European Commission

EU CommissionCommissionECThe European CommissionCommission of the European CommunitiesCommission of the European UnionEuropean Commission (EC)European CommissionerEuropean Innovation ScoreboardEU Commissioner
The European Commission (EC) is the executive branch of the European Union, responsible for proposing legislation, implementing decisions, upholding the EU treaties and managing the day-to-day business of the EU.wikipedia
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European Parliament

EU ParliamentEP constituencyMEP
It is common, although not a formal requirement, that the commissioners have previously held senior political positions, such as being a member of the European Parliament or a government minister.
Together with the Council of the European Union, it adopts European legislation, normally on a proposal from the European Commission.

Ursula von der Leyen

von der Leyenvon der Leyen, Ursula
One of the 28 is the Commission President (currently Ursula von der Leyen) proposed by the European Council and elected by the European Parliament.
Ursula Gertrud von der Leyen (born 8 October 1958) is a German politician and the President of the European Commission since 1 December 2019.

Von der Leyen Commission

Protecting our European Way of LifeVon der LeyenCoalition
The current Commission is the Von der Leyen Commission, which took office in December 2019, following the European Parliament elections in May of the same year.
The von der Leyen Commission is the current European Commission, in office since 1 December 2019.

Institutions of the European Union

EU institutionsinstitutionsEuropean institutions
This EU institution operates as a cabinet government, with 28 members of the Commission (informally known as "commissioners").

Treaties of the European Union

Article 21 of the EU TreatyEU treatiestreaties
The European Commission (EC) is the executive branch of the European Union, responsible for proposing legislation, implementing decisions, upholding the EU treaties and managing the day-to-day business of the EU.
Article 13 establishes the institutions in the following order and under the following names: the European Parliament, the European Council, the Council, the European Commission, the Court of Justice of the European Union, the European Central Bank and the Court of Auditors.

Brussels

Brussels, BelgiumBrussels-Capital RegionBruxelles
The Members of the Commission and their "cabinets" (immediate teams) are based in the Berlaymont building in Brussels.
Brussels is the de facto capital of the European Union, as it hosts a number of principal EU institutions, including its administrative-legislative, executive-political, and legislative branches (though the judicial branch is located in Luxembourg, and the European Parliament meets for a minority of the year in Strasbourg) and its name is sometimes used metonymically to describe the EU and its institutions.

Directorate-General

Directorates-GeneralDGDirectorate General
The term Commission is variously used, either in the narrow sense of the 28-member College of Commissioners (or College) or to also include the administrative body of about 32,000 European civil servants who are split into departments called directorates-general and services.

European Council

CouncilEU Council2007 EU Summit
The Commissioners are proposed by the Council of the European Union, on the basis of suggestions made by the national governments, and then appointed by the European Council after the approval of the European Parliament.
The European Commission remains the sole initiator of legislation, but the European Council is able to provide an impetus to guide legislative policy.

High Authority of the European Coal and Steel Community

High AuthorityHigh Authority of theHigh Authority of the ECSC
The first Commission originated in 1951 as the nine-member "High Authority" under President Jean Monnet (see Monnet Authority).
It was created in 1951 and disbanded in 1967 when it was merged into the European Commission.

Walter Hallstein

Walter Hallstein led the first Commission of the EEC, holding the first formal meeting on 16 January 1958 at the Château of Val-Duchesse.
He was the first president of the Commission of the European Economic Community and one of the founding fathers of the European Union.

Council of the European Union

CouncilCouncil of MinistersEU Council
The reason for the change in name was the new relationship between the executives and the Council.
It is one of two legislative bodies and together with the European Parliament serves to amend and approve the proposals of the European Commission.

Hallstein Commission

Hallstein Iempty chair crisisfirst commission
Walter Hallstein led the first Commission of the EEC, holding the first formal meeting on 16 January 1958 at the Château of Val-Duchesse.
The Hallstein Commission is the European Commission that held office from 7 January 1958 to 30 June 1967.

Supranational union

supranationalsupranationalismsupranational organisations
The European Commission derives from one of the five key institutions created in the supranational European Community system, following the proposal of Robert Schuman, French Foreign Minister, on 9 May 1950.
It defines the relationship between the High Authority or European Commission and the other four institutions.

European Union law

EU lawEuropean lawlaw of the European Union
Hallstein notably began the consolidation of European law and started to have a notable impact on national legislation.
The Commission is the executive branch.

European Coal and Steel Community

ECSCCoal and Steel CommunityEuropean Coal and Steel Community (ECSC)
Originating in 1951 as the High Authority in the European Coal and Steel Community, the Commission has undergone numerous changes in power and composition under various presidents, involving three Communities.
These would ultimately form the blueprint for today's European Commission, European Parliament, the Council of the European Union and the European Court of Justice.

Cabinet (government)

cabinetcouncil of ministerscabinets
This EU institution operates as a cabinet government, with 28 members of the Commission (informally known as "commissioners").
The supranational European Union uses a different convention: the European Commission refers to its executive cabinet as a "college", with its top public officials referred to as "commissioners", whereas a "European Commission cabinet" is the personal office of a European Commissioner.

Treaty of Rome

TFEUTreaties of RomeTEC
In 1958, the Treaties of Rome had established two new communities alongside the ECSC: the European Economic Community (EEC) and the European Atomic Energy Community (Euratom).
It also proposed the creation of a Common Agriculture Policy, a Common Transport Policy and a European Social Fund, and established the European Commission.

Common Agricultural Policy

agricultureCAPCommon Agriculture Policy
in 1965, however, accumulating differences between the French government of Charles de Gaulle and the other member states on various subjects (British entry, direct elections to Parliament, the Fouchet Plan and the budget) triggered the "empty chair" crisis, ostensibly over proposals for the Common Agricultural Policy.
During 3–12 July 1958 in Stresa, the Community held an agricultural conference attended by agricultural ministers from member states and the President of the European Commission, Walter Hallstein, along with observers representing agriculture.

Rey Commission

ReyJean Rey
Owing to the merger, the Rey Commission saw a temporary increase to 14 members—although subsequent Commissions were reduced back to nine, following the formula of one member for small states and two for larger states.
The Rey Commission is the European Commission that held office from 2 July 1967 to 30 June 1970.

Luxembourg City

LuxembourgCity of LuxembourgLuxembourg, Luxembourg
Commissioners swear an oath at the European Court of Justice in Luxembourg City, pledging to respect the treaties and to be completely independent in carrying out their duties during their mandate.
Several departments of the European Commission are also based in Luxembourg.

Malfatti Commission

MalfattiFranco Maria Malfatti
The Malfatti and Mansholt Commissions followed with work on monetary co-operation and the first enlargement to the north in 1973.
The Malfatti Commission is the European Commission that held office from 1 July 1970 to 21 March 1972.

Mansholt Commission

MansholtSicco Mansholt
The Malfatti and Mansholt Commissions followed with work on monetary co-operation and the first enlargement to the north in 1973.
The Mansholt Commission is the European Commission that held office from 22 March 1972 to 5 January 1973.

Ortoli Commission

OrtoliFrançois-Xavier Ortoli
With that enlargement, the Commission's membership increased to thirteen under the Ortoli Commission (the United Kingdom as a large member was granted two Commissioners), which dealt with the enlarged community during economic and international instability at that time.
The Ortoli Commission is the European Commission that held office from 6 January 1973 to 5 January 1977.

European Union

EUEuropeanEurope
The European Commission (EC) is the executive branch of the European Union, responsible for proposing legislation, implementing decisions, upholding the EU treaties and managing the day-to-day business of the EU.
The European Parliament is one of three legislative institutions of the EU, which together with the Council of the European Union is tasked with amending and approving the Commission's proposals.

Jenkins Commission (EU)

Jenkins CommissionJenkinsJenkins European Commission
Following the Jenkins Commission, Gaston Thorn's Commission oversaw the Community's enlargement to the south, in addition to beginning work on the Single European Act.
The Jenkins Commission was the European Commission that held office from 6 January 1977 to 6 January 1981.