Führer

FuhrerFührer und ReichskanzlerEin Volk, ein Reich, ein FührerFuehrerFørerLeaderDer Führerdictator of GermanyFührer of the German ReichGerman Führer
Führer (, spelled Fuehrer when the umlaut is not available) is a German word meaning "leader" or "guide".wikipedia
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Adolf Hitler

HitlerFührerthe leader
As a political title it is associated with the Nazi dictator Adolf Hitler.
He rose to power as Chancellor of Germany in 1933, and as Führer in 1934.

Nazi Germany

Third ReichGermanGermany
As a political title it is associated with the Nazi dictator Adolf Hitler.
A national referendum held 19 August 1934 confirmed Hitler as sole Führer (leader) of Germany.

Führerprinzip

Führer principleleadership principleleader principle
Nazi Germany cultivated the Führerprinzip ("leader principle"), and Hitler was generally known as just der Führer ("the Leader").
The supreme leader, Adolf Hitler, answered to God and the German people.

Nazi Party

NSDAPNazisNazi
Führer was the title demanded by Adolf Hitler to denote his function as the head of the Nazi Party; he received it in 1921 when, infuriated over party founder Anton Drexler's plan to merge with another antisemitic far-right nationalist party, he resigned from the party.
Hitler soon acquired the title Führer ("leader") and after a series of sharp internal conflicts it was accepted that the party would be governed by the Führerprinzip ("leader principle").

Paul von Hindenburg

HindenburgPresident Hindenburgvon Hindenburg
After Hitler's appointment as Reichskanzler (Chancellor of the Reich), Hitler had Reichspräsident Paul von Hindenburg sign the Reichstag Fire Decree under the pretense of a purported Communist uprising.
Hindenburg died the following year, after which Hitler declared himself Führer und Reichskanzler, or Supreme Leader and Chancellor, which superseded both the President and Chancellor.

President of Germany (1919–1945)

PresidentPresident of GermanyReichspräsident
After Hitler's appointment as Reichskanzler (Chancellor of the Reich), Hitler had Reichspräsident Paul von Hindenburg sign the Reichstag Fire Decree under the pretense of a purported Communist uprising.
In 1934, after the death of President Hindenburg, Adolf Hitler, already Chancellor, assumed the Presidency, but did not usually use the title of President – ostensibly out of respect for Hindenburg – and preferred to rule as Führer und Reichskanzler ("Leader and Reich Chancellor"), highlighting the positions he already held in party and government.

Vidkun Quisling

QuislingQuisling, Vidkunfører
The word Führer has cognates in the Scandinavian languages, spelled fører in Danish and Norwegian which have the same meaning and use as the German word, but without necessarily having political connotations.
Meanwhile, he and Prytz founded a new political movement, Nordisk folkereisning i Norge, or "Nordic popular rising in Norway," with a central committee of 31 and Quisling as its fører – a one-man executive committee – though Quisling seemed to have had no particular attachment to the term.

1934 German referendum

plebiscitereferenduma plebiscite for August 19
Though this law was in breach of the Enabling Act, which specifically precluded any laws concerning the Presidential office, it was approved by a referendum on 19 August.
In fact, he had assumed these offices and powers immediately upon von Hindenburg's death and used the referendum to legitimize this move, taking the title Führer und Reichskanzler (Führer and Chancellor).

Greater Germanic Reich

Greater GermanyNazi EmpireGreater German Reich
This was done to emphasize Hitler's professed leadership of what the Nazis described as the "Nordic-Germanic master race", which was considered to include peoples such as the Norwegians, Danes, Swedes, Dutch, and others in addition to the Germans, and the intent to annex these countries to the German Reich in 1933.
On the very first page of Mein Kampf, Hitler openly declared his belief that "common blood belongs in a common Reich", elucidating the notion that the innate quality of race (as the Nazi movement perceived it) should hold precedence over "artificial" concepts such as national identity (including regional German identities such as Prussian and Bavarian) as the deciding factor for which people were "worthy" of being assimilated into a Greater German racial state (Ein Volk, Ein Reich, Ein Führer).

Anton Drexler

DREXLER, Anton
Führer was the title demanded by Adolf Hitler to denote his function as the head of the Nazi Party; he received it in 1921 when, infuriated over party founder Anton Drexler's plan to merge with another antisemitic far-right nationalist party, he resigned from the party.

Chancellor of Germany

ChancellorGerman ChancellorReichskanzler
After Hitler's appointment as Reichskanzler (Chancellor of the Reich), Hitler had Reichspräsident Paul von Hindenburg sign the Reichstag Fire Decree under the pretense of a purported Communist uprising.
Although the offices were merged, Hitler continued to be addressed as "Führer und Reichskanzler" indicating that the head of state and head of government were still separate positions, albeit held by the same man.

Rudolf Hess

Deputy FührerRudolf HeßHess
Appointed Deputy Führer to Adolf Hitler in 1933, Hess served in that position until 1941, when he flew solo to Scotland in an attempt to negotiate peace with the United Kingdom during World War II.

Führermuseum

Sonderauftrag LinzFuhrermuseumFuhrer Museum
The Führermuseum (English, Leader's Museum), also referred to as the Linz art gallery, was an unrealized art museum within a cultural complex planned by Adolf Hitler for his hometown, the Austrian city of Linz, near his birthplace of Braunau.

Volk

folkPeopleVolk (German word)
One of the Nazis' most-repeated political slogans was Ein Volk, ein Reich, ein Führer – "One People, One Empire, One Leader".
Also the political slogan Ein Volk, ein Reich, ein Führer ("One nation or race, one realm, one leader"); the compound word Herrenvolk, translated as "master race"; and the term Volksgemeinschaft, translated as "people's community".

Führer Headquarters

FührerhauptquartierFührer'' HeadquarterFührer'' Headquarters
At the beginning of World War II there were no permanent headquarters constructed for the German supreme leader, the Führer.

Caudillo

caudilloscaudillismocaudillism
However, Spain's General Francisco Franco (1936–1975) proudly took the title as his own during and after his military overthrow of the Second Spanish Republic in the Spanish Civil War (1936–39), in parallel to the German and Italian equivalents of the same period: Führer and Duce.

Conducător

ConducatorRulerthe ruler
Its meaning also parallels other titles, such as Führer in Nazi Germany, Duce in Fascist Italy and caudillo in Francoist Spain.

Duce

Il DuceDuce of FascismDux
This position was the model which other fascist leaders adopted, such as the position of Führer by Adolf Hitler and Caudillo by Francisco Franco.

Vozhd

In German language is a counterpart of Führer.

President for life

president-for-lifeGovernor-General for Lifelifetime presidency
On Hindenburg's death the German Reichstag voted to (unconstitutionally) merge the offices of President and Chancellor, giving Hitler the title of Führer.

Poglavnik

Leader of CroatiaPoglavnik of the Independent State of CroatiaLeader
The title is therefore usually compared and considered equivalent to other titles of ethno-political leadership used at the time such as Führer (used by Adolf Hitler, which was itself modeled after Benito Mussolini's title Duce).

Diaeresis (diacritic)

diaeresisumlauttrema
Führer (, spelled Fuehrer when the umlaut is not available) is a German word meaning "leader" or "guide".

Leadership

leaderleadersLeader of the
Führer (, spelled Fuehrer when the umlaut is not available) is a German word meaning "leader" or "guide".

Guide

Guidesguidancewilderness guide
Führer (, spelled Fuehrer when the umlaut is not available) is a German word meaning "leader" or "guide".