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First Family of the United States

First FamilyFirst DaughterFirst Families
This central building, first constructed from 1792 to 1800, is home to the President of the United States and the First Family.
However, other close relatives of the President and First Lady, such as parents, grandchildren, stepchildren, and in-laws, may be classified as members of the First Family if they reside in the Executive Residence of the White House Complex.

White House Reconstruction

1948–to-1952 Truman reconstruction1949–52 reconstructionrenovation of the White House
A two-story sub-basement with mezzanine, created during the 1948–to-1952 Truman reconstruction, is used for HVAC and mechanical systems, storage, and service areas.
A century-and-a-half of wartime destruction and rebuilding, hurried renovations, additions of new services, technologies, an added Third Floor, and inadequate foundations brought the Executive Residence portion of the White House Complex to near-imminent collapse.

White House

The White HousePresident's HouseExecutive Mansion
The Executive Residence is the central building of the White House complex located between the East Wing and West Wing.
Reconstruction began almost immediately, and President James Monroe moved into the partially reconstructed Executive Residence in October 1817.

East Wing

East
The Executive Residence is the central building of the White House complex located between the East Wing and West Wing.
It is a two-story structure east of the White House Executive Residence, the home of the President of the United States.

White House Office of the Curator

White House Curatorcuratorcurator for the White House
As of 2010, this large central space, originally occupied by the kitchen in the early 1800s, had been subdivided into offices for the White House Curator and the United States Secret Service.
The office is located in the ground floor of the White House Executive Residence.

West Wing

In Celebration of the Centennial of the West Wing of the White House, 2002
The Executive Residence is the central building of the White House complex located between the East Wing and West Wing.
Adjoining the press secretary's office, in the colonnade between the West Wing and the Executive Residence is the James S. Brady Press Briefing Room along with work space for the White House press corps.

State Dining Room of the White House

State Dining Room2015 renovation of the State Dining RoomState
There were no floors in the East Room, the Blue Room, or the western third of the Cross Hall (which at that time extended all the way to the west, as the State Dining Room would not be extended all the way north until 1902).
The State Dining Room is the larger of two dining rooms on the State Floor of the Executive Residence of the White House, the home of the President of the United States in Washington, D.C. It is used for receptions, luncheons, larger formal dinners, and state dinners for visiting heads of state on state visits.

East Room

East Room of the White House
There were no floors in the East Room, the Blue Room, or the western third of the Cross Hall (which at that time extended all the way to the west, as the State Dining Room would not be extended all the way north until 1902).
The East Room was among the last rooms on the State Floor to be completed and used.

White House Chief Usher

Chief UsherWhite House UsherWhite House Assistant Chief Usher
After the 1948-to-1952 gutting and restoration of the White House, the northern space became the Chief Usher's office.
Physically, the Chief Usher is located in the Usher's Office on the State Floor of the White House, near the Cross Hall and Entrance Hall and beside the entrance to the North Portico.

White House Chief Floral Designer

Chief Floral Designerflower shop
As of 2010, this space continues to house the bowling alley, as well as the White House chocolatier, the office and workspace of the White House Chief Floral Designer, a cold storage room for flowers and other perishable items, a carpentry shop, and general workrooms.
The Chief Floral Designer heads a staff of four assistant designers, and works with the First Lady, Chief Usher, and White House Social Secretary to plan arrangements and decorations for State Dinners, receptions, and day-to-day placement throughout the ceremonial rooms and Executive Residence.

Truman Balcony

second-floor balcony
The Truman Balcony is accessed from this floor.
The Truman Balcony is the second-floor balcony of the Executive Residence of the White House, which overlooks the south lawn.

Red Room (White House)

Red RoomRedWhite House Red Room
To the east of this room was a President's Antechamber (later known as the Red Room).
When the Kennedy family first moved into the White House, the Red Room (along with other rooms on the State Floor of the White House) were arranged and decorated using existing items by Sister Parish, Mrs. Kennedy's long-time friend and interior decorator.

State dinner

state dinnersstate banquetforeign dignitaries
President James Monroe gave State Dinners in the Private Dining Room from 1817 to 1825, and subsequent presidents used it as a formal dining room for the First Family or as a space for official but small events.
When the president's office moved to the newly constructed West Wing, the Neoclassical remodeling of the Executive Residence's state rooms gave Theodore Roosevelt a perfect venue reflecting the United States' growing power and influence around the world.

White House china

china table servicecollection of state chinaObama State China service
First Lady Edith Wilson turned this room into the China Room in 1917 to display the Executive Residence's growing collection of White House china.
The White House Historical Association, a private foundation established by First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy to purchase furniture and decorative and fine arts for the Executive Residence, provided the funds for the purchase.

President of the United States

PresidentU.S. Presidentpresidential
This central building, first constructed from 1792 to 1800, is home to the President of the United States and the First Family.

HVAC

heatingclimate controlheater
A two-story sub-basement with mezzanine, created during the 1948–to-1952 Truman reconstruction, is used for HVAC and mechanical systems, storage, and service areas.

Air conditioning

air conditionerair-conditionedair-conditioning
This level was added during the 1948-to-1952 renovation, and contains the air conditioning and water softening equipment.

Incineration

incineratorincineratorsincinerated
The sub-basement and mezzanine also contain storage areas, the heating system, elevator machinery rooms, an incinerator, a medical clinic, a dentist's office, the electrical control system, a laundry room, and flatware and dishware storage.

James Hoban

Architect James Hoban designed the Ground Floor so that the kitchen was directly beneath the Entrance Hall, the door to the kitchen below the North Portico.

Entrance Hall

entrance
Architect James Hoban designed the Ground Floor so that the kitchen was directly beneath the Entrance Hall, the door to the kitchen below the North Portico.

United States Secret Service

Secret ServiceU.S. Secret ServiceUS Secret Service
As of 2010, this large central space, originally occupied by the kitchen in the early 1800s, had been subdivided into offices for the White House Curator and the United States Secret Service.

Pantry

pantriesbutler's pantrypantler
The storeroom to the east of the kitchen became a pantry in 1809, a meat locker in 1825, and then a flight of stairs leading to the State Floor by 1946.

Theodore Roosevelt

Teddy RooseveltRooseveltPresident Theodore Roosevelt
In 1902, President Theodore Roosevelt hired the architectural firm of McKim, Mead & White to renovate the White House.

McKim, Mead & White

McKim, Mead and WhiteMcKim, Mead, and WhiteCharles Follen McKim
In 1902, President Theodore Roosevelt hired the architectural firm of McKim, Mead & White to renovate the White House.