Ethnic minorities in China

ethnic minoritiesethnic minorityChina's ethnic minoritiesChinese minoritiesChinese MinorityMinoritiesminorityethnic minorities of Chinaminority groupsminority peoples
Ethnic minorities in China are the non-Han Chinese population in China.wikipedia
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History of the Jews in China

ChinaJewsJews in China
In addition to these officially recognized ethnic minority groups, there are Chinese nationals who privately classify themselves as members of unrecognized ethnic groups (such as Jewish, Tuvan, Oirat, Ili Turki, and Japanese).
Over the centuries, the Kaifeng community came to be virtually indistinguishable from the Han Chinese population and is not recognized by the Chinese government as a separate ethnic minority.

Islam in China

MuslimChinese MuslimsChinese Muslim
During World War II, the American Asiatic Association published an entry in the text "Asia: journal of the American Asiatic Association, Volume 40", concerning the problem of whether Chinese Muslims were Chinese or a separate "ethnic minority", and the factors which lead to either classification.
Of China's 55 officially recognized minority peoples, ten groups are predominantly Sunni Muslim.

Zhuang people

ZhuangZhuangsthe Zhuang
The Zhuang is one such example; the ethnic group largely served as a catch-all collection of various hill villages in Guangxi province. The next largest ethnic groups in terms of population include the Zhuang (18 million), Manchu (15 million), Hui (10 million), Miao (9 million), Uyghur (8 million), Yi (7.8 million), Tujia (8 million), Mongols (5.8 million), Tibetans (5.4 million), Buyei (3 million), Yao (3.1 million), and Koreans (2.5 million).
They form one of the 56 ethnic groups officially recognized by the People's Republic of China.

Minzu University of China

Central University for NationalitiesCentral College for NationalitiesMinzu University
Similarly, the Central University for Nationalities changed its name to Minzu University of China.
Minzu University of China (MUC, ) is a national-level university in Haidian District, Beijing, China designated for ethnic minorities in China.

Miao people

MiaoMeoMèo
Various groups of the Miao minority, for example, speak different dialects of the Hmong–Mien languages, Tai–Kadai languages, and Chinese, and practice a variety of different cultural customs. The next largest ethnic groups in terms of population include the Zhuang (18 million), Manchu (15 million), Hui (10 million), Miao (9 million), Uyghur (8 million), Yi (7.8 million), Tujia (8 million), Mongols (5.8 million), Tibetans (5.4 million), Buyei (3 million), Yao (3.1 million), and Koreans (2.5 million).
The term "Miao" gained official status in 1949 as a minzu (ethnic group) encompassing a group of linguistically-related ethnic minorities in Southwest China.

Uyghurs

UyghurUighurUighurs
Groups that have been depicted this way include the Tibetans, Uyghurs and the Mongols. The next largest ethnic groups in terms of population include the Zhuang (18 million), Manchu (15 million), Hui (10 million), Miao (9 million), Uyghur (8 million), Yi (7.8 million), Tujia (8 million), Mongols (5.8 million), Tibetans (5.4 million), Buyei (3 million), Yao (3.1 million), and Koreans (2.5 million).
They are considered to be one of China's 55 officially recognized ethnic minorities.

Manchu people

ManchuManchusManchurian
Most Hui Chinese are indistinguishable from Han Chinese except for the fact that they practice Islam, and most Manchu are considered to be largely assimilated into dominant Han society. The next largest ethnic groups in terms of population include the Zhuang (18 million), Manchu (15 million), Hui (10 million), Miao (9 million), Uyghur (8 million), Yi (7.8 million), Tujia (8 million), Mongols (5.8 million), Tibetans (5.4 million), Buyei (3 million), Yao (3.1 million), and Koreans (2.5 million).
The Manchu are an ethnic minority in China and the people from whom Manchuria derives its name.

Hui people

HuiChinese MuslimHui Muslim
The next largest ethnic groups in terms of population include the Zhuang (18 million), Manchu (15 million), Hui (10 million), Miao (9 million), Uyghur (8 million), Yi (7.8 million), Tujia (8 million), Mongols (5.8 million), Tibetans (5.4 million), Buyei (3 million), Yao (3.1 million), and Koreans (2.5 million).
The Hui people are one of 56 ethnic groups recognized by China.

Yi people

YiLoloYi languages
The next largest ethnic groups in terms of population include the Zhuang (18 million), Manchu (15 million), Hui (10 million), Miao (9 million), Uyghur (8 million), Yi (7.8 million), Tujia (8 million), Mongols (5.8 million), Tibetans (5.4 million), Buyei (3 million), Yao (3.1 million), and Koreans (2.5 million).
Numbering nine million people, they are the seventh largest of the 55 ethnic minority groups officially recognized by the People's Republic of China.

Mongols in China

MongolMongolsethnic Mongol
The next largest ethnic groups in terms of population include the Zhuang (18 million), Manchu (15 million), Hui (10 million), Miao (9 million), Uyghur (8 million), Yi (7.8 million), Tujia (8 million), Mongols (5.8 million), Tibetans (5.4 million), Buyei (3 million), Yao (3.1 million), and Koreans (2.5 million).
They form one of the 55 ethnic minorities officially recognized by the People's Republic of China.

Yao people

YaoDaoMien
The next largest ethnic groups in terms of population include the Zhuang (18 million), Manchu (15 million), Hui (10 million), Miao (9 million), Uyghur (8 million), Yi (7.8 million), Tujia (8 million), Mongols (5.8 million), Tibetans (5.4 million), Buyei (3 million), Yao (3.1 million), and Koreans (2.5 million).
They are one of the 55 officially recognised ethnic minorities in China and reside in the mountainous terrain of the southwest and south.

One-child policy

One Child PolicyChina's one-child policyOne-Child
Minority populations are growing fast due to their being unaffected by the One Child Policy.
The policy also allowed exceptions for some other groups, including ethnic minorities.

Autonomous administrative divisions of China

ethnic townautonomous countiesautonomous county
Some ethnic minorities in China live in what are described as ethnic autonomous areas.
Autonomous administrative divisions of China are specific areas associated with one or more ethnic minorities that are designated as autonomous within the People's Republic of China (PRC).

China

People's Republic of ChinaChineseCHN
Ethnic minorities in China are the non-Han Chinese population in China.
In addition to Han people's local religious practices, there are also various ethnic minority groups in China who maintain their traditional autochthone religions.

Salar people

SalarSalarsSalar Muslims
The Salar people are a Turkic ethnic minority of China who largely speak the Salar language, an Oghuz language.

Zhonghua minzu

Chinese nationChineseChinese people
By definition, these ethnic minority groups, together with the Han majority, make up the greater Chinese nationality known as zhonghua minzu.

Xinjiang

Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous RegionXinjiang Uygur Autonomous RegionSinkiang
Only Tibet Autonomous Region and Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region have a majority population of official minorities, while all other provinces, municipalities and regions of China have a Han majority.
Military personnel are not counted and national minorities are undercounted in the Chinese census, as in most censuses.

Affirmative action in China

affirmative actionallowed exceptionsthere are some benefits available
The policies giving preferential treatment to ethnic minorities in China.

List of ethnic groups in China

Major NationalitiesNationalities56 ethnic groups
The major minority ethnic groups in China are Zhuang (16.9 million), Hui (10.5 million), Manchu (10.3 million), Uyghur (10 million), Miao (9.4 million), Yi (8.7 million), Tujia (8.3 million), Tibetan (6.2 million), Mongol (5.9 million), Dong (2.8 million), Buyei (2.8 million), Yao (2.7 million), Bai (1.9 million), Korean (1.8 million), Hani (1.6 million), Li (1.4 million), Kazakh (1.4 million) and Dai (1.2 million).

Human rights in China

Human rights in the People's Republic of Chinahuman rightsChina's human rights record
Numerous human rights groups have publicized human rights issues in China that they consider the government to be mishandling, including: the death penalty (capital punishment), the one-child policy (in which China had made exceptions for ethnic minorities prior to abolishing it in 2015), the political and legal status of Tibet, and neglect of freedom of the press in mainland China.

China National Ethnic Song and Dance Ensemble

China National Ethnic Song and Dance Ensemble (,variously translated as China Central Song and Dance Ensemble of Ethnic Groups or Central Nationalities Song and Dance Ensemble), based in Beijing, is the only national-level performance group representing China's ethnic minorities.

Unrecognized ethnic groups in China

UndistinguishedUndistinguished ethnic groups in Chinaunrecognized ethnic groups
In addition to these officially recognized ethnic minority groups, there are Chinese nationals who privately classify themselves as members of unrecognized ethnic groups (such as Jewish, Tuvan, Oirat, Ili Turki, and Japanese).