Euthyphro

dialogueeponymous dialogue
Euthyphro (c. 399–395 BC), by Plato, is a Socratic dialogue whose events occur in the weeks before the trial of Socrates (399 BC), between Socrates and Euthyphro.wikipedia
69 Related Articles

Euthyphro (prophet)

Euthyphro
Euthyphro (c. 399–395 BC), by Plato, is a Socratic dialogue whose events occur in the weeks before the trial of Socrates (399 BC), between Socrates and Euthyphro.
Euthyphro of Prospalta (fl. 400 BCE) was an ancient Athenian religious prophet (mantis) best known for his role in his eponymous dialogue written by the philosopher Plato.

Plato

Plato's dialoguesDialogues of PlatoPlatonic dialogues
Euthyphro (c. 399–395 BC), by Plato, is a Socratic dialogue whose events occur in the weeks before the trial of Socrates (399 BC), between Socrates and Euthyphro.
Socrates presents the famous Euthyphro dilemma in the dialogue of the same name.

Trial of Socrates

Death of SocratesThe Trial of Socratestrial
Euthyphro (c. 399–395 BC), by Plato, is a Socratic dialogue whose events occur in the weeks before the trial of Socrates (399 BC), between Socrates and Euthyphro.
The extant, primary sources about the history of the trial and execution of Socrates are: the Apology of Socrates to the Jury, by Xenophon of Athens, a historian; and the tetralogy of Socratic dialogues — Euthyphro, the Socratic Apology, Crito, and Phaedo, by Plato, a philosopher who had been a student of Socrates.

Stoa Basileios

Basiliké Stoàthe court
The Euthyphro dialogue occurs near the court of the archon basileus (king magistrate), where Socrates and Euthyphro encounter each other; each man is present at the court for the preliminary hearings to possible trials (2a).
The front of the building was where Socrates met Euthyphro and had the conversation which Plato recreated in his Euthyphro.

Meletus

Euthyphro says that what lies behind the charge of impiety presented against Socrates, by Meletus and the others, is Socrates' claim that he is subjected to a daimon, (divine sign) which warns him of various courses of action.
In the Euthyphro, Plato describes Meletus as the youngest of the three prosecutors, having "a beak, and long straight hair, and a beard which is ill grown," and being unknown to Socrates prior to the prosecution.

Euthyphro dilemma

dilemmaEuthyphro problem
In reply, Socrates poses the question that would eventually become known in philosophy as the Euthyphro dilemma: "Is the pious loved by the gods because it is pious? Or is it pious because it is loved by the gods?".
The Euthyphro dilemma is found in Plato's dialogue Euthyphro, in which Socrates asks Euthyphro, "Is the pious loved by the gods because it is pious, or is it pious because it is loved by the gods?"

Dialectic

dialecticsdialecticalHegelian dialectic
Euthyphro seems unsure as to what the question means and so Socrates applies a dialectic technique: an analogy, to clarify his question (10a).
For example, in the Euthyphro, Socrates asks Euthyphro to provide a definition of piety.

Justice

justequitycivil justice
Yet, Socrates later says that the information provided in his question to Euthyphro is insufficient for a clear definition of "piety", because piety belongs to those actions we call just, that is, morally good; however, there are actions, other than pious actions, which we call just (12d); for example, bravery and concern for others.
A meditation on the Divine command theory by Plato can be found in his dialogue, Euthyphro.

Piety

piousreligiousChristianity
In an example of Socratic irony, Socrates says that Euthyphro obviously has a clear understanding of what is pious or holy (τὸ ὅσιον to hosion) and impious or unholy (τὸ ἀνόσιον to anosion).

Socratic dialogue

Socratic dialoguesPlatonic dialoguedialogue
Euthyphro (c. 399–395 BC), by Plato, is a Socratic dialogue whose events occur in the weeks before the trial of Socrates (399 BC), between Socrates and Euthyphro.

Divine command theory

divine commanddivine command theoristarbitrary will of God
The Euthyphro dilemma was proposed in Plato's dialogue between Socrates and Euthyphro.

Archon basileus

King Archon
The Euthyphro dialogue occurs near the court of the archon basileus (king magistrate), where Socrates and Euthyphro encounter each other; each man is present at the court for the preliminary hearings to possible trials (2a).

Murder

first-degree murderfirst degree murdersecond-degree murder
Euthyphro has come to present charges of murder against his own father who, after arresting one of his workers for killing a slave from the family estate on Naxos Island, tied him and threw him in a ditch where he died of exposure to the elements without proper care and attention (3e–4d) while Euthyphro's father awaited to hear from the exegetes (cf. Laws 759d) about how to proceed.

Naxos

NaxiansNaxos IslandNaxos, Greece
Euthyphro has come to present charges of murder against his own father who, after arresting one of his workers for killing a slave from the family estate on Naxos Island, tied him and threw him in a ditch where he died of exposure to the elements without proper care and attention (3e–4d) while Euthyphro's father awaited to hear from the exegetes (cf. Laws 759d) about how to proceed.

Exegesis

exegeticalexegeteBiblical exegesis
Euthyphro has come to present charges of murder against his own father who, after arresting one of his workers for killing a slave from the family estate on Naxos Island, tied him and threw him in a ditch where he died of exposure to the elements without proper care and attention (3e–4d) while Euthyphro's father awaited to hear from the exegetes (cf. Laws 759d) about how to proceed.

Lawsuit

litigationsuedcivil suit
Socrates is astonished by Euthyphro's confidence in being able to prosecute his own father for the serious charge of manslaughter, despite the fact that Athenian Law allows only relatives of the dead man to file suit for murder.

Irony

ironicironicallydramatic irony
In an example of Socratic irony, Socrates says that Euthyphro obviously has a clear understanding of what is pious or holy (τὸ ὅσιον to hosion) and impious or unholy (τὸ ἀνόσιον to anosion).

Sacred

holyholinesssanctity
In an example of Socratic irony, Socrates says that Euthyphro obviously has a clear understanding of what is pious or holy (τὸ ὅσιον to hosion) and impious or unholy (τὸ ἀνόσιον to anosion).

Daemon (classical mythology)

daemondaimondaemons
Euthyphro says that what lies behind the charge of impiety presented against Socrates, by Meletus and the others, is Socrates' claim that he is subjected to a daimon, (divine sign) which warns him of various courses of action.

Skepticism

skepticskepticalscepticism
(3b) From the perspective of some Athenians, Socrates expressed scepticism of the accounts about the Greek gods, which he and Euthyphro briefly discuss, before proceeding to the main argument of their dialogue: the definition of "piety".

Uranus (mythology)

UranusOuranosUranos
Moreover, Socrates further expresses critical reservations about such divine accounts that emphasise the cruelty and inconsistent behaviour of the Greek gods, such as the castration of the early sky-god Uranus, by his son Cronus; a story Socrates said is difficult to accept.

Cronus

KronosCronosSaturn
Moreover, Socrates further expresses critical reservations about such divine accounts that emphasise the cruelty and inconsistent behaviour of the Greek gods, such as the castration of the early sky-god Uranus, by his son Cronus; a story Socrates said is difficult to accept.

Theology

theologiantheologicaltheologians
Hence, the Euthyphro dialogue is technically important for the dialectics of theology, ethics, epistemology, and metaphysics.

Ethics

ethicalmoral philosophyethic
Hence, the Euthyphro dialogue is technically important for the dialectics of theology, ethics, epistemology, and metaphysics.

Epistemology

epistemologicalepistemictheory of knowledge
Hence, the Euthyphro dialogue is technically important for the dialectics of theology, ethics, epistemology, and metaphysics.