Evangelicalism in the United States

evangelicalevangelicalsEvangelical Protestantevangelical ProtestantsAmerican Evangelicalismevangelical Christianevangelical ProtestantismAmerican evangelicalAmerican evangelicalsEvangelical Christians
In the United States, evangelicalism is an umbrella group of Protestant Christians who believe in the necessity of being born again, emphasize the importance of evangelism, and affirm traditional Protestant teachings on the authority and the historicity of the Bible.wikipedia
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Evangelicalism

evangelicalevangelical ChristianEvangelicals
In the United States, evangelicalism is an umbrella group of Protestant Christians who believe in the necessity of being born again, emphasize the importance of evangelism, and affirm traditional Protestant teachings on the authority and the historicity of the Bible.
The United States has the largest concentration of evangelicals in the world.

Protestantism in the United States

ProtestantProtestantismAmerican Protestantism
In the United States, evangelicalism is an umbrella group of Protestant Christians who believe in the necessity of being born again, emphasize the importance of evangelism, and affirm traditional Protestant teachings on the authority and the historicity of the Bible.
Protestants are divided into many different denominations, which are generally classified as either "mainline" or "evangelical", although some may not fit easily into either category.

Abolitionism in the United States

abolitionistabolitionistsabolitionism
They were involved in the temperance movement and supported the abolition of slavery in addition to working towards education and criminal justice reform.
In the 17th century, enlightenment thinkers condemned slavery on humanistic grounds and English Quakers and some Evangelical denominations condemned slavery as un-Christian.

Second Great Awakening

Great AwakeningGreat RevivalThe Second Great Awakening
The Second Great Awakening of the 19th century led to what historian Martin Marty called the "Evangelical Empire", a period in which evangelicals dominated US cultural institutions, including schools and universities.
The revivals enrolled millions of new members in existing evangelical denominations and led to the formation of new denominations.

National Association of Evangelicals

National Association of Evangelicals Statement of Faitha convention of EvangelicalsNational Association of Evangelical
During this time period, a number of evangelical institutions were established, including the National Association of Evangelicals, Christianity Today magazine and a number of educational institutions, such as Fuller Theological Seminary.
The mission of the NAE is to honor God by connecting and representing evangelicals in the United States.

Christian right

religious rightconservative ChristianChristian conservative
As a reaction to the 1960s counterculture, many evangelicals became politically active and involved in the Christian right, which became an important voting bloc of the Republican Party.
In the United States, the Christian right is an informal coalition formed around a core of conservative evangelical Protestants and Roman Catholics.

Republican Party (United States)

RepublicanRepublican PartyR
As a reaction to the 1960s counterculture, many evangelicals became politically active and involved in the Christian right, which became an important voting bloc of the Republican Party.
After the Supreme Court's 1973 decision in Roe v. Wade, the Republican Party opposed abortion in its party platform and grew its support among evangelicals.

Congregationalism in the United States

CongregationalCongregationalistCongregational Church
Early American evangelicalism was shaped by the Puritans of New England (also known as Congregationalists), a 16th and 17th-century Calvinist movement originating in England.
The Congregational tradition has shaped both mainline and evangelical Protestantism in the United States.

First Great Awakening

Great AwakeningEvangelical Revivalevangelical awakening
The First Great Awakening of the 18th century marked the rise of evangelical religion in colonial America.
The blending of these three traditions would produce an evangelical Protestantism that placed greater importance "on seasons of revival, or outpourings of the Holy Spirit, and on converted sinners experiencing God's love personally."

Presbyterian Church in the United States of America

PresbyterianPresbyterian ChurchPresbyterian Church in the U.S.A.
In the Presbyterian Church, the dispute was known as the Old Side–New Side Controversy.
The theological tensions within the denomination were played out in the Fundamentalist–Modernist Controversy of the 1920s and 1930s, a conflict that led to the development of Christian fundamentalism and has historical importance to modern American Evangelicalism.

Harold Ockenga

Harold J. OckengaHarold John Ockenga
The term neo-evangelicalism was coined by Harold Ockenga in 1947 to identify a distinct movement within self-identified fundamentalist Christianity at the time, especially in the English-speaking world.
Harold John Ockenga (June 6, 1905 – February 8, 1985) was a leading figure of mid-20th-century American Evangelicalism, part of the reform movement known as "Neo-Evangelicalism".

Mainline Protestant

mainlinemainline ProtestantismMainline Protestants
As a result of the Fundamentalist–Modernist Controversy of the 1920s and 1930s, fundamentalists lost control of the Mainline Protestant churches and separated themselves from non-fundamentalist churches and cultural institutions.
The mainline Protestant churches (also called mainstream Protestant and sometimes oldline Protestant) are a group of Protestant denominations in the United States that contrast in history and practice with evangelical, fundamentalist, and charismatic Protestant denominations.

Christian left

Christian-leftistprogressive ChristianChristian leftist
While the evangelical left is related to the wider Christian left, those who are part of the latter category are not always viewed as evangelical.
In the United States, members of the Christian Left come from a spectrum of denominations: Peace churches, elements of the Protestant mainline churches, Catholicism, and some evangelicals.

Born again

born-again Christianborn again Christianborn-again
In the United States, evangelicalism is an umbrella group of Protestant Christians who believe in the necessity of being born again, emphasize the importance of evangelism, and affirm traditional Protestant teachings on the authority and the historicity of the Bible.

Evangelism

evangelistevangelizationevangelical
In the United States, evangelicalism is an umbrella group of Protestant Christians who believe in the necessity of being born again, emphasize the importance of evangelism, and affirm traditional Protestant teachings on the authority and the historicity of the Bible.

Biblical authority

authorityScriptural Authorityauthority of Scripture
In the United States, evangelicalism is an umbrella group of Protestant Christians who believe in the necessity of being born again, emphasize the importance of evangelism, and affirm traditional Protestant teachings on the authority and the historicity of the Bible.

Historicity of the Bible

The Bible and historyBiblical maximalismhistoricity
In the United States, evangelicalism is an umbrella group of Protestant Christians who believe in the necessity of being born again, emphasize the importance of evangelism, and affirm traditional Protestant teachings on the authority and the historicity of the Bible.

Baptists

BaptistBaptist ChurchBaptist minister
Nearly a quarter of the US population, evangelicals are diverse and drawn from a variety of denominational backgrounds, including Baptist, Mennonite, Methodist, Holiness, Pentecostal, Reformed and nondenominational churches.

Mennonites

MennoniteMennonitismMennonite Church
Nearly a quarter of the US population, evangelicals are diverse and drawn from a variety of denominational backgrounds, including Baptist, Mennonite, Methodist, Holiness, Pentecostal, Reformed and nondenominational churches.

Methodism

MethodistMethodist ChurchMethodists
Nearly a quarter of the US population, evangelicals are diverse and drawn from a variety of denominational backgrounds, including Baptist, Mennonite, Methodist, Holiness, Pentecostal, Reformed and nondenominational churches.

Nondenominational Christianity

non-denominationalnon-denominational Christiannondenominational
Nearly a quarter of the US population, evangelicals are diverse and drawn from a variety of denominational backgrounds, including Baptist, Mennonite, Methodist, Holiness, Pentecostal, Reformed and nondenominational churches.

Christian revival

revivalrevivalismrevivalist
As the revival spread throughout the Thirteen Colonies, evangelicalism united Americans around a common faith.

Thirteen Colonies

American coloniescoloniescolonial
As the revival spread throughout the Thirteen Colonies, evangelicalism united Americans around a common faith.

Martin E. Marty

Martin Marty
The Second Great Awakening of the 19th century led to what historian Martin Marty called the "Evangelical Empire", a period in which evangelicals dominated US cultural institutions, including schools and universities.

Northern United States

NorthNorthernNorthern states
Some evangelicals were strong advocates of reform, largely in the northern United States.