A report on Euphradian Society

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Literary society founded in 1806 at the University of South Carolina, then known as South Carolina College.

- Euphradian Society
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Henry William Ravenel

Clariosophic Society

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Literary society founded in 1806 at the University of South Carolina, then known as South Carolina College, as a result of the splitting in two of the Philomathic Society, which had been formed within weeks of the opening of the college in 1805 and included virtually all students.

Literary society founded in 1806 at the University of South Carolina, then known as South Carolina College, as a result of the splitting in two of the Philomathic Society, which had been formed within weeks of the opening of the college in 1805 and included virtually all students.

Henry William Ravenel
Hugh S. Legaré
Wade Hampton III
John Murphy, fourth governor of Alabama

At what was called the Synapian Convention held in February, 1806, the members of Philomathic voted to split into two separate societies, one of which became known as Clariosophic, while the other society became known as Euphradian.

Demosthenian Hall at the University of Georgia, built in 1824

College literary societies

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College literary societies in American higher education were a distinctive kind of social organization, distinct from literary societies generally, and they were often the precursors of college fraternities and sororities.

College literary societies in American higher education were a distinctive kind of social organization, distinct from literary societies generally, and they were often the precursors of college fraternities and sororities.

Demosthenian Hall at the University of Georgia, built in 1824
Members of the Miami University Erodelphian Literary Society, 1906.
Members of the Miami University Adelphic Association, 1913.
Members of the Arlington Training School's Jolly Junior Literary Society, circa 1913-1916
The University of Pennsylvania Philomathean Society Meeting Room circa 1913
The Philodemic Society Room in 1910
Philomathean Hall of Erskine College
Clio Hall of Princeton University
Demosthenian Hall at the University of Georgia
The Dialectic Society Chamber in New West at the University of North Carolina
Jefferson Hall at the University of Virginia

Some examples include the Philodemic and Philonomosian Societies at Georgetown University, the American Whig and Cliosophic Societies at Princeton University, Social Friends and United Fraternity at Dartmouth College, the Philorhetorian and Peithologian societies at Wesleyan University, the Philologian and Philotechnian societies at Williams College, the Philomathean and Zelosophic societies at the University of Pennsylvania, the Philolexian and Peithologian societies at Columbia University, the Clariosophic, Euphradian, and the Euphrosynean societies at the University of South Carolina, the Phi Kappa and Demosthenian societies at the University of Georgia, the Linonia and Brothers in Unity at Yale University, the Miami Union and Erodelphian (previously Adelphic) societies at Miami University and Dialectic and Philanthropic Societies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

University of South Carolina

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Public research university in Columbia, South Carolina.

Public research university in Columbia, South Carolina.

The university's first president, Reverend Jonathan Maxcy
South Carolina College as it appeared in 1850 looking from College Street
An 1872 aerial illustration of the University of South Carolina Horseshoe
Built in 1909, Davis College was the university's first new building after the Civil War and currently houses the School of Library and Information Science
The University of South Carolina's historic Horseshoe, on which the university's first building was built in 1805
Lieber College, originally constructed in 1837, is the office of undergraduate admissions at the University of South Carolina and is listed in the National Register of Historic Places
Completed in May 2000, the $32 million Graduate Science Research Center is home to the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of South Carolina
West Quad, also called the "Green Quad", became the University of South Carolina's first LEED certified residence hall when it opened in 2004.
The university's Greek Village is the home of 20 sorority and fraternity houses
The university's mascot, Cocky entertaining Gamecock fans at Gamecock Village prior to game vs. LousLaf in 2007.
Williams-Brice Stadium (est. 1930, renovated 1996)
Andrew Card, BS 1971, U.S. Secretary of Transportation under George H. W. Bush, White House Chief of Staff under George W. Bush
Rita Cosby, BA 1989, three time Emmy Award winner, special correspondent for Inside Edition
Lindsey Graham, BA 1977, JD 1981, U.S. Senator from South Carolina
Richard Riley, JD 1959, former Governor of South Carolina, 6th United States Secretary of Education
Stephen K. Benjamin, BA 1991 and JD 1994, 36th mayor of Columbia, South Carolina
Joe Wilson, JD 1972, the U.S. representative for {{ushr|SC|2}}
Larry Kellner, BS 1981, former CEO of Continental Airlines, member of the Boeing board of directors
Wade Hampton III, 1836, Governor of South Carolina, United States Senator, and Confederate General
John B. Floyd, 1829, Governor of Virginia, United States Secretary of War
Flowers in front of Thomas Cooper Library
The fountain and pond in front of Thomas Cooper Library
Lee Atwater, MA 1977, Chair of the Republican National Committee
Ainsley Earhardt, BA 1999, co-host of Fox & Friends on Fox News
Alex English, BA 1976, 8-time NBA all star
Leeza Gibbons, BA 1979, TV host, seven time Emmy Award nominee, reporter for Entertainment Tonight
Henry McMaster, BA 1969, JD 1973, current Governor of South Carolina
Tom Rice, BA, MS 1979, JD 1982, current U.S. representative for {{ushr|SC|7}}
Darius Rucker, musician and lead vocalist, Hootie & the Blowfish
William Timmons, MA, JD, current U.S. representative for {{ushr|SC|4}}

As with other southern universities in the antebellum period, the most important organizations for students were the two literary societies, the Clariosophic Society and the Euphradian Society.