Evacuation Day (New York)

Evacuation DayBritish evacuated New York Citythe last British forces left the cityBritish evacuate New YorkBritish evacuationBritish evacuation from New York Citydepartureleave New York Cityleft New York City1783 British evacuation of New York
Evacuation Day on November 25 marks the day in 1783 when British troops departed from New York City on Manhattan Island, after the end of the American Revolutionary War.wikipedia
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Manhattan

New YorkManhattan, New YorkNew York County
Evacuation Day on November 25 marks the day in 1783 when British troops departed from New York City on Manhattan Island, after the end of the American Revolutionary War. After this British Army evacuation, General George Washington triumphantly led the Continental Army from his former headquarters, north of the city, across the Harlem River, south down Manhattan, through the town to The Battery at the foot of Broadway. Washington's Continentals subsequently withdrew north and west out of the town and following the Battle of Harlem Heights and later action at the river forts of Fort Washington and Fort Lee on the northwest corner of the island along the Hudson River on November 16, 1776, evacuated Manhattan Island.
British occupation lasted until November 25, 1783, when George Washington returned to Manhattan, as the last British forces left the city.

History of New York City

New York CityNew YorkNew York Town
Evacuation Day on November 25 marks the day in 1783 when British troops departed from New York City on Manhattan Island, after the end of the American Revolutionary War.
George Washington triumphantly returned to the city that day, as the last British forces left the city.

George Washington

WashingtonGeneral WashingtonPresident Washington
After this British Army evacuation, General George Washington triumphantly led the Continental Army from his former headquarters, north of the city, across the Harlem River, south down Manhattan, through the town to The Battery at the foot of Broadway. Entry into the city under General George Washington was delayed until after a British flag which could be seen still flying had been removed: a British Union Flag had been nailed to a flagpole at Fort George on the Battery at the southern tip of Manhattan as a final act of defiance, and the pole was greased.
On November 25, the British evacuated New York City, and Washington and Governor George Clinton took possession.

Brooklyn

Brooklyn, New YorkKingsBrooklyn, NY
These men are memorialized, and many of their remains are interred, at the Prison Ship Martyrs' Monument in Fort Greene Park, Brooklyn.
One result of the Treaty of Paris in 1783 was the evacuation of the British from New York City, celebrated by residents into the 20th century.

Continental Army

ContinentalContinentalsAmerican
After this British Army evacuation, General George Washington triumphantly led the Continental Army from his former headquarters, north of the city, across the Harlem River, south down Manhattan, through the town to The Battery at the foot of Broadway. On September 21, 1776, the city suffered a devastating fire of uncertain origin after the evacuation of Washington's Continental Army at the beginning of the British Army occupation.
A detachment of those men from West Point reoccupied New York without incident on November 25. When Steuben's effort in July to negotiate a transfer of frontier forts with Major General Frederick Haldimand collapsed, however, the British maintained control over them, as they would into the 1790s.

The Battery (Manhattan)

the BatteryBattery ParkBattery
After this British Army evacuation, General George Washington triumphantly led the Continental Army from his former headquarters, north of the city, across the Harlem River, south down Manhattan, through the town to The Battery at the foot of Broadway. In the 1890s, the anniversary was celebrated in New York at Battery Park with the raising of the Stars and Stripes by Christopher R. Forbes, the great grandson of John Van Arsdale, with the assistance of a Civil War veterans' association from Manhattan—the Anderson Zouaves. Entry into the city under General George Washington was delayed until after a British flag which could be seen still flying had been removed: a British Union Flag had been nailed to a flagpole at Fort George on the Battery at the southern tip of Manhattan as a final act of defiance, and the pole was greased.
The Battery continued its function during the colonial era, and was the center of Evacuation Day celebrations commemorating the departure of the last British troops in the United States after the American Revolutionary War.

American Revolutionary War

Revolutionary WarAmerican RevolutionAmerican War of Independence
Evacuation Day on November 25 marks the day in 1783 when British troops departed from New York City on Manhattan Island, after the end of the American Revolutionary War.
The last British troops departed New York City on November 25, 1783, marking the end of British rule in the new United States.

George Washington's resignation as commander-in-chief

Washington resigned his commission as commander-in-chiefGeneral George Washington resigns his commission as commander-in-chiefGeneral Washington resigned his commission
At their session in the Old Senate Chamber, he made a short statement and offered his sword and the papers of his commission to the President and the delegates, thereby resigning as commander-in-chief.
After the Treaty of Paris ending the war had been signed on September 3, 1783, and after the last British troops left New York City on November 25, Washington resigned his commission as commander-in-chief of the Continental Army to the Congress of the Confederation, then meeting in the Maryland State House at Annapolis, Maryland, on December 23 of the same year.

David Mathews

David Mathews was Mayor of New York during the British occupation.
On our around Evacuation Day, Mathews left with other Loyalists to Nova Scotia, having had his two houses and 26,000 acres of land seized by the colonists.

Henry Knox

KnoxGeneral Henry KnoxGeneral Knox
Following the departure of the British, the city was secured by American troops under the command of General Henry Knox.
When the British withdrew the last of their troops from New York on November 21, 1783, Knox was at the head of the American forces that took over.

Battle of Fort Washington

Fort Washingtoncapturedcaptured Fort Washington
Washington's Continentals subsequently withdrew north and west out of the town and following the Battle of Harlem Heights and later action at the river forts of Fort Washington and Fort Lee on the northwest corner of the island along the Hudson River on November 16, 1776, evacuated Manhattan Island.
After seven years, on November 25, 1783, with the peace treaty signed, General Washington and Governor George Clinton triumphantly reclaimed Fort Washington as they marched toward lower Manhattan after the last British forces had left New York.

Fraunces Tavern

1975 bombing of Fraunces TavernBolton and Sigel's Tavernbombed a Wall Street bar
A week later, on December 4, at Fraunces Tavern, at Pearl and Broad Streets, General Washington formally said farewell to his officers with a short statement, taking each one of his officers and official family by the hand. The Sons of the Revolution fraternal organization continues to hold an annual 'Evacuation Day Dinner' at Fraunces Tavern.
A week after British troops had evacuated New York on November 25, 1783, the tavern hosted an elaborate "turtle feast" dinner, on December 4, 1783, in the building's Long Room for U.S. Gen. George Washington where he bade farewell to his officers of the Continental Army by saying "[w]ith a heart full of love and gratitude, I now take leave of you. I most devoutly wish that your latter days may be as prosperous and happy as your former ones have been glorious and honorable."

Bowery

the Bowerybouweriesbouwerie
There was also a traditional parade from near the current Cooper Union down the Bowery to the Battery.
The Bull's Head Tavern was noted for George Washington's having stopped there for refreshment before riding down to the waterfront to witness the departure of British troops in 1783.

Nathan Hale (statue)

Nathan HaleNathan Hale'' (statue)statue of Nathan Hale
On Evacuation Day 1893, the Nathan Hale statue currently in City Hall Park was unveiled.
Nathan Hale is an artistic work which was unveiled by the Sons of the Revolution in the State of New York during the celebration of Evacuation Day (New York), November 25, 1893.

History of New York City (1665–1783)

New York CityColonial New York CityColonial period of New York
New York City (occupying then only the southern tip of Manhattan, up to what is today Chambers Street), became, under Admiral of the Fleet Richard Howe, Lord Howe and his brother Sir William Howe, General of the British Army, the British political and military center of operations in British North America.
The anniversary of Evacuation Day, in which the last British troops and many Tory supporters and collaborators departed in November 1783, was long celebrated in New York.

New York City

New YorkNew York, New YorkNew York City, New York
In the 1890s, the anniversary was celebrated in New York at Battery Park with the raising of the Stars and Stripes by Christopher R. Forbes, the great grandson of John Van Arsdale, with the assistance of a Civil War veterans' association from Manhattan—the Anderson Zouaves.
When the British forces evacuated at the close of the war in 1783, they transported 3,000 freedmen for resettlement in Nova Scotia.

Thanksgiving (United States)

ThanksgivingThanksgiving DayGiving Thanks
The observance of the date was also diminished by the Thanksgiving Day Proclamation by 16th President Abraham Lincoln on October 3, 1863, that called on Americans "in every part of the United States, and also those who are at sea and those who are sojourning in foreign lands, to set apart and observe the last Thursday of November next as a day of thanksgiving."
The holiday superseded Evacuation Day, a de facto national holiday that had been held on November 25 each year prior to the Civil War and commemorated the British withdrawal from the United States after the American Revolution.

Greasy pole

Cockaigne polecucañagreasy
Entry into the city under General George Washington was delayed until after a British flag which could be seen still flying had been removed: a British Union Flag had been nailed to a flagpole at Fort George on the Battery at the southern tip of Manhattan as a final act of defiance, and the pole was greased.
By legend, on November 25, 1783, Evacuation Day, John Van Arsdale climbed up a flagpole deliberately greased by the British as they left New York City, in order to remove the Union Jack and replace it with the Stars and Stripes.

John Lafayette Riker

J. Lafayette RikerJohn L. RikerJohn L. Riker
John Lafayette Riker, the original commander of the Anderson Zouaves, was also a grandson of John Van Arsdale.
His mother, Elizabeth Van Arsdale, was the daughter of Captain John Van Arsdale of Revolutionary War and Evacuation Day fame.

Great Fire of New York (1776)

Great Fire of New Yorkfiresfires of 1776
On September 21, 1776, the city suffered a devastating fire of uncertain origin after the evacuation of Washington's Continental Army at the beginning of the British Army occupation.
Crime and poor sanitation were persistent problems during the British occupation, which did not end until they evacuated the city on November 25, 1783.

Fort Amsterdam

Fort GeorgeFort Jamesfort
Entry into the city under General George Washington was delayed until after a British flag which could be seen still flying had been removed: a British Union Flag had been nailed to a flagpole at Fort George on the Battery at the southern tip of Manhattan as a final act of defiance, and the pole was greased.
The Americans took over the fort in Manhattan on Evacuation Day, November 25, 1783, after the British pulled out.

Harry Van Arsdale Jr.

Harry Van ArsdaleHarry Van Arsdale, Jr.
A bicentennial of Evacuation Day in 1983 featured the labor leader Harry Van Arsdale, Jr. A commemorative plaque marking Evacuation Day was put on a flagpole at Bowling Green in 1996.
Van Arsdale was descendant from 17th century Dutch immigrants to New York and a descendant of John Van Arsdale, a Colonial army veteran of the American Revolutionary War, who climbed up a greased flagpole to retrieve a Union Jack flag which still flew during the evacuation of the British from New York.

Sons of the Revolution

Connecticut Society of the Sons of the RevolutionGeneral Society of the Sons of the RevolutionGeneral Society Sons of the Revolution
The Sons of the Revolution fraternal organization continues to hold an annual 'Evacuation Day Dinner' at Fraunces Tavern.
The New York society has organized infrequent Evacuation Day observances of the anniversary of the British departure on November 25, 1783, from New York after the Revolution.

Winter Garden Theatre (1850)

Winter Garden TheatreWinter GardenThe Winter Garden Theatre
On Evacuation Day 1864, the Booth brothers held a performance of Julius Caesar at the Winter Garden Theatre to raise funds for the Shakespeare statue later placed in Central Park.
This enterprise included a toga-clad, one-night production of Julius Caesar on the evening of November 25, 1864, Evacuation Day, played by Edwin and his brothers, John Wilkes Booth and Junius Brutus Booth, Jr..

Veteran Corps of Artillery of the State of New York

Veteran Corps of ArtilleryVeteran Corps of Artillery (VCA)Veteran Corps of Artillery State of New York
On Evacuation Day 1790, the Veteran Corps of Artillery of the State of New York was founded.
It was formed in Manhattan on Evacuation Day (New York), November 25, 1790, by Veterans of Washington's Continental Army Corps of Artillery.