Eutychius of Constantinople

EutychiusPatriarch Eutychius of ConstantinoplePatriarch EutychiusEutychius, Patriarch of ConstantinopleEutichios
Eutychius (c. undefined 512 – 5 April 582), considered a saint in the Catholic and Orthodox Christian traditions, was the Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople from 552 to 565, and from 577 to 582.wikipedia
77 Related Articles

Second Council of Constantinople

Fifth Ecumenical CouncilFifth General CouncilCouncil of Constantinople
The subscription of Eutychius to the Acts of this synod, which was later recognized as the Fifth General Council and which concluded on 2 June 553, is a summary of the decrees against the Three Chapters.
Constantinople II was convoked by the Byzantine Emperor Justinian I under the presidency of Patriarch Eutychius of Constantinople.

Belisarius

Flavius BelisariusGeneral BelisariusBelisarius invades Africa
His father, Alexander, was a general under the famous Byzantine commander Belisarius.
The Patriarch Eutychius, who presided over this council in place of Pope Vigilius, was the son of one of Belisarius' generals.

Hagia Sophia

Haghia SophiaHagia Sophia MosqueAyasofya
In 562, he consecrated the new church of Hagia Sophia.
The Byzantine poet Paul the Silentiary composed a long epic poem (still extant), known as Ekphrasis, for the rededication of the basilica presided over by Patriarch Eutychius on 23 December 562.

Tiberius II Constantine

Tiberius IITiberiusTiberius Constantine
Justin II had succeeded Justinian in 565 and had associated with himself the young Tiberius.
There, sometime after 552, he was introduced by the Patriarch Eutychius to the future emperor, Justin II, with whom he became firm friends.

John Scholasticus

John III ScholasticusPatriarch John III of ConstantinopleJoannes Scholasticus
Upon the death of Joannes Scholasticus, whom Justinian had put in the patriarchal chair, the people of Constantinople demanded the return of Eutychius.
When Justinian, towards the close of his life, tried to raise the sect of the Aphthartodocetae to the rank of Orthodoxy and determined to expel Eutychius for his opposition, the able lawyer-ecclesiastic of Antioch, who had already distinguished himself by his great edition of the canons, was chosen to carry out the imperial will.

Pope Gregory I

Gregory the GreatPope Gregory the GreatGregory I
The future Pope Gregory the Great, then residing at Constantinople as Apocrisiarius, opposed this opinion, citing Luke 24:39.
During his papacy, he greatly surpassed with his administration the emperors in improving the welfare of the people of Rome, and he successfully challenged the theological views of Patriarch Eutychius of Constantinople before the emperor Tiberius II.

Aphthartodocetae

AphthartodocetismJulianistsAphthartodocetist
However, Eutychius came into violent collision with Justinian in 564, when the Emperor adopted the tenets of the Aphthartodocetae, a sect of Non-Chalcedonians who believed that Christ's body on earth was incorruptible (’aphthorá) and subject to no pain.
Patriarch Eutychius of Constantinople, who had presided over the Fifth General Council, resisted Justinian's efforts by arguing the incompatibility of the Aphthartodocetic beliefs with scripture.

Pope Vigilius

Vigiliuspope of the same name
Pope Vigilius was in Constantinople when Eutychius became patriarch.
Finally, Vigilius acknowledged in a letter of 8 December 553 to the Patriarch Eutychius the decisions of the Second Council of Constantinople and declared his judgment in detail in a Constitution of 26 February 554.

Eustratios of Constantinople

Among his pupils was Eustratios of Constantinople who wrote a tract against soul sleep.
Eustratios, Presbyter of Constantinople ( 590s) was a pupil of Patriarch Eutychius of Constantinople and writer.

Saint

saintssainthoodAll Saints
undefined 512 – 5 April 582), considered a saint in the Catholic and Orthodox Christian traditions, was the Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople from 552 to 565, and from 577 to 582.

Catholic Church

Roman CatholicCatholicRoman Catholic Church
undefined 512 – 5 April 582), considered a saint in the Catholic and Orthodox Christian traditions, was the Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople from 552 to 565, and from 577 to 582.

Eastern Orthodox Church

Eastern OrthodoxOrthodoxOrthodox Church
undefined 512 – 5 April 582), considered a saint in the Catholic and Orthodox Christian traditions, was the Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople from 552 to 565, and from 577 to 582.

Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople

Patriarch of ConstantinopleEcumenical PatriarchPatriarch
undefined 512 – 5 April 582), considered a saint in the Catholic and Orthodox Christian traditions, was the Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople from 552 to 565, and from 577 to 582.

Corpus Juris Canonici

Liber SextusCorpus Iuris CanoniciCorpus Juris
His feast is kept by the Orthodox Church on 6 April, and he is mentioned in the Catholic Church's "Corpus Juris".

Justinian I

JustinianEmperor JustinianJustinian the Great
His terms of office, occurring during the reign of Emperor Justinian the Great, were marked by controversies with both imperial and papal authority.

Phrygia

ancient PhrygiaPhrygia PacatianaPhrygia Salutaris
Eutychius was born at Theium in Phrygia.

Amasya

District of AmasyaAmaseiaAmasia
Eutychius became a monk at Amasea at the age of 30.

Archimandrite

archmandriteArchimandritArchimandrites
As an archimandrite at Constantinople, Eutychius was well respected by Menas.

Constantinople

ConstantinopolitanConstantinopolisConstantinopole
As an archimandrite at Constantinople, Eutychius was well respected by Menas.

Menas of Constantinople

Patriarch Menas of ConstantinopleMenasMennas
As an archimandrite at Constantinople, Eutychius was well respected by Menas.

Three-Chapter Controversy

Three ChaptersThe Three ChaptersThree Chapters Controversy
At the same time, the Pope urged him to summon and preside over the Church Council summoned to deal with the Three-Chapter Controversy.

Patriarch Apollinarius of Alexandria

ApollinariusApollinarius of AlexandriaApollinarius, Patriarch of Alexandria
In spite of the Pope's refusal, the council met on 5 May 553 at Constantinople, and Eutychius shared the first place in the assembly with Apollinarius of Alexandria and Domninus, called Domnus III of Antioch.

Non-Chalcedonianism

non-ChalcedonianNon-Chalcedoniansanti-Chalcedonian
However, Eutychius came into violent collision with Justinian in 564, when the Emperor adopted the tenets of the Aphthartodocetae, a sect of Non-Chalcedonians who believed that Christ's body on earth was incorruptible (’aphthorá) and subject to no pain.

Jesus

Jesus ChristChristJesus of Nazareth
However, Eutychius came into violent collision with Justinian in 564, when the Emperor adopted the tenets of the Aphthartodocetae, a sect of Non-Chalcedonians who believed that Christ's body on earth was incorruptible (’aphthorá) and subject to no pain.

Saint Timothy

TimothySt. TimothySt Timothy
On 22 January 565, Eutychius was celebrating the feast day of Saint Timothy in the church adjoining the Hormisdas Palace when soldiers broke into the patriarchal residence, entered the church, and carried him away.