Etymology of hippie

hippieword 'hippie
This article discusses the etymology of the word hippie.wikipedia
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Hippie

hippieshippyhippie movement
This article discusses the etymology of the word hippie.
The word hippie came from hipster and was used to describe beatniks who moved into New York City's Greenwich Village and San Francisco's Haight-Ashbury district.

Etymology

etymologicaletymologicallyetymologies
This article discusses the etymology of the word hippie.

Jesse Sheidlower

According to lexicographer Jesse Sheidlower, the terms hipster and hippie derive from the word hip and the synonym hep, whose origins are unknown.

Hip (slang)

hiphipnesshippest
According to lexicographer Jesse Sheidlower, the terms hipster and hippie derive from the word hip and the synonym hep, whose origins are unknown.

Slang

slang termSlang termsinformal
The words hip and hep first surfaced in slang around the beginning of the 20th century and spread quickly, making their first appearance in the Oxford English Dictionary in 1904.

Oxford English Dictionary

OEDOxford DictionaryThe Oxford English Dictionary
The words hip and hep first surfaced in slang around the beginning of the 20th century and spread quickly, making their first appearance in the Oxford English Dictionary in 1904.

John Dalby (painter)

John DalbyDalby, DavidDavid Dalby
In the late 1960s, African language scholar David Dalby popularized the idea that words used in American slang could be traced back to West Africa.

West Africa

West AfricanWestWestern Africa
In the late 1960s, African language scholar David Dalby popularized the idea that words used in American slang could be traced back to West Africa.

Wolof language

WolofwolClassical Wolof
He claimed that hipi (a word in the Wolof language meaning "to open one's eyes") was the source for both hip and hep.

Jive (dance)

Jivejive dance Jive
During the jive era of the late 1930s and early 1940s, African-Americans began to use the term hip to mean "sophisticated, fashionable and fully up-to-date",.

Harry Gibson

Harry "The Hipster" GibsonHarry the Hipster
Harry Gibson added the term "the Hipster" to his Harlem stage act in 1944, and in his later autobiography, says he coined it for that purpose.

Harlem

Harlem, New YorkHarlem, New York CityHarlem, NY
Harry Gibson added the term "the Hipster" to his Harlem stage act in 1944, and in his later autobiography, says he coined it for that purpose.

Malcolm X

assassination of Malcolm XEl-Hajj Malik El-ShabazzMalcolm Little
Reminiscing about late 1940s Harlem in his 1964 autobiography, Malcolm X referred to the word hippy as a term that African Americans used to describe a specific type of white man who "acted more Negro than Negroes".

African Americans

African AmericanAfrican-Americanblack
Reminiscing about late 1940s Harlem in his 1964 autobiography, Malcolm X referred to the word hippy as a term that African Americans used to describe a specific type of white man who "acted more Negro than Negroes".

White people

whitewhitesCaucasian
Reminiscing about late 1940s Harlem in his 1964 autobiography, Malcolm X referred to the word hippy as a term that African Americans used to describe a specific type of white man who "acted more Negro than Negroes".

Negro

NegroesblackNEGRO RACE
Reminiscing about late 1940s Harlem in his 1964 autobiography, Malcolm X referred to the word hippy as a term that African Americans used to describe a specific type of white man who "acted more Negro than Negroes".

Greenwich Village

Greenwich Village, New YorkGreenwich Village Historic DistrictGreenwich Village, Manhattan
In Greenwich Village, New York City by the end of the 1950s, young counterculture advocates were widely called hips because they were considered "in the know" or "cool", as opposed to being square.

New York City

New YorkNew York, New YorkNew York City, New York
In Greenwich Village, New York City by the end of the 1950s, young counterculture advocates were widely called hips because they were considered "in the know" or "cool", as opposed to being square.

Counterculture of the 1960s

counterculture1960s counterculturecountercultural
In Greenwich Village, New York City by the end of the 1950s, young counterculture advocates were widely called hips because they were considered "in the know" or "cool", as opposed to being square.

Square (slang)

squaresquaressquare "Spießer
In Greenwich Village, New York City by the end of the 1950s, young counterculture advocates were widely called hips because they were considered "in the know" or "cool", as opposed to being square.

Hippy Hippy Shake

The Hippy Hippy Shake
The first song to mention the word "Hippy" is the 1959 rock 'n roll single, "Hippy Hippy Shake", by Chan Romero, which reached #3 in Australia; it was also covered by the Beatles in 1963.

Chan Romero

The first song to mention the word "Hippy" is the 1959 rock 'n roll single, "Hippy Hippy Shake", by Chan Romero, which reached #3 in Australia; it was also covered by the Beatles in 1963.

Australia

AUSAustralianCommonwealth of Australia
The first song to mention the word "Hippy" is the 1959 rock 'n roll single, "Hippy Hippy Shake", by Chan Romero, which reached #3 in Australia; it was also covered by the Beatles in 1963.

The Beatles

BeatlesBeatleBeatlesque
The first song to mention the word "Hippy" is the 1959 rock 'n roll single, "Hippy Hippy Shake", by Chan Romero, which reached #3 in Australia; it was also covered by the Beatles in 1963.

How to Speak Hip

One of the earliest attestations of the term hippy is found in the "Dictionary of Hip Words and Phrases" included in the liner notes for the 1959 comedy album How to Speak Hip, a parody based on the burgeoning Greenwich Village scene.