Statue representing Europa at Palazzo Ferreria, in Valletta, Malta
First map of the world according to Anaximander (6th century BC)
The boundary of the 13th century Mongol Empire and location of today's Mongols in modern Mongolia, Russia and China.
A medieval T and O map printed by Günther Zainer in 1472, showing the three continents as domains of the sons of Noah — Asia to Sem (Shem), Europe to Iafeth (Japheth) and Africa to Cham (Ham)
Single markets in European and post-Soviet countries; European Economic Area and Common Economic Space
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ASEM Partners
A New Map of Europe According to the Newest Observations (1721) by Hermann Moll draws the eastern boundary of Europe along the Don River flowing south-west and the Tobol, Irtysh and Ob rivers flowing north
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1916 political map of Europe showing most of Moll's waterways replaced by von Strahlenberg's Ural Mountains and Freshfield's Caucasus Crest, land features of a type that normally defines a subcontinent
Area from Lisbon to Vladivostok with all European and CIS countries
Paleolithic cave paintings from Lascaux in France ( 15,000 BCE)
Physical map of Asia
Stonehenge in the United Kingdom (Late Neolithic from 3000 to 2000 BCE).
Changes in national boundaries after the collapse of the Eastern Bloc
The Parthenon in Athens (432 BCE)
Animation showing the growth and division of the Roman Empire (years CE)
Viking raids and division of the Frankish Empire at the Treaty of Verdun in 843
The maritime republics of medieval Italy reestablished contacts between Europe, Asia and Africa with extensive trade networks and colonies across the Mediterranean, and had an essential role in the Crusades.
Tancred of Sicily and Philip II of France, during the Third Crusade (1189–1192)
The sacking of Suzdal by Batu Khan in 1238, during the Mongol invasion of Europe.
The School of Athens by Raphael (1511): Contemporaries, such as Michelangelo and Leonardo da Vinci (centre), are portrayed as classical scholars of the Renaissance.
Habsburg dominions in the centuries following their partition by Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor. The principal military base of Philip II in Europe was the Spanish road stretching from the Netherlands to the Duchy of Milan.
The national boundaries within Europe set by the Congress of Vienna
Marshall's Temple Works (1840), the Industrial Revolution started in Great Britain
Map of European colonial empires throughout the world in 1914.
Map depicting the military alliances of World War I in 1914–1918
Serbian war efforts (1914–1918) cost the country one quarter of its population.
Nazi Germany began a devastating World War II in Europe by its leader, Adolf Hitler. Here Hitler, on the right, with his closest ally, the Italian dictator Benito Mussolini, in 1940
Bombed and burned-out buildings in Hamburg, 1944/45
The "Big Three" at the Yalta Conference in 1945; seated (from the left): Winston Churchill, Franklin D. Roosevelt and Joseph Stalin
The Schuman Declaration led to the creation of the European Coal and Steel Community. It began the integration process of the European Union (9 May 1950, at the French Foreign Ministry).
Flag of Europe, adopted by the Council of Europe in 1955 as the flag for the whole of Europe
Map of populous Europe and surrounding regions showing physical, political and population characteristics, as per 2018
Köppen-Geiger climate classification map for Europe.
The Volga, as seen in Yaroslavl. It flows from Central Russia and into the Caspian Sea and is the longest river in Europe.
Mount Elbrus in Southern Russia, is the highest mountain in Europe.
Europa Point as seen from the Strait of Gibraltar, which separates the continents of Europe and Africa, also being between the Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea.
The Danube, as seen in Đerdap National Park. It flows from the Black Forest and into the Black Sea and is the second-longest river in Europe, which also passes through the largest number of countries in the world at 10.
Sutjeska National Park contains Perućica, which is one of the last remaining primeval forests in Europe.
Land use map of Europe with arable farmland (yellow), forest (dark green), pasture (light green) and tundra, or bogs, in the north (dark yellow)
Floristic regions of Europe and neighbouring areas, according to Wolfgang Frey and Rainer Lösch
Biogeographic regions of Europe and bordering regions
A brown bear near the Russian border in the forests of Kainuu, Finland
Once roaming the great temperate forests of Eurasia, European bison now live in nature preserves in Białowieża Forest, on the border between Poland and Belarus.
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Fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989.
Eurozone (blue colour)
One of Kosovo's main economical sources is mining, because it has large reserves of lead, zinc, silver, nickel, cobalt, copper, iron and bauxite. Miners at the Trepča Mines in Mitrovica, Kosovo in 2011.
Population growth in and around Europe in 2021
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Map purportedly displaying the European continent split along cultural and state borders as proposed by the German organization Ständiger Ausschuss für geographische Namen (StAGN).
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Tallinn, the medieval capital of Estonia in the Baltic States, is a mixture of Western and Eastern architectural cultures.
Surficial geology of Europe

Europe is a continent, also recognised as a part of Eurasia, located entirely in the Northern Hemisphere and mostly in the Eastern Hemisphere.

- Europe

Eurasia is the largest continental area on Earth, comprising all of Europe and Asia.

- Eurasia
Statue representing Europa at Palazzo Ferreria, in Valletta, Malta

8 related topics

Alpha

Asia

Earth's largest and most populous continent, located primarily in the Eastern and Northern Hemispheres.

Earth's largest and most populous continent, located primarily in the Eastern and Northern Hemispheres.

Map of the most populous part of Asia showing physical, political and population characteristics, as per 2018
Definitions used for the boundary between Europe and Asia in different periods of History. The commonly accepted modern definition mostly fits with the lines "B" and "F" in this image.
Afro-Eurasia shown in green
Ptolemy's Asia
The province of Asia highlighted (in red) within the Roman Empire.
The Silk Road connected civilizations across Asia
The Mongol Empire at its greatest extent. The gray area is the later Timurid Empire.
The Himalayan range is home to some of the planet's highest peaks.
Division of Asia into regions by the UNSD
Graph showing temperature change in Asia from 1901 to 2021. Climate change is having major impacts on many countries in the continent.
Singapore has one of the busiest container ports in the world and is the world's fourth largest foreign exchange trading center.
Mumbai is one of the most populous cities on the continent. The city is an infrastructure and tourism hub, and plays a crucial role in the economy of India.
Wat Phra Kaew in the Grand Palace is among Bangkok's major tourist attractions.
Graph showing population by continent as a percentage of world population (1750–2005)
The Western Wall and the Dome of the Rock, Jerusalem
The Church of the Nativity in Bethlehem
Pilgrims in the annual Hajj at the Kaabah in Mecca.
The Swaminarayan Akshardham Temple in Delhi, according to the Guinness World Records is the World's Largest Comprehensive Hindu Temple
The Hindu-Buddhist temple of Angkor Wat in Cambodia, the largest religious monument in the world
A refugee special train in Ambala, Punjab during the partition of India in 1947
US forces drop Napalm on suspected Viet Cong positions in 1965
Wounded civilians arrive at a hospital in Aleppo during the Syrian Civil War, October 2012
Demonstrations in Hong Kong against the Extradition bill began in March 2019 and turned into continuing mass movements, drawing around 2 million protesters by June
Indian polymath Rabindranath Tagore was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1913, and became Asia's first Nobel laureate.
From 1841 to 1997, Hong Kong was a British colony.
The threefold division of the Old World into Europe, Asia and Africa has been in use since the 6th century BC, due to Greek geographers such as Anaximander and Hecataeus.
1825 map of Asia by Sidney Edwards Morse.
Map of western, southern, and central Asia in 1885<ref>{{cite web |url=http://www.wdl.org/en/item/11753/#institution=library-of-congress&page=17 |title=A Map of the Countries between Constantinople and Calcutta: Including Turkey in Asia, Persia, Afghanistan and Turkestan |website=Wdl.org |access-date=9 November 2017 |url-status=live |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20171017220525/https://www.wdl.org/en/item/11753/#institution=library-of-congress&page=17 |archive-date=17 October 2017 |year=1885 }}</ref>
The map of Asia in 1796, which also included the continent of Australia (then known as New Holland).
1890 map of Asia
Kerala backwaters
Mongolian steppe
South China Karst
Altai Mountains
Hunza Valley
Atolls of the Maldives
Wadi Rum in Jordan
Japanese wedding at the Meiji Shrine
Hindu festival celebrated by Singapore's Tamil community
Bar mitzvah at the Western Wall in Jerusalem
Catholic procession of the Black Nazarene in Manila
Druze dignitaries celebrating the Ziyarat al-Nabi Shu'ayb festival at the tomb of the prophet in Hittin
Christian Armenians praying at the Etchmiadzin Cathedral in Vagharshapat
Muslim men praying at the Ortaköy Mosque in Istanbul
Buddhist Monks performing traditional Sand mandala made from coloured sand

It shares the continental landmass of Eurasia with the continent of Europe, and the continental landmass of Afro-Eurasia with Africa and Europe.

Russia

Transcontinental country spanning Eastern Europe and Northern Asia.

Transcontinental country spanning Eastern Europe and Northern Asia.

The Kurgan hypothesis places the Volga-Dnieper region of southern Russia and Ukraine as the urheimat of the Proto-Indo-Europeans.
Kievan Rus' in the 11th century
Sergius of Radonezh blessing Dmitry Donskoy in Trinity Sergius Lavra, before the Battle of Kulikovo, depicted in a painting by Ernst Lissner
Tsar Ivan the Terrible, in an evocation by Viktor Vasnetsov, 1897.
Russian expansion and territorial evolution between the 14th and 20th centuries.
Napoleon's retreat from Moscow by Albrecht Adam (1851).
Emperor Nicholas II of Russia and the Romanovs were executed by the Bolsheviks in 1918.
Vladimir Lenin and Leon Trotsky during a 1920 speech in Moscow
Location of the Russian SFSR (red) within the Soviet Union in 1936
The Battle of Stalingrad, the largest and bloodiest battle in the history of warfare, ended in 1943 with a decisive Soviet victory against the German Army.
The "Big Three" at the Yalta Conference in February 1945, Winston Churchill, Franklin D. Roosevelt and Joseph Stalin.
Mikhail Gorbachev in one-to-one discussions with Ronald Reagan in the Reykjavík Summit, 1986.
Vladimir Putin takes the oath of office as president on his first inauguration, with Boris Yeltsin looking over, 2000.
Vladimir Putin (third, left), Sergey Aksyonov (first, left), Vladimir Konstantinov (second, left) and Aleksei Chalyi (right) sign the Treaty on Accession of the Republic of Crimea to Russia in 2014
Topographic map of Russia
Köppen climate classification of Russia.
Yugyd Va National Park in the Komi Republic is the largest national park in Europe.
Chart for the political system of Russia
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Putin with G20 counterparts in Osaka, 2019.
Sukhoi Su-57, a fifth-generation fighter of the Russian Air Force.
Following the Russian invasion of Ukraine in 2022, anti-war protests broke out across Russia. The protests have been met with widespread repression, leading to roughly 15,000 being arrested.
The Moscow International Business Center in Moscow. The city has one of the world's largest urban economies.
The Trans-Siberian Railway is the longest railway line in the world, connecting Moscow to Vladivostok.
Mikhail Lomonosov (1711–1765), polymath scientist, inventor, poet and artist
Mir, Soviet and Russian space station that operated in low Earth orbit from 1986 to 2001.
Peterhof Palace in Saint Petersburg, a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
Saint Basil's Cathedral in Moscow is the most iconic religious architecture of Russia.
Moscow State University, the most prestigious educational institution in Russia.
Metallurg, a Soviet-era sanatorium in Sochi.
The Bolshoi Theatre in Moscow, at night.
The Scarlet Sails being celebrated along the Neva in Saint Petersburg
Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (1840–1893), in a 1893 painting by Nikolai Dmitriyevich Kuznetsov
Kvass is an ancient and traditional Russian beverage.
Ostankino Tower in Moscow, the tallest freestanding structure in Europe.
Maria Sharapova, former world No. 1 tennis player, was the world's highest-paid female athlete for 11 consecutive years.

It is the ninth-most populous country and the most populous country in Europe, with a population of 145.5 million.

It spans the northernmost edge of Eurasia; and has the world's fourth-longest coastline, of over 37653 km. Russia lies between latitudes 41° and 82° N, and longitudes 19° E and 169° W, extending some 9000 km east to west, and 2500 to 4000 km north to south.

Map of the Mediterranean Sea

Mediterranean Sea

Sea connected to the Atlantic Ocean, surrounded by the Mediterranean Basin and almost completely enclosed by land: on the north by Western and Southern Europe and Anatolia, on the south by North Africa, and on the east by the Levant.

Sea connected to the Atlantic Ocean, surrounded by the Mediterranean Basin and almost completely enclosed by land: on the north by Western and Southern Europe and Anatolia, on the south by North Africa, and on the east by the Levant.

Map of the Mediterranean Sea
Greek (red) and Phoenician (yellow) colonies in antiquity c. the 6th century BC
The Roman Empire at its farthest extent in AD 117
The Battle of Lepanto, 1571, ended in victory for the European Holy League against the Ottoman Turks.
The bombardment of Algiers by the Anglo-Dutch fleet in support of an ultimatum to release European slaves, August 1816
Borders of the Mediterranean Sea
Approximate extent of the Mediterranean drainage basin (dark green). Nile basin only partially shown
Map of the Mediterranean Sea from open Natural Earth data, 2020
Alexandria, the largest city on the Mediterranean
Barcelona, the second largest metropolitan area on the Mediterranean Sea (after Alexandria) and the headquarters of the Union for the Mediterranean
The Acropolis of Athens with the Mediterranean Sea in the background
The ancient port of Jaffa (now in Tel Aviv-Yafo), from which the biblical Jonah set sail before being swallowed by a whale
Catania, Sicily, Italy, with Mount Etna in the background
İzmir, the third metropolis of Turkey (after Istanbul and Ankara)
Africa (left, on horizon) and Europe (right), as seen from Gibraltar
Positano, Italy, Tyrrhenian Sea
View of the Saint George Bay, and snow-capped Mount Sannine from a tower in the Beirut Central District
The Port of Marseille seen from L'Estaque
Sarandë, Albania, stands on an open-sea gulf of the Ionian sea in the central Mediterranean.
The two biggest islands of the Mediterranean: Sicily and Sardinia (Italy)
Predominant surface currents for June
A submarine karst spring, called vrulja, near Omiš; observed through several ripplings of an otherwise calm sea surface.
Messinian salinity crisis before the Zanclean flood
The thermonuclear bomb that fell into the sea recovered off Palomares, Almería, 1966
Stromboli volcano in Italy
The reticulate whipray is one of the species that colonised the Eastern Mediterranean through the Suez Canal as part of the ongoing Lessepsian migration.
A cargo ship cruises towards the Strait of Messina
Port of Trieste
Kemer Beach in Antalya on the Turkish Riviera (Turquoise Coast). In 2019, Turkey ranked sixth in the world in terms of the number of international tourist arrivals, with 51.2 million foreign tourists visiting the country.
Coast of Alexandria, view From Bibliotheca Alexandrina, Egypt
Beach of Hammamet, Tunisia
The beach of la Courtade in the Îles d'Hyères, France
Sardinia's south coast, Italy
Pretty Bay, Malta
Panoramic view of Piran, Slovenia
Panoramic view of Cavtat, Croatia
View of Neum, Bosnia and Herzegovina
A view of Sveti Stefan, Montenegro
Ksamil Islands, Albania
Navagio, Greece
Ölüdeniz, Turquoise Coast, Turkey
Paphos, Cyprus
Burj Islam Beach, Latakia, Syria
A view of Raouché off the coast of Beirut, Lebanon
A view of Haifa, Israel
Old city of Ibiza Town, Spain
Les Aiguades near Béjaïa, Algeria
El Jebha, a port town in Morocco
Europa Point, Gibraltar
Panoramic view of La Condamine, Monaco
Sunset at the Deir al-Balah beach, Gaza Strip

The Mediterranean Sea covers an area of about 2500000 km2, representing 0.7% of the global ocean surface, but its connection to the Atlantic via the Strait of Gibraltar—the narrow strait that connects the Atlantic Ocean to the Mediterranean Sea and separates the Iberian Peninsula in Europe from Morocco in Africa—is only 14 km wide.

The Mediterranean basin and sea system were established by the ancient African-Arabian continent colliding with the Eurasian continent.

Turkey

Transcontinental country located mainly on the Anatolian Peninsula in Western Asia, with a small portion on the Balkan Peninsula in Southeast Europe.

Transcontinental country located mainly on the Anatolian Peninsula in Western Asia, with a small portion on the Balkan Peninsula in Southeast Europe.

Some henges at Göbekli Tepe were erected as far back as 9600 BC, predating those of Stonehenge, England, by over seven millennia.
The Great Seljuk Empire in 1092, upon the death of Malik Shah I
The Second Ottoman Siege of Vienna in 1683 (the First Siege was in 1529) initiated the Great Turkish War (1683–1699) between the Ottomans and a Holy League of European states.
Armenian civilians being deported during the Armenian genocide
Mustafa Kemal Atatürk, founder and first President of the Turkish Republic, with the Liberal Republican Party leader Fethi Okyar (right) and Okyar's daughter in Yalova, 13 August 1930.
Eighteen female deputies joined the Turkish Parliament with the 1935 general elections. Turkish women gained the right to vote and to hold elected office as a mark of the far-reaching social changes initiated by Atatürk.
Roosevelt, İnönü and Churchill at the Second Cairo Conference, 1943.
Anıtkabir, the mausoleum of Mustafa Kemal Atatürk in Ankara, is visited by large crowds every year during national holidays, such as Republic Day on 29 October.
Istanbul Çağlayan Justice Palace is a courthouse in the Şişli district of Istanbul.
After becoming one of the early members of the Council of Europe in 1950, Turkey became an associate member of the EEC in 1963, joined the EU Customs Union in 1995 and started full membership negotiations with the European Union in 2005.
The Turkish Armed Forces collectively rank as the second-largest standing military force in NATO, after the US Armed Forces. Turkey joined the alliance in 1952.
The 2015 G20 Summit held in Antalya, Turkey, a founding member of the OECD (1961) and G20 (1999).
TAI Anka and Bayraktar TB2 are the unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) used by the Turkish Armed Forces.
TCG Anadolu (L-400) is an amphibious assault ship-aircraft carrier developed for the Turkish Navy
Feminist demonstration in Kadıköy, Istanbul on 29 July 2017
Turkish journalists protesting the imprisonment of their colleagues on Human Rights Day in 2016.
Istanbul Pride organized in 2003 for the first time. Since 2015, parades in Istanbul were denied permission by the government. The denials were based on security concerns, but critics claimed the bans were ideological. Despite the refusal hundreds of people defied the ban each year.
Topographic map of Turkey
Sumela Monastery in the Pontic Mountains, which form an ecoregion with diverse temperate rainforest types, flora and fauna in northern Anatolia.
A white Turkish Angora cat with odd eyes (heterochromia), which is common among the Angoras.
Köppen climate classification of Turkey
Istanbul is the largest city and financial centre of Turkey.
A proportional representation of Turkey's exports, 2019
Marmaris in the Turkish Riviera
Istanbul Airport main terminal building has an annual passenger capacity of 90 million and making it the world's largest airport terminal building under a single roof.
A TCDD HT80000 high-speed train of the Turkish State Railways
Göktürk-1, Göktürk-2 and Göktürk-3 are the Earth observation satellites of the Turkish Ministry of National Defense, while state-owned Türksat operates the Türksat series of communications satellites.
Total fertility rate in Turkey by province (2021)
CIA map of areas with a Kurdish majority
Sancaklar Mosque is a contemporary mosque in Istanbul
The Church of St. Anthony of Padua on İstiklal Avenue, in the Beyoğlu district of Istanbul. There are 234 active churches in the city.
Istanbul Technical University is the world's third-oldest technical university.
Istanbul University was founded in 1453 as a Darülfünûn. On 1 August 1933 it was reorganised and became the Republic's first university.
Acıbadem Hospital in Altunizade neighborhood of Üsküdar, İstanbul
Ortaköy Mosque is a good example of the Westernisation of Islamic-Ottoman architecture. Many Baroque architecture elements can be seen in it.
Ottoman miniature which can be linked to the Persian miniature tradition, as well as strong Chinese artistic influences.
Namık Kemal's works had a profound influence on Atatürk and other Turkish statesmen who established the Turkish Republic.
Nobel-laureate Turkish novelist Orhan Pamuk and his Turkish Angora cat at his personal writing space
Süreyya Opera House is situated in the Asian side of Istanbul and Atatürk Cultural Center is the main Opera House in the European side of the city.
Referred to as Süperstar by the Turkish media, Ajda Pekkan is a prominent figure of Turkish pop music, with a career spanning decades and a repertoire of diverse musical styles.
Barış Manço was a Turkish rock musician and one of the founders of the Anatolian rock genre.
Turkey won the silver medal at the 2010 FIBA World Championship.
VakıfBank S.K. has won the FIVB Volleyball Women's Club World Championship in 2017 and 2018, and the 2017–18 CEV Women's Champions League for the fourth time in their history.
TRT World is the international news platform of the Turkish Radio and Television Corporation.
The closing ceremony of the annual International Antalya Golden Orange Film Festival takes place at the Aspendos amphitheatre.

The region is home to Eurasian wildlife such as the Eurasian sparrowhawk, golden eagle, eastern imperial eagle, lesser spotted eagle, Caucasian black grouse, red-fronted serin, and wallcreeper.

It operates scheduled services to 315 destinations in Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas, making it the largest mainline carrier in the world by number of passenger destinations.

Iberian Peninsula and southern France, satellite photo on a cloudless day in March 2014

Iberian Peninsula

Iberian Peninsula and southern France, satellite photo on a cloudless day in March 2014
Northeast Iberian script from Huesca
A model recreating the Chalcolithic settlement of Los Millares
Iberia before the Carthaginian conquests circa 300 BC.
An instance of the Southwest Paleohispanic script inscribed in the Abóbada I stele.
Roman conquest: 220 BC - 19 BC
Germanic and Byzantine rule c. undefined 560
Islamic rule: al-Andalus c. undefined 1000
Two warriors embrace before the siege of Chincoya Castle (Cantigas de Santa Maria).
Map of the Iberian Peninsula and Northern Africa (inverted) by Fra Mauro (ca. 1450)
Iberian Kingdoms in 1400
Expelling of the moriscos in the Port of Denia
An anonymous picture depicting Lisbon, the centre of the slave trade, by the late 16th century.
Physical map of the Iberian Peninsula
Discharge of the Douro into the Atlantic Ocean near Porto
The Mulhacén, the highest peak in the Iberian Peninsula
Major Geologic Units of the Iberian Peninsula
Köppen climate types of Iberia
Satellite image of Iberia at night
An Iberian lynx

The Iberian Peninsula, also known as Iberia, is a peninsula in southwestern Europe, defining the westernmost edge of Eurasia.

Map of island countries: these states are not located on any continent-sized landmass, but they are usually grouped geographically with a neighbouring continent

Boundaries between the continents of Earth

[[File:Continents vide couleurs.png|thumb|300px|Color-coded map of continents:

[[File:Continents vide couleurs.png|thumb|300px|Color-coded map of continents:

Map of island countries: these states are not located on any continent-sized landmass, but they are usually grouped geographically with a neighbouring continent
The Mediterranean Sea, between Africa and Europe
The Atlantic Ocean around the plate boundaries
The Wallace, Weber, and Lydekker Lines, the three principal biogeographic boundaries in Wallacea
Atyrau, Kazakhstan
Pedestrian bridge over the Ural River in Orenburg in Russia. The bridge is between Asia and Europe
Road sign on the continental border between Asia and Europe near Magnitogorsk, Ural Mountains, Russia. It reads "Europe", above a crossed-out "Asia", as one enters Europe and leaves Asia
Panama with the Panama Canal
A map of the Nazca Plate (depicted in pink). It is considered to be a separate tectonic plate to the neighboring South American Plate, and contains several oceanic islands which have been associated with both Oceania and South America, such as Easter Island, Galápagos Islands and Juan Fernández Islands.
Conventions used for the boundary between Asia and Europe during the 18th and 19th centuries. The red line shows the most common modern convention, in use since {{circa|1850}} (see below).{{legend|#d2d0c5|Asia}}{{legend|#fcf9ea|Europe}}{{legend|#edfb9d|Historically placed in either continent}}
Red line "A" was commonly accepted in Russia and Kazakhstan during the Soviet Union era. The commonly accepted modern definition mostly fits with the lines "B" and "F" in this image.
{{legend|#5d66be|Transcontinental states, Asian territory}}{{legend|#9ac0ea|Transcontinental states, European territory}}

Eurasia

Europe

Animated, colour-coded map showing the various continents. Depending on the convention and model, some continents may be consolidated or subdivided: for example, Eurasia is most often subdivided into Asia and Europe (red shades), while North and South America are sometimes recognised as one American continent (green shades)

Continent

Any of several large landmasses.

Any of several large landmasses.

Animated, colour-coded map showing the various continents. Depending on the convention and model, some continents may be consolidated or subdivided: for example, Eurasia is most often subdivided into Asia and Europe (red shades), while North and South America are sometimes recognised as one American continent (green shades)
Map of island countries: these states are often grouped geographically with a neighbouring continental landmass
Reconstruction of the supercontinent Pangaea approximately 200 million years ago.
The Indian subcontinent
The Ancient Greek geographer Strabo holding a globe showing Europa and Asia
Medieval T and O map showing the three continents as domains of the sons of Noah—Asia to Sem (Shem), Europe to Iafeth (Japheth), and Africa to Cham (Ham).
Universalis Cosmographia, Waldseemüller's 1507 world map—the first to show the Americas separate from Asia
Hollandia Nova, 1659 map prepared by Joan Blaeu based on voyages by Abel Tasman and Willem Jansz, this image shows a French edition of 1663
Principal tectonic plates of the continents and the floor of the oceans

Ordered from largest in area to smallest, these seven regions are: Asia, Africa, North America, South America, Antarctica, Europe, and Australia.

Variations with fewer continents may merge some of these, for example some systems include Afro-Eurasia, the Americas or Eurasia as single continents.

Eurasian Economic Union

Meeting of the leaders of the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) in Bishkek, 2008. The CIS initiated the lengthy process of Eurasian integration.
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Current decision-making process of the Eurasian Customs Union and the Single Economic Space
Selection of GDP PPP data (top 10 countries and blocs) in no particular order
The Moscow International Business Center is a commercial district in Moscow that is currently under construction. The complex includes some of Europe's tallest skyscrapers.
A silver altyn minted in 1711 during the reign of Peter the Great
The Trans-Siberian Railway is a vital link between the Russian Far East and the rest of Eurasia.
The Turkestan–Siberia Railway connects the Central Asian republics to Siberia.
A Rye Field by Ivan Shishkin
Past and projected GDP (nominal) per capita in EAEU countries.
Free trade agreements of EEU. Red - EEU. Green - Countries that have FTA with EEU.
On 21 May 2014, Russia and China signed a $400 billion gas deal. Starting 2019, Russia plans to provide natural gas to China for the next 30 years.
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Ilham Aliyev, Dmitry Medvedev and Serzh Sarkisian hold peace talks in Moscow on 2 November 2008.
Mount Elbrus – Russia
Mountain range – Armenia
Lama River – in the Moscow region of Russia
Sharyn Canyon – Kazakhstan
On the southern shore of Issyk-Kul lake, Issyk-Kul Region – Kyrgyzstan
Winter – Belarus
A view of Mount Aragats from Aragatsotn – Armenia
A view of Mount Mönkh Saridag – Okinsky District, Russia
Lake Ayger – Armenia
Lake Servech – Belarus
Winter in the Altai Krai – Russia
Tian Shan mountain range – Kyrgyzstan
Saint Petersburg, the second-largest city and cultural capital of Russia
Yerevan, the capital and financial hub of Armenia
Business centre in central downtown Nur-Sultan
Almaty, the major commercial and cultural centre of Kazakhstan
Bishkek, the capital and financial hub of Kyrgyzstan

The Eurasian Economic Union (EAEU or EEU) is an economic union of some post-Soviet states located in Eurasia.

The Eurasian Economic Union is located at the eastern end of Europe, bounded by the Arctic in the north, the Pacific Ocean to the east and East Asia, the Middle East and part of Central Asia to the south.