Eunice Newton Foote

Eunice NewtonEunice (née Newton) FooteEunice Foote
Eunice Newton Foote (July 17, 1819 – September 30, 1888) was an American scientist, physicist, inventor, and women's rights campaigner from Seneca Falls, New York.wikipedia
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Greenhouse effect

greenhouse warminggreenhousegreenhouse gases
Although her experiments did not clearly differentiate between the effect of incident solar radiation and that of long-wave infrared, in the process, she identified the root cause of what we now call the greenhouse effect.
The argument and the evidence were further strengthened by Claude Pouillet in 1827 and 1838 and reasoned from experimental observations by Eunice Newton Foote in 1856.

Emma Willard School

Troy Female SeminaryEmma Willard School for GirlsTroy Seminary
Eunice attended the Troy Female Seminary, later re-named the Emma Willard School, from 1836-1838.

Declaration of Sentiments

Declaration of Rights and Sentiments1848 Seneca Falls Declarationdeclaration of independence for women
As a member of the editorial committee for the 1848 Seneca Falls Convention, the first women's rights convention, Foote was one of the signatories of the convention's Declaration of Sentiments.

Goshen, Connecticut

GoshenGoshen, ConnGoshen, CT
She was born as Eunice Newton in 1819 in Goshen, Connecticut, but grew up In Bloomfield, New York and was educated at the Troy Female Seminary in 1836-37 where she was taught scientific theory by Amos Eaton. Her mother was Thirza Newton, and her father was Isaac Newton Jr., originally of Goshen, Connecticut and later a farmer and entreprenuer in East Bloomfield, New York She had six sisters and five brothers.

Elisha Foote

On August 12, 1841, she married Elisha Foote, a judge, statistician, and inventor in East Bloomfield.
He was married to was the scientist and women's rights campaigner Eunice Newton.

Seneca Falls Convention

Women's Rights ConventionFirst Women's Rights Convention1848 Women's Rights Convention
As a member of the editorial committee for the 1848 Seneca Falls Convention, the first women's rights convention, Foote was one of the signatories of the convention's Declaration of Sentiments.
To close the meeting, a committee was appointed to edit and publish the convention proceedings, with Amy Post, Eunice Newton Foote, Mary Ann M'Clintock, Jr., Elizabeth W. M'Clintock and Stanton serving.

Mary Foote Henderson

Mary Foote
She was born in Seneca Falls, New York, the daughter of Eunice Newton, a scientist and women's rights campaigner, and Elisha Foote, a prominent lawyer and judge, and the niece of Senator Samuel Foote of Connecticut and numerous other aunts and uncles.

Augusta Foote Arnold

Augusta Newton Foote
Her father was Elisha Foote, a judge, inventor, and mathematician, and her mother was Eunice (née Newton) Foote, a scientist and women's rights campaigner.

History of climate change science

climate change scienceclimate scienceglobal warming
The warming effects of visible light on different gases was examined in 1856 by Eunice Newton Foote, who described her experiments using glass tubes exposed to sunlight.

John Henderson Jr.

Angelica Schuyler CrosbyJohn Brooks Henderson Jr.John B. Henderson Jr.
His maternal grandparents were Eunice (née Newton) Foote, a scientist and women's rights campaigner, and Elisha Foote, a prominent lawyer and judge.

Women's rights

women’s rightswomenwomen's rights movement
Eunice Newton Foote (July 17, 1819 – September 30, 1888) was an American scientist, physicist, inventor, and women's rights campaigner from Seneca Falls, New York.

Seneca Falls, New York

Seneca FallsSeneca Falls, NYTown of Seneca Falls
Eunice Newton Foote (July 17, 1819 – September 30, 1888) was an American scientist, physicist, inventor, and women's rights campaigner from Seneca Falls, New York.

American Association for the Advancement of Science

AAASAmerican Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)American Association for the Advancement of Sciences
She was the first scientist to theorize that changing the proportion of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere would change its temperature, in her paper Circumstances affecting the heat of the sun's rays at the American Association for the Advancement of Science conference in 1856.

Joseph Henry

Henry, JosephHenryJoseph Henry Papers Project
Perhaps because women were not yet allowed to present papers to AAAS at that time, Professor Joseph Henry of the Smithsonian Institution delivered the paper that identified the research as her work.

Smithsonian Institution

SmithsonianUnited States National MuseumSmithsonian Museum
Perhaps because women were not yet allowed to present papers to AAAS at that time, Professor Joseph Henry of the Smithsonian Institution delivered the paper that identified the research as her work.

East Bloomfield, New York

East BloomfieldTown of East BloomfieldSouth Bloomfield, New York
Her mother was Thirza Newton, and her father was Isaac Newton Jr., originally of Goshen, Connecticut and later a farmer and entreprenuer in East Bloomfield, New York She had six sisters and five brothers.

Almira Hart Lincoln Phelps

There she was influenced by the textbooks of Almira Hart Lincoln Phelps, Emma Willard's sister, who was a female pioneer of women in science, a botany expert, and the third female member of the AAAS.

Elizabeth Cady Stanton

Elizabeth StantonElizabeth C. StantonStanton
Foote was a neighbor and friend of suffragist Elizabeth Cady Stanton.

Sunlight

sunshinesolar radiationnatural light
Allowing both cylinders to reach the same temperature, she placed the cylinders in the sunlight to measure temperature variance once heated and under different moisture conditions.

John Tyndall

TyndallJohn Tyndall FellowshipJ Tyndall
Apparently unaware of the 1856 publication in AAAS of Foote's experiments on the gases trapping sunlight, three years later, John Tyndall reported his results investigating how various gases trapped infrared thermal radiation, which was published by the Proceedings of the Royal Society, where he was a fellow.

Infrared

IRnear-infraredinfra-red
Apparently unaware of the 1856 publication in AAAS of Foote's experiments on the gases trapping sunlight, three years later, John Tyndall reported his results investigating how various gases trapped infrared thermal radiation, which was published by the Proceedings of the Royal Society, where he was a fellow.

Thermal radiation

radiant heatradiationthermal emission
Apparently unaware of the 1856 publication in AAAS of Foote's experiments on the gases trapping sunlight, three years later, John Tyndall reported his results investigating how various gases trapped infrared thermal radiation, which was published by the Proceedings of the Royal Society, where he was a fellow.

Proceedings of the Royal Society

Proceedings of the Royal Society BProceedings of the Royal Society of LondonProceedings of the Royal Society A
Apparently unaware of the 1856 publication in AAAS of Foote's experiments on the gases trapping sunlight, three years later, John Tyndall reported his results investigating how various gases trapped infrared thermal radiation, which was published by the Proceedings of the Royal Society, where he was a fellow.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists

AAPGAAPG ExplorerCosuna
In January 2011, Sorenson published his findings on Foote in AAPG Search and Discovery, where it received "more response than any of his other work".

University of California, Santa Barbara

UC Santa BarbaraUniversity of California at Santa BarbaraUCSB
In November 2019 at University of California, Santa Barbara a lecture and library exhibit recognized Foote's contribution to climate science and her omission from the history of the field.