Candace the Queen of Ethiopia.

Isaiah 53

Suffering ServantIsaiah 53:2-53
Sitting in his chariot reading the Book of Isaiah, he was reading Isaiah 53:7-8.
One of the first claims in the New Testament that Isaiah 53 is a prophecy of Jesus comes from the Book of Acts, in which its author (who is also the author of Luke's Gospel ), describes a scene in which God commands Philip the Evangelist to approach an Ethiopian eunuch who is sitting in a chariot, reading aloud to himself from the Book of Isaiah.

Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church

Ethiopian Orthodox ChristianityEthiopian Orthodox ChurchEthiopian Orthodox
In Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo tradition he was referred to as Bachos and in Eastern Orthodox tradition he is known as an Ethiopian Jew with the name Simeon also called the Black, a name used in.
The earliest account of an Ethiopian converted to the faith in the New Testament books is a royal official baptized by Philip the Evangelist (distinct from Philip the Apostle), one of the seven deacons (Acts, 8:26–27):

Road to Emmaus appearance

Supper at EmmausRoad to EmmausMeeting at Emmaus
Robert O'Toole argues that the way Philip is taken away parallels the way Jesus disappears after he has been talking to the disciples on the road to Emmaus in Luke 24.
It has also been suggested that the Ethiopian eunuch story is a "much discussed parallel" to the Emmaus narrative, since there are some recognizable similarities between the two.

God-fearer

GodfearersGod-fearersGod-fearing
Modern scholarship tends to place the Ethiopian eunuch in the "intermediate position between Jew and Gentile."
Lydia of Thyatira, who became Paul's first convert in Europe, is described as "a worshipper of God" ; the Roman soldier Cornelius and the Ethiopian eunuch are also considered by modern scholars as God-fearers.

Cornelius the Centurion

CorneliusCenturion CorneliusConversion of Cornelius
C. K. Barrett contrasts the Ethiopian eunuch's story with that of Cornelius the Centurion, another convert.
The baptism of Cornelius is an important event in the history of the early Christian church, along with the conversion and baptism of the Ethiopian eunuch.

Ebed-Melech

There are literary parallels between the story of the Ethiopian eunuch in Acts and that of Ebed-Melech, an Ethiopian eunuch in the Book of Jeremiah.
There are parallels between the story of Ebed-Melech and that of the Ethiopian eunuch in the Acts of the Apostles.

Early centers of Christianity

JerusalemJerusalem churchAntioch
Frank M. Snowden, Jr., interpret the story as emphasizing that early Christian communities accepted members regardless of race: "Ethiopians were the yardstick by which antiquity measured colored peoples."
Arabia's close relations with Ethiopia give significance to the conversion of the treasurer to the queen of Ethiopia, not to mention the tradition that the Apostle Matthew was assigned to this land.

New Testament

NewThe New TestamentNew Testaments
The Ethiopian eunuch is a figure in the New Testament of the Bible.

Conversion to Christianity

conversionconvertedconverted to Christianity
The story of his conversion to Christianity is recounted in Acts 8.

Angel

angelsAll Angelsangelic
Philip the Evangelist was told by an angel to go to the road from Jerusalem to Gaza, and there he encountered the Ethiopian eunuch, the treasurer of the Candace, Queen of the Ethiopians (Ancient Greek: Κανδάκη, the "Candace" was the Meroitic language term for "queen" or possibly "royal woman").

Jerusalem

Jerusalem, IsraelAl-QudsQuds
Philip the Evangelist was told by an angel to go to the road from Jerusalem to Gaza, and there he encountered the Ethiopian eunuch, the treasurer of the Candace, Queen of the Ethiopians (Ancient Greek: Κανδάκη, the "Candace" was the Meroitic language term for "queen" or possibly "royal woman").

Gaza City

GazaGazanGaza District
Philip the Evangelist was told by an angel to go to the road from Jerusalem to Gaza, and there he encountered the Ethiopian eunuch, the treasurer of the Candace, Queen of the Ethiopians (Ancient Greek: Κανδάκη, the "Candace" was the Meroitic language term for "queen" or possibly "royal woman").

Chariot

chariotswar chariotwar chariots
Sitting in his chariot reading the Book of Isaiah, he was reading Isaiah 53:7-8.

Book of Isaiah

IsaiahDeutero-IsaiahIsa.
Sitting in his chariot reading the Book of Isaiah, he was reading Isaiah 53:7-8.

The gospel

Good NewsGospelGospel of Jesus Christ
Philip told him the Gospel of Jesus, and the Ethiopian asked to be baptized.

Jesus

Jesus ChristChristJesus of Nazareth
Philip told him the Gospel of Jesus, and the Ethiopian asked to be baptized.

Religious conversion

conversionconvertconverted
C. K. Barrett contrasts the Ethiopian eunuch's story with that of Cornelius the Centurion, another convert. Philip told him the Gospel of Jesus, and the Ethiopian asked to be baptized.

Baptism

baptizedbaptisedbaptize
They went down into some water and Philip baptized him.

King James Version

King James BibleKJVKing James Version of the Bible
In the King James Version and the Catholic Douay-Rheims Version, the Ethiopian says, "I believe that Jesus Christ is the Son of God" (verse 37), but this is omitted in most modern versions.

Douay–Rheims Bible

Douay-Rheims BibleDouay-RheimsDouay Bible
In the King James Version and the Catholic Douay-Rheims Version, the Ethiopian says, "I believe that Jesus Christ is the Son of God" (verse 37), but this is omitted in most modern versions.

List of New Testament verses not included in modern English translations

List of Bible verses not included in modern translationsList of omitted Bible versesActs 15:34
In the King James Version and the Catholic Douay-Rheims Version, the Ethiopian says, "I believe that Jesus Christ is the Son of God" (verse 37), but this is omitted in most modern versions.