Eye movement

eye movementsversionmovements of the eyeexcyclotorsionincyclotorsionmovementextorteye motioneye movement disorderseyes
Eye movement includes the voluntary or involuntary movement of the eyes, helping in acquiring, fixating and tracking visual stimuli.wikipedia
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Eye tracking

eye trackereye-trackingeyetracking
Eye movement includes the voluntary or involuntary movement of the eyes, helping in acquiring, fixating and tracking visual stimuli.
An eye tracker is a device for measuring eye positions and eye movement.

Extraocular muscles

extraocular muscleeye muscleseye muscle
The eyes are the visual organs of the human body, and move using a system of six muscles.
The extraocular muscles are the six muscles that control movement of the eye and one muscle that controls eyelid elevation (levator palpebrae).

Rapid eye movement sleep

REMREM sleeprapid eye movement
A special type of eye movement, rapid eye movement, occurs during REM sleep.
Most of the eye movements in “rapid eye movement” sleep are in fact less rapid than those normally exhibited by waking humans.

Oculomotor nerve

oculomotorIIIcranial nerve III
The muscles are supplied by the oculomotor nerve, with the exception of the superior oblique, which is supplied by the trochlear nerve, and the lateral rectus, supplied by the abducens nerve.
It enters the orbit via the superior orbital fissure and innervates extrinsic eye muscles that enable most movements of the eye and that raise the eyelid.

Lateral rectus muscle

lateral rectuslaterallateral recti
The six muscles are the lateral, medial, inferior and superior rectus muscles, and the inferior and superior oblique muscles.
It is one of six extraocular muscles that control the movements of the eye.

Supplementary eye field

supplementary eye fields
Frontal lobe – frontal eye fields (FEF), medial eye fields (MEF), supplementary eye fields (SEF), dorsomedial frontal cortex (DMFC)
Supplementary eye field (SEF) is the name for the anatomical area of the dorsal medial frontal lobe of the primate cerebral cortex that is indirectly involved in the control of saccadic eye movements.

Vergence

convergenceconvergedivergence
It may be classified according to the involvement of one or both eyes; involving one eye they may be classified as duction, and both eyes either version, if moving in the same direction, or vergence, if moving in opposite directions.
A vergence is the simultaneous movement of both eyes in opposite directions to obtain or maintain single binocular vision.

Medial eye fields

Frontal lobe – frontal eye fields (FEF), medial eye fields (MEF), supplementary eye fields (SEF), dorsomedial frontal cortex (DMFC)
Medial eye fields are areas in the frontal lobe of the primate brain that play a role in visually guided eye movement.

Paramedian pontine reticular formation

Paramedian pontine reticular formation
It is involved in the coordination of eye movements, particularly horizontal gaze and saccades.

Visual cortex

primary visual cortexstriate cortexV1
These signals travel along the optic nerve fibers to the brain, where they are interpreted as vision in the visual cortex.
The MT in primates is thought to play a major role in the perception of motion, the integration of local motion signals into global percepts, and the guidance of some eye movements.

Vestibulo–ocular reflex

vestibulo-ocular reflexoculocephalic reflexoculovestibular reflex
These include providing the conscious perception of vision, as well as areas that facilitate tracking.
The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) is a reflex, where activation of the vestibular system causes eye movement.

Duction

It may be classified according to the involvement of one or both eyes; involving one eye they may be classified as duction, and both eyes either version, if moving in the same direction, or vergence, if moving in opposite directions.
A duction is an eye movement involving only one eye.

Frontal eye fields

frontal eye field frontal eye fields (FEF)oculo-motor
Frontal lobe – frontal eye fields (FEF), medial eye fields (MEF), supplementary eye fields (SEF), dorsomedial frontal cortex (DMFC)
The frontal eye field is reported to be activated during the initiation of eye movements, such as voluntary saccades and pursuit eye movements.

Superior rectus muscle

superior rectussuperiorsuperior recti
The six muscles are the lateral, medial, inferior and superior rectus muscles, and the inferior and superior oblique muscles.
It elevates, adducts, and helps intort (rotate medially) the eye.

Saccade

saccadessaccadicsaccadic eye movements
Primates and many other vertebrates use three types of voluntary eye movement to track objects of interest: smooth pursuit, vergence shifts and saccades.
A saccade (, French for jerk) is a quick, simultaneous movement of both eyes between two or more phases of fixation in the same direction.

Medial longitudinal fasciculus

medial
Medial longitudinal fasciculus
A lesion of the MLF produces slowed or absent adduction of the ipsilateral eye, usually associated with involuntary jerky eye movements (nystagmus) of the abducting eye, a syndrome called internuclear ophthalmoplegia.

Nystagmus

nystagmus, pathologicinvoluntary eye movementsnystagmus, congenital
* Patients with eye movement disorders may report diplopia, nystagmus, poor visual acuity or cosmetic blemish from squint of the eyes.
Nystagmus is a condition of involuntary (or voluntary, in rare cases) eye movement, acquired in infancy or later in life, that may result in reduced or limited vision.

Inferior rectus muscle

inferior rectusinferiorinferior recti
The six muscles are the lateral, medial, inferior and superior rectus muscles, and the inferior and superior oblique muscles.
It depresses, adducts, and helps extort the eye.

Hering's law of equal innervation

HeringHering’s law of equal innervation
Hering's law of equal innervation
Hering's law of equal innervation is used to explain the conjugacy of saccadic eye movement in stereoptic animals.

Eye

eyesoculareyeball
These muscles arise from the common tendinous ring in the orbit, the eye cavity, and attach to the eyeball.
Eye movement

Eye movement in scene viewing

Eye movement in scene viewing refers to the visual processing of information presented in scenes.
Eye movement in scene viewing refers to the visual processing of information presented in scenes.

Superior colliculus

optic tectumsuperior colliculicolliculi
Superior colliculus
In primates, eye movements can be divided into several types: fixation, in which the eyes are directed toward a motionless object, with eye movements only to compensate for movements of the head; smooth pursuit, in which the eyes move steadily to track a moving object; saccades, in which the eyes move very rapidly from one location to another; and vergence, in which the eyes move simultaneously in opposite directions to obtain or maintain single binocular vision.

Ophthalmoparesis

ophthalmoplegiadifficulty moving the eyesextraocular muscle paresis
Ophthalmoparesis
Ophthalmoparesis or ophthalmoplegia refers to weakness (-paresis) or paralysis (-plegia) of one or more extraocular muscles which are responsible for eye movements.

Opsoclonus

opsoclonic disorder
Opsoclonus
Opsoclonus refers to uncontrolled eye movement.

Gaze-contingency paradigm

gaze contingent displaygaze-contingent techniquesperipheral information
Gaze-contingency paradigm
Gaze-contingent techniques are part of the eye movement field of study in psychology.