Evisceration (ophthalmology)

eviscerationorbital exenterationexenterationeye evisceration
An evisceration is the removal of the eye's contents, leaving the scleral shell and extraocular muscles intact.wikipedia
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Ocular prosthesis

glass eyeocular prostheticartificial eye
An ocular prosthetic can be fitted over the eviscerated eye in order to improve cosmesis.
An ocular prosthesis, artificial eye or glass eye is a type of craniofacial prosthesis that replaces an absent natural eye following an enucleation, evisceration, or orbital exenteration.

Endophthalmitis

inflammation inside the eye
The procedure is usually performed to reduce pain or improve cosmesis in a blind eye, as in cases of endophthalmitis unresponsive to antibiotics.
Endophthalmitis patients may also require an urgent surgery (pars plana vitrectomy), and evisceration may be necessary to remove a severe and intractable infection which could result in a blind and painful eye.

Human eye

eyeeyeseyeball
An evisceration is the removal of the eye's contents, leaving the scleral shell and extraocular muscles intact.

Sclera

sclerotizedwhites of the eyessclerae
An evisceration is the removal of the eye's contents, leaving the scleral shell and extraocular muscles intact.

Extraocular muscles

extraocular muscleeye muscleseye muscle
An evisceration is the removal of the eye's contents, leaving the scleral shell and extraocular muscles intact.

Cosmesis

cosmetic
The procedure is usually performed to reduce pain or improve cosmesis in a blind eye, as in cases of endophthalmitis unresponsive to antibiotics.

Visual impairment

blindblindnessvisually impaired
The procedure is usually performed to reduce pain or improve cosmesis in a blind eye, as in cases of endophthalmitis unresponsive to antibiotics.

Antibiotic

antibioticsantibacterialtopical antibiotic
The procedure is usually performed to reduce pain or improve cosmesis in a blind eye, as in cases of endophthalmitis unresponsive to antibiotics.

General anaesthesia

general anesthesiageneralgeneral anesthetic
Either general or local anesthetics may be used during eviscerations, with antibiotics and anti-inflammatory agents injected intravenously.

Local anesthetic

local anestheticslocal anaestheticLocal anesthetic toxicity
Either general or local anesthetics may be used during eviscerations, with antibiotics and anti-inflammatory agents injected intravenously.

Anti-inflammatory

antiinflammatoryanti-inflammatoriesanti-inflammatory drug
Either general or local anesthetics may be used during eviscerations, with antibiotics and anti-inflammatory agents injected intravenously.

Intravenous therapy

intravenousintravenouslyinjection into a vein
Either general or local anesthetics may be used during eviscerations, with antibiotics and anti-inflammatory agents injected intravenously.

Eddie Shannon

After consulting a doctor, he decided to have a certain type of surgery, known as an Evisceration, which involves removing parts of his eye.

Phantom eye syndrome

The phantom eye syndrome (PES) is a phantom pain in the eye and visual hallucinations after the removal of an eye (enucleation, evisceration).

Sympathetic ophthalmia

ophthalmia, sympatheticsympathetic blindness
Evisceration—the removal of the contents of the globe while leaving the sclera and extraocular muscles intact—is easier to perform, offers long-term orbital stability, and is more aesthetically pleasing, i.e., a greater measure of movement of the prosthesis and thus a more natural appearance.

Blast-related ocular trauma

ocular trauma
If damage to the globe is irreparable, the ophthalmologist may conduct a primary enucleation, evisceration (ophthalmology), or exenteration in the combat hospital.