Expulsion of the Acadians

Great UpheavalGreat ExpulsionAcadian ExpulsionexpulsionexpelledLe Grand DérangementdeporteddeportationDeportation of the AcadiansAcadian deportation
The Expulsion of the Acadians, also known as the Great Upheaval, the Great Expulsion, the Great Deportation and Le Grand Dérangement, was the forced removal by the British of the Acadian people from the present day Canadian Maritime provinces of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island and northern Maine — parts of an area also known as Acadia.wikipedia
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New France

FrenchCanadaNouvelle-France
The Expulsion (1755–1764) occurred during the French and Indian War (the North American theatre of the Seven Years' War) and was part of the British military campaign against New France.
The British expelled the Acadians in the Great Upheaval from 1755 to 1764, which has been remembered on July 28 each year since 2003.

Nova Scotia

NSNova Scotia, CanadaNova Scotian
The Expulsion of the Acadians, also known as the Great Upheaval, the Great Expulsion, the Great Deportation and Le Grand Dérangement, was the forced removal by the British of the Acadian people from the present day Canadian Maritime provinces of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island and northern Maine — parts of an area also known as Acadia.
During the French and Indian War of 1754–63 (the North American theatre of the Seven Years' War of 1756–1763), the British deported the Acadians and recruited New England Planters to resettle the colony.

Acadians

AcadianAcadian settlersFrench
The Expulsion of the Acadians, also known as the Great Upheaval, the Great Expulsion, the Great Deportation and Le Grand Dérangement, was the forced removal by the British of the Acadian people from the present day Canadian Maritime provinces of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island and northern Maine — parts of an area also known as Acadia.
Though most Acadians remained neutral during the French and Indian War, the British, together with New England legislators and militia, carried out the Great Expulsion (Le Grand Dérangement) of the Acadians during the 1755–1764 period.

French and Indian War

French & Indian WarFrench and IndianSeven Years' War
The Expulsion (1755–1764) occurred during the French and Indian War (the North American theatre of the Seven Years' War) and was part of the British military campaign against New France.
In 1755, the British captured Fort Beauséjour on the border separating Nova Scotia from Acadia, and they ordered the expulsion of the Acadians (1755–64) soon afterwards.

Charles Lawrence (British Army officer)

Charles LawrenceGovernor Charles LawrenceCol. Charles Lawrence
Without making distinctions between the Acadians who had been neutral and those who had resisted the occupation of Acadia, the British governor Charles Lawrence and the Nova Scotia Council ordered them to be expelled.
Brigadier-General Charles Lawrence (14 December 1709 – 19 October 1760) was a British military officer who, as lieutenant governor and subsequently governor of Nova Scotia, is perhaps best known for overseeing the Expulsion of the Acadians and settling the New England Planters in Nova Scotia.

New Brunswick

NBProvince of New BrunswickNew Brunswick, Canada
The Expulsion of the Acadians, also known as the Great Upheaval, the Great Expulsion, the Great Deportation and Le Grand Dérangement, was the forced removal by the British of the Acadian people from the present day Canadian Maritime provinces of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island and northern Maine — parts of an area also known as Acadia.
Unable to make most of the Acadians sign an unconditional oath of allegiance, British authorities undertook a campaign to expel the Acadians in the initial periods of the Seven Years' War.

Seven Years' War

Seven Years’ WarSeven Years WarThe Seven Years' War
The Expulsion (1755–1764) occurred during the French and Indian War (the North American theatre of the Seven Years' War) and was part of the British military campaign against New France.
The first British action was the assault on Acadia on 16 June 1755 in the Battle of Fort Beauséjour, which was immediately followed by their expulsion of the Acadians.

Evangeline

Evangeline, A Tale of Acadieepic poem of the same nameEvangeline!
The American poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow memorialized the historic event in his poem about the plight of the fictional character Evangeline, which was popular and made the expulsion well known.
The poem follows an Acadian girl named Evangeline and her search for her lost love Gabriel, set during the time of the Expulsion of the Acadians.

Prince Edward Island

PEPEIP.E.I.
The Expulsion of the Acadians, also known as the Great Upheaval, the Great Expulsion, the Great Deportation and Le Grand Dérangement, was the forced removal by the British of the Acadian people from the present day Canadian Maritime provinces of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island and northern Maine — parts of an area also known as Acadia. Acadians fled initially to Francophone colonies such as Canada, the uncolonized northern part of Acadia, Île Saint-Jean (present-day Prince Edward Island) and Île Royale (present-day Cape Breton Island).
The population grew to nearly 5,000 the late 1740s and early 1750s, as Acadians from Nova Scotia fled to the island during the Acadian Exodus, and the subsequent British-ordered expulsions beginning in 1755.

Charles Deschamps de Boishébert et de Raffetot

Charles Deschamps de BoishébertBoishébertBoishebert
During the expulsion, French Officer Charles Deschamps de Boishébert led the Mi'kmaq and the Acadians in a guerrilla war against the British.
Charles Deschamps de Boishébert (also known as Courrier du Bois, Bois Hebert) was a member of the Compagnies Franches de la Marine and was a significant leader of the Acadian militia's resistance to the Expulsion of the Acadians.

Cape Breton Island

Cape BretonCape Breton, Nova ScotiaC'''ape Breton Island
Acadians fled initially to Francophone colonies such as Canada, the uncolonized northern part of Acadia, Île Saint-Jean (present-day Prince Edward Island) and Île Royale (present-day Cape Breton Island).
Acadians who had been expelled from Nova Scotia and Île Royale were permitted to settle in Cape Breton beginning in 1764, and established communities in north-western Cape Breton, near Cheticamp, and southern Cape Breton, on and near Isle Madame.

Miꞌkmaq

Mi'kmaqMicmacMi'kmaq people
Along with the British achieving their military goals of defeating Louisbourg and weakening the Mi'kmaq and Acadian militias, the result of the Expulsion was the devastation of both a primarily civilian population and the economy of the region.
During the French and Indian War, the North American front of the Seven Years' War between France and Britain in Europe, the Miꞌkmaq assisted the Acadians in resisting the British during the Expulsion.

Moncton

Moncton, New BrunswickMoncton, CanadaMoncton, NB
They arrived at present day Moncton and Danks' Rangers ambushed about thirty Acadians who were led by Joseph Broussard (Beausoleil).
This action came to be known as the "Great Upheaval".

Windsor, Nova Scotia

WindsorTown of WindsorTownship of Windsor
The campaign started at Chignecto and then quickly moved to Grand-Pré, Piziquid (Falmouth/Windsor, Nova Scotia) and finally Annapolis Royal.
Cobequid remained without a fort.) Many Acadians left this region in the Acadian Exodus, which preceded the Expulsion of the Acadians.

Moses Hazen

General Hazen
Monckton was accompanied by New England Rangers led by Joseph Goreham, Captain Benoni Danks, Moses Hazen and George Scott.
His service included particularly brutal raids, during the Expulsion of the Acadians and the 1759 Siege of Quebec.

Lunenburg, Nova Scotia

LunenburgOld Town LunenburgTown of Lunenburg
Approximately 55 Acadians, who escaped the initial deportation at Annapolis Royal, are reported to have made their way to the Cape Sable region—which included south western Nova Scotia—from where they participated in numerous raids on Lunenburg, Nova Scotia.
In 1755, after the Expulsion of the Acadians, the British needed to repopulate vacated lands, and offered generous land grants to colonists from New England, which was experiencing a severe land shortage.

Shelburne County, Nova Scotia

Shelburne CountyShelburneCounty of Shelburne
The Cape Sable campaign involved the British removing Acadians from present-day Shelburne County and Yarmouth County.
The area had previously been settled by French-speaking Catholic Acadians, many of whom had been deported to British Colonies.

Robert Monckton

MoncktonGeneral MoncktonHon. Robert Monckton
Colonel Robert Monckton led a force of 1,150 British soldiers to destroy the Acadian settlements along the banks of the Saint John River until they reached the largest village of Sainte-Anne des Pays-Bas (Fredericton, New Brunswick) in February 1759.
Monckton is also remembered for his role in a number of other important events in the French and Indian War (the North American theatre of the Seven Years' War), most notably the capture of Fort Beausejour in Acadia, and the island of Martinique in the West Indies, as well as for his role in the deportation of the Acadians from British controlled Nova Scotia and also from French-controlled Acadia (present-day New Brunswick).

Fredericton

Fredericton, New BrunswickFredericton, NBCity of Fredericton
Colonel Robert Monckton led a force of 1,150 British soldiers to destroy the Acadian settlements along the banks of the Saint John River until they reached the largest village of Sainte-Anne des Pays-Bas (Fredericton, New Brunswick) in February 1759.
Anne's Point during the expulsion of the Acadians, burning the settlement to the ground in the St. John River Campaign (1759) during the French and Indian War, the North American front of their Seven Years' War in Europe against France.

Nova Scotia Council

Council
Without making distinctions between the Acadians who had been neutral and those who had resisted the occupation of Acadia, the British governor Charles Lawrence and the Nova Scotia Council ordered them to be expelled.
On July 28, Council Members Green, Collier, Cotterell, Rous and Belcher along with admirals Edward Boscawen and Savage Mostyn unanimously decided to expel the Acadians.

Battle of Petitcodiac

PetitcodiacBattle of the Petitcodiacdetachment at Petitcodiac
The Acadians and Mi'kmaq resisted in the Chignecto region and were victorious in the Battle of Petitcodiac (1755).
After the capture of Fort Beauséjour in June 1755 by British troops during the Seven Years' War, they began rounding up and deporting the local French population.

Gagetown, New Brunswick

GagetownVillage of GagetownGagetown (village)
Then they moved up the river and raided Grimross (Gagetown, New Brunswick), Jemseg, and finally reached Sainte-Anne des Pays-Bas.
Gagetown was originally named Grimross by the Acadians and Maliseet, who lived there prior to the Expulsion of the Acadians.

Acadia

Acadiel'AcadieHistory of Acadia
The Expulsion of the Acadians, also known as the Great Upheaval, the Great Expulsion, the Great Deportation and Le Grand Dérangement, was the forced removal by the British of the Acadian people from the present day Canadian Maritime provinces of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island and northern Maine — parts of an area also known as Acadia.
This process began in 1755, after the British captured Fort Beauséjour and began the expulsion of the Acadians with the Bay of Fundy Campaign.

Battle of Bloody Creek (1757)

Battle of Bloody CreekBloody Creek1757
They were victorious in the Battle of Bloody Creek (1757).
Following the French defeat at the Battle of Fort Beauséjour and the start of the Great Expulsion in 1755, many Acadians formed guerrilla bands in the forests, often linking up with their historic Mi'kmaq allies.

History of the French in Baltimore

BaltimoreFrance, CanadaFrench
Approximately 1,000 Acadians went to the Colony of Maryland, where they lived in a section of Baltimore that became known as French Town.
The earliest wave of French immigration began in the mid-1700s, bringing many Acadian refugees from Canada's Maritime Provinces.