Lombard standard bearer re-entering Milan in 1167 (the year of the League's foundation) after its destruction in 1162 by Emperor Frederick I. Bas-relief Porta Romana, Milan (1171)
16th century woodcut of Ezzelino III da Romano.
Member cities of the first and second Lombard League.
Activities of Ezzelino III da Romano.
Lombard milites depicted on the Porta Romana relief of 1171
A Bronze replica of the Peace of Constance in Konstanz. Illustrating the comunes of the Lombard League in 1183.
Medieval miniature depicting the Battle of Cortenuova (1237)
Medieval miniature depicting the Battle of Parma (1248)
Medieval miniature depicting the Battle of Fossalta (1249)

Formed at Pontida on 1 December 1167, the Lombard League included—beside Verona, Padua, Vicenza and Venice—cities like Crema, Cremona, Mantua, Piacenza, Bergamo, Brescia, Milan, Genoa, Bologna, Modena, Reggio Emilia, Treviso, Vercelli, Lodi, Parma, Ferrara and even some lords, such as the Marquis Malaspina and Ezzelino da Romano.

- Lombard League

At this time control over Verona was important because Frederick II was in conflict with the Second Lombard League, an alliance of cities in Northern Italy.

- Ezzelino III da Romano
Lombard standard bearer re-entering Milan in 1167 (the year of the League's foundation) after its destruction in 1162 by Emperor Frederick I. Bas-relief Porta Romana, Milan (1171)

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Overall

Padua

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City and comune in Veneto, northern Italy.

City and comune in Veneto, northern Italy.

Remnants of Padua's Roman amphitheatre wall
The Botanical Garden of Padova today; in the background, the Basilica of Sant'Antonio
Tomb of Antenor
The unfinished façade of Padua Cathedral
Clock tower and Lion of St. Mark, symbol of the Serenissima Repubblic
Last Judgment by Giotto, part of the Scrovegni Chapel.
Palazzo della Ragione
Botanical Garden (Orto Botanico).
Street tram in Padua
This tempera, Two Christians before the Judges, hangs in the city's Cathedral.
The apse area of Santa Sofia.
The "Gran Guardia" loggia
Prato della Valle (detail)
Loggia Amulea, as seen from Prato della Valle
Torre degli Anziani as seen from Piazza della Frutta
The Astronomical clock as seen from Piazza dei Signori

The temporary success of the Lombard League helped to strengthen the towns.

In 1236 Frederick II found little difficulty in establishing his vicar Ezzelino III da Romano in Padua and the neighbouring cities, where he practised frightful cruelties on the inhabitants.

Verona

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City on the Adige River in Veneto, Italy, with 258,031 inhabitants.

City on the Adige River in Veneto, Italy, with 258,031 inhabitants.

The Roman Ponte Pietra in Verona
Equestrian statue of Cangrande I
The Lion of Saint Mark, located in Piazza delle Erbe, the symbol of the Venetian Republic
The Arche scaligere, tombs of the ancient lords of Verona
Panoramic view of the city from Castel San Pietro
Palazzo Barbieri is Verona City Hall
Palazzo del Governo is the seat of the Province of Verona
The Ponte Scaligero, completed in 1356
Verona Arena
Piazza delle Erbe
Porta Borsari
Piazza dei Signori
San Zeno Basilica, like many other Veronese churches, is built with alternating layers of white stone and bricks
The balcony of Juliet's house
The Portoni della Bra
The Verona Cathedral
The Santa Maria Antica
The Sant'Anastasia
The San Giorgio in Braida
An ATV bus in Verona
Verona Porta Nuova railway station
Verona airport

In 1164 Verona joined with Vicenza, Padua and Treviso to create the Veronese League, which was integrated with the Lombard League in 1167 to battle against Frederick I Barbarossa.

When Ezzelino III da Romano was elected podestà in 1226, he converted the office into a permanent lordship.

Vicenza

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City in northeastern Italy.

City in northeastern Italy.

Piazza dei Signori
Basilica Palladiana
Piazza dei Signori
Basilica Palladiana with clock tower
A night view of the Basilica Palladiana
The three-dimensional stage of the Teatro Olimpico in Vicenza
Palazzo Thiene Bonin Longare, designed by Palladio and built by Vincenzo Scamozzi
Porta Castello Tower
Plaque for Vicenza in the UNESCO World Heritage List
A plate of Baccalà alla vicentina, a typical dish of the city

It took an active part in the League with Verona and, most of all, in the Lombard League (1164–1167) against Emperor Frederick I Barbarossa compelling Padua and Treviso to join: its podestà, Ezzelino II il Balbo, was captain of the league.

A gold augustalis bearing Frederick's effigy

Frederick II, Holy Roman Emperor

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King of Sicily from 1198, King of Germany from 1212, King of Italy and Holy Roman Emperor from 1220 and King of Jerusalem from 1225.

King of Sicily from 1198, King of Germany from 1212, King of Italy and Holy Roman Emperor from 1220 and King of Jerusalem from 1225.

A gold augustalis bearing Frederick's effigy
A gold augustalis bearing Frederick's effigy
Arms of the House of Hohenstaufen.
Arms of the House of Hohenstaufen as Holy Roman Emperor.
Frederick's birth in Jesi (illustration in Giovanni Villani's Nuova Cronica, ca. 1348)
Seals used by Frederick as Emperor (ed. Otto Posse 1909):
1: first imperial seal (1221–1225),
2: second imperial seal (1226),
3: third imperial seal, addition of the title of King of Jerusalem (1226–1250)
4: seal used in 1221 and 1225,
5: first seal as King of Jerusalem (1233).
An augustale coin of Frederick II, from the Messina mint of Sicily, struck some time after 1231
Frederick II (left) meets Al-Kamil (right). Nuova Cronica, c. 1348.
A statue of Frederick II from the Black Tower of Regensburg, c. 1280–1290.
The victorious Battle of Cortenuova against the 2nd Lombard League (1237), Nuova Cronica (c. 1348).
Frederick II's troops paid with leather coins during the sieges of Brescia and Faenza, Nuova Cronica (c. 1348).
Battle of Giglio, against Gregory IX (1241), miniature in Chronica Maiora (1259).
Contemporary bust of Frederick II in Barletta
Castel del Monte, in Andria, Apulia, Italy.
Frederick II being excommunicated by Pope Innocent IV
The porphyry sarcophagus of Frederick II in the Cathedral of Palermo
A 1781 picture showing the mummified corpse of Frederick II in Palermo
Stained glass windows from the Strasbourg Cathedral, Bas-Rhin, Alsace, France, dated circa 1210–1270, depicting emperors of the Holy Roman Empire: Philip of Swabia, Henry IV, Henry V, and Frederick II

Those assembled responded with the reformation of the Lombard League, which had already defeated his grandfather Frederick Barbarossa in the 12th century, and again Milan was chosen as the league's leader.

Enzo was not in the city and could do nothing more than ask for help from his father, who came back to lay siege to the rebels, together with his friend Ezzelino III da Romano, tyrant of Verona.