Evangelicalism

evangelicalevangelical ChristianEvangelicalsEvangelical ChristianityEvangelical Protestantevangelical ChristiansEvangelical ChurchEvangelical ProtestantsEvangelical Protestantismevangelist
Evangelicalism, evangelical Christianity, or evangelical Protestantism, is a worldwide, trans-denominational movement within Protestant Christianity which maintains the belief that the essence of the Gospel consists of the doctrine of salvation by grace, solely through faith in Jesus's atonement.wikipedia
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Billy Graham

Billy Graham CrusadeRev. Billy GrahamBilly Graham Crusades
Among leaders and major figures of the evangelical Protestant movement were John Wesley, George Whitefield, Jonathan Edwards, Billy Graham, Bill Bright, Harold Ockenga, John Stott and Martyn Lloyd-Jones.
William Franklin Graham Jr. (November 7, 1918 – February 21, 2018) was an American evangelist, a prominent evangelical Christian figure, and an ordained Southern Baptist minister who became well-known internationally in the late 1940s.

George Whitefield

George WhitfieldWhitefieldReverend George Whitefield
Among leaders and major figures of the evangelical Protestant movement were John Wesley, George Whitefield, Jonathan Edwards, Billy Graham, Bill Bright, Harold Ockenga, John Stott and Martyn Lloyd-Jones.
George Whitefield (27 December 1714 – 30 September 1770), also spelled Whitfield, was an English Anglican cleric and evangelist who was one of the founders of Methodism and the evangelical movement.

First Great Awakening

Great AwakeningEvangelical Revivalevangelical awakening
Preeminently, John Wesley and other early Methodists were at the root of sparking this new movement during the First Great Awakening.
The Great Awakening marked the emergence of Anglo-American evangelicalism as a trans-denominational movement within the Protestant churches.

Evangelicalism in the United States

evangelicalevangelicalsEvangelical Protestant
The United States has the largest concentration of evangelicals in the world.
In the United States, evangelicalism is an umbrella group of Protestant Christians who believe in the necessity of being born again, emphasize the importance of evangelism, and affirm traditional Protestant teachings on the authority and the historicity of the Bible.

John Stott

John R. W. StottJohn R.W. StottThe Reverend Dr. John Robert Walmsley Stott
Among leaders and major figures of the evangelical Protestant movement were John Wesley, George Whitefield, Jonathan Edwards, Billy Graham, Bill Bright, Harold Ockenga, John Stott and Martyn Lloyd-Jones.
John Robert Walmsley Stott (27 April 1921 – 27 July 2011) was an English Anglican priest and theologian who was noted as a leader of the worldwide evangelical movement.

Methodism

MethodistMethodist ChurchMethodists
Its origins are usually traced to 1738, with various theological streams contributing to its foundation, including English Methodism, the Moravian Church (in particular its bishop Nicolaus Zinzendorf and his community at Herrnhut), and German Lutheran Pietism.
At a Moravian service in Aldersgate on 24 May 1738, John experienced what has come to be called his evangelical conversion, when he felt his "heart strangely warmed".

John Wesley

JohnWesleyanWesley
Preeminently, John Wesley and other early Methodists were at the root of sparking this new movement during the First Great Awakening.
On 24 May 1738 he experienced what has come to be called his evangelical conversion, when he felt his "heart strangely warmed".

Pietism

PietistpietisticPietists
Its origins are usually traced to 1738, with various theological streams contributing to its foundation, including English Methodism, the Moravian Church (in particular its bishop Nicolaus Zinzendorf and his community at Herrnhut), and German Lutheran Pietism.
There, it influenced Protestants of other ethnic backgrounds, contributing to the 18th-century foundation of evangelicalism, a movement within Protestantism that today has some 300 million followers.

Neo-charismatic movement

neocharismaticNeo-Pentecostalneo-charismatic
The main movements are Baptist churches, Pentecostalism, charismatic Evangelicalism, neo-charismatic Evangelicalism and nondenominational Evangelicalism.
The Neo-charismatic (also third-wave charismatic or hypercharismatic) movement is a movement within evangelical protestant Christianity.

Martyn Lloyd-Jones

D. Martyn Lloyd-JonesMartyn Lloyd JonesDavid Martyn Lloyd-Jones
Among leaders and major figures of the evangelical Protestant movement were John Wesley, George Whitefield, Jonathan Edwards, Billy Graham, Bill Bright, Harold Ockenga, John Stott and Martyn Lloyd-Jones.
David Martyn Lloyd-Jones (1899–1981) was a Welsh Protestant minister and medical doctor who was influential in the Reformed wing of the British evangelical movement in the 20th century.

Evangelical charismatic movement

charismaticEvangelical charismaticcharismatic Christian
The main movements are Baptist churches, Pentecostalism, charismatic Evangelicalism, neo-charismatic Evangelicalism and nondenominational Evangelicalism.
The Evangelical charismatic movement represents the evangelical churches that have an emphasis on the gifts of the Spirit.

Great Awakening

Great AwakeningsAwakeningfirst and second Great Awakenings
The movement gained great momentum during the 18th and 19th centuries with the Great Awakenings in Great Britain and the United States.
Each of these "Great Awakenings" was characterized by widespread revivals led by evangelical Protestant ministers, a sharp increase of interest in religion, a profound sense of conviction and redemption on the part of those affected, an increase in evangelical church membership, and the formation of new religious movements and denominations.

Jonathan Edwards (theologian)

Jonathan Edwards18th century Calvinist preacher of the same nameJohnathan Edwards
Among leaders and major figures of the evangelical Protestant movement were John Wesley, George Whitefield, Jonathan Edwards, Billy Graham, Bill Bright, Harold Ockenga, John Stott and Martyn Lloyd-Jones.
Edwards is well known for his many books, The End For Which God Created the World, The Life of David Brainerd, which inspired thousands of missionaries throughout the 19th century, and Religious Affections, which many Reformed Evangelicals still read today.

Religion in the United States

OthersAmerican religionreligion
American evangelicals are a quarter of the nation's population and its single largest religious group.
In 2007, members of evangelical churches comprised 26% of the American population, while another 18% belonged to mainline Protestant churches, and 7% belonged to historically black churches.

Biblical inerrancy

inerrancyinerrantinerrancy of the Bible
Many evangelicals believe in biblical inerrancy, while other evangelicals believe in biblical infallibility.
The belief is of particular significance within parts of evangelicalism, where it is formulated in the "Chicago Statement on Biblical Inerrancy".

Born again

born-again Christianborn again Christianborn-again
Evangelicals believe in the centrality of the conversion or "born again" experience in receiving salvation, in the authority of the Bible as God's revelation to humanity, and in spreading the Christian message. Many evangelical traditions adhere to the doctrine of the believers' Church, which teaches that one becomes a member of the Church by the new birth and profession of faith.
Born again, or to experience the new birth, is a phrase, particularly in evangelicalism, that refers to "spiritual rebirth", or a regeneration of the human spirit from the Holy Spirit, contrasted with physical birth.

Bill Bright

Bill
Among leaders and major figures of the evangelical Protestant movement were John Wesley, George Whitefield, Jonathan Edwards, Billy Graham, Bill Bright, Harold Ockenga, John Stott and Martyn Lloyd-Jones.
During the 1940s, Bill attended the First Presbyterian Church, Hollywood where he became an evangelical Christian.

Nondenominational Christianity

non-denominationalnon-denominational Christiannondenominational
The main movements are Baptist churches, Pentecostalism, charismatic Evangelicalism, neo-charismatic Evangelicalism and nondenominational Evangelicalism.
Often founded by individual pastors, they have little affiliation with historic denominations, but typically adhere to evangelical Protestantism, and are a type of Protestantism.

Believer's baptism

adult baptismbaptizedbelievers baptism
This originated in the Radical Reformation with Anabaptists but is held by denominations that practice believer's baptism.
Believer's baptism (occasionally called credobaptism, from the Latin word credo meaning "I believe") is the Christian practice of baptism as is understood by many evangelical denominations, particularly those that descend from the Anabaptist and English Baptist tradition.

Believers' Church

Believers ChurchBeliever's ChurchBelievers Church India
Many evangelical traditions adhere to the doctrine of the believers' Church, which teaches that one becomes a member of the Church by the new birth and profession of faith.
The believers' Church is a doctrine theological of Evangelical Christianity that teaches that one becomes a member of the Church by new birth and profession of faith.

Anabaptism

AnabaptistAnabaptistsAnabaptist Churches
This originated in the Radical Reformation with Anabaptists but is held by denominations that practice believer's baptism.
In the 21st century there are large cultural differences between assimilated Anabaptists, who do not differ much from evangelicals or mainline Protestants, and traditional groups like the Amish, the Old Colony Mennonites, the Old Order Mennonites, the Hutterites and the Old German Baptist Brethren.

Pentecostalism

PentecostalPentecostalsPentecostal Church
The main movements are Baptist churches, Pentecostalism, charismatic Evangelicalism, neo-charismatic Evangelicalism and nondenominational Evangelicalism.
Like other forms of evangelical Protestantism, Pentecostalism adheres to the inerrancy of the Bible and the necessity of accepting Jesus Christ as personal Lord and Savior.

Evangelical Anglicanism

evangelical AnglicanEvangelicalevangelical Anglicans
There are also evangelical Anglicans.
Evangelical Anglicanism or Evangelical Episcopalianism is a tradition or church party within Anglicanism that shares affinity with broader evangelicalism.

Evangelical Church in Germany

EvangelicalProtestantEvangelical Church
This usage is reflected in the names of Protestant denominations, such as the Evangelical Church in Germany (a union of Lutheran and Reformed churches) and the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America.
The German term evangelisch here more accurately corresponds to the broad English term Protestant rather than to the narrower evangelical (in German called evangelikal), although the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada and the Evangelical Lutheran Church of England use the term in the same way as the German church.

Evangelical theology

moderateevangelical
Evangelical Christianity brings together different movements of evangelical theology, the main ones being fundamentalism, conservative, moderate, liberal.
Evangelical theology is the teaching and doctrine that relates to spiritual matters in evangelical Christianity.