F. Scott Fitzgerald

FitzgeraldF. ScottScott FitzgeraldScottF Scott Fitzgerald F. Scott Fitzgerald’s[F.] Scott FitzgeraldF. Scott Fitzgerald,F. Scott Fitzgerald’sFitzgerald, F. Scott
Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald (September 24, 1896 – December 21, 1940) was an American fiction writer, whose works helped to illustrate the flamboyance and excess of the Jazz Age.wikipedia
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The Great Gatsby

Gatsbynovelnovel of the same name
He finished four novels: This Side of Paradise, The Beautiful and Damned, The Great Gatsby, and Tender Is the Night. She would become his inspiration for the character of Isabelle Borgé, Amory Blaine's first love in This Side of Paradise, for Daisy in The Great Gatsby, and several other characters in his novels and short stories.
The Great Gatsby is a 1925 novel written by American author F. Scott Fitzgerald that follows a cast of characters living in the fictional towns of West Egg and East Egg on prosperous Long Island in the summer of 1922.

Tender Is the Night

novel of the same name
He finished four novels: This Side of Paradise, The Beautiful and Damned, The Great Gatsby, and Tender Is the Night.
Tender Is the Night is the fourth and final novel completed by American writer F. Scott Fitzgerald.

American literature

American authorAmerican writerAmerican
Perhaps the most notable member of the "Lost Generation" of the 1920s, Fitzgerald is now widely regarded as one of the greatest American writers of the 20th century.
The short stories and novels of F. Scott Fitzgerald captured the mood of the 1920s, and John Dos Passos wrote too about the war.

Lost Generation

The Lost GenerationAmerican expatriate communityentire generation
Perhaps the most notable member of the "Lost Generation" of the 1920s, Fitzgerald is now widely regarded as one of the greatest American writers of the 20th century.
Both Hemingway and Fitzgerald touched on this theme throughout the novels The Sun Also Rises and The Great Gatsby.

The Beautiful and Damned

second novelThe Beautiful and the Damned
He finished four novels: This Side of Paradise, The Beautiful and Damned, The Great Gatsby, and Tender Is the Night.
The Beautiful and Damned, first published by Scribner's in 1922, is F. Scott Fitzgerald's second novel.

Jazz Age

classic jazzJazz-ageThe Jazz Age
Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald (September 24, 1896 – December 21, 1940) was an American fiction writer, whose works helped to illustrate the flamboyance and excess of the Jazz Age.
American author F. Scott Fitzgerald is widely credited with coining the term, first using it in the title of his 1922 short story collection, Tales of the Jazz Age.

Edmund Wilson

Wilson, EdmundEdmund and Elena Wilson
He firmly dedicated himself at Princeton to honing his craft as a writer, and became friends with future critics and writers Edmund Wilson and John Peale Bishop.
He influenced many American authors, including F. Scott Fitzgerald, whose unfinished work he edited for publication.

Princeton Triangle Club

Triangle ClubThe Triangle Club
He wrote for the Princeton Triangle Club, the Nassau Lit, and the Princeton Tiger.
Among the club's notable alumni are F. Scott Fitzgerald, Booth Tarkington, Russel Wright, Joshua Logan, Brooks Bowman, Jimmy Stewart, José Ferrer, Wayne Rogers, Clark Gesner, Jeff Moss, David E. Kelley, Nicholas Hammond, Zachary Pincus-Roth, and Brooke Shields.

Charles Scribner's Sons

ScribnerScribnersScribner, London
His absorption in the Triangle—a kind of musical-comedy society—led to his submission of a novel to Charles Scribner's Sons where the editor praised the writing but ultimately rejected the book.
Charles Scribner's Sons, or simply Scribner's or Scribner, is an American publisher based in New York City, known for publishing American authors including Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Kurt Vonnegut, Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings, Stephen King, Robert A. Heinlein, Thomas Wolfe, George Santayana, John Clellon Holmes, Don DeLillo, and Edith Wharton.

Daisy Buchanan

DaisyDaisy Fay
She would become his inspiration for the character of Isabelle Borgé, Amory Blaine's first love in This Side of Paradise, for Daisy in The Great Gatsby, and several other characters in his novels and short stories.
Daisy Fay Buchanan is a fictional character in F. Scott Fitzgerald's magnum opus The Great Gatsby (1925).

This Side of Paradise

Isabelle BorgéThis Side of Parody
He finished four novels: This Side of Paradise, The Beautiful and Damned, The Great Gatsby, and Tender Is the Night. She would become his inspiration for the character of Isabelle Borgé, Amory Blaine's first love in This Side of Paradise, for Daisy in The Great Gatsby, and several other characters in his novels and short stories.
This Side of Paradise is the debut novel by F. Scott Fitzgerald.

Frances Scott Fitzgerald

Frances "Scottie" FitzgeraldFrances Scott "Scottie" FitzgeraldScottie
Their daughter and only child, Frances Scott "Scottie" Fitzgerald, was born on October 26, 1921.
Frances Scott "Scottie" Fitzgerald (October 26, 1921 – June 18, 1986) was the only child of novelist F. Scott Fitzgerald and Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald.

Ginevra King

It was while attending Princeton that Fitzgerald met Chicago socialite and debutante Ginevra King on a visit back home in St. Paul.
Ginevra King (November 30, 1898 – December 13, 1980) was an American socialite and debutante and was the inspiration for several characters in the novels and short stories of American novelist F. Scott Fitzgerald.

Maxwell Perkins

Max PerkinsPerkinsMaxwell E. Perkins
(The Great Gatsby, now considered to be his masterpiece, did not become popular until after Fitzgerald's death.) Because of this lifestyle, as well as the bills from Zelda's medical care when they came, Fitzgerald was constantly in financial trouble and often required loans from his literary agent, Harold Ober, and his editor at Scribner's, Maxwell Perkins.
William Maxwell Evarts "Max" Perkins (September 20, 1884 – June 17, 1947), was an American book editor, best remembered for discovering authors Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald and Thomas Wolfe.

John Peale Bishop

He firmly dedicated himself at Princeton to honing his craft as a writer, and became friends with future critics and writers Edmund Wilson and John Peale Bishop.
He entered Princeton University in 1913, at age 21, where he became friends with Edmund Wilson and F. Scott Fitzgerald.

A Moveable Feast

Hemingway did not get on well with Zelda, however, and in addition to describing her as "insane" in his memoir A Moveable Feast, Hemingway claimed that Zelda "encouraged her husband to drink so as to distract Fitzgerald from his work on his novel", so he could work on the short stories he sold to magazines to help support their lifestyle.
Among other notable persons, people featured in the book include: Sylvia Beach, Hilaire Belloc, Aleister Crowley, John Dos Passos, F. Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald, Ford Madox Ford, James Joyce, Wyndham Lewis, Pascin, Ezra Pound, Evan Shipman, Gertrude Stein, Alice B. Toklas and Hermann von Wedderkop.

Esquire (magazine)

EsquireEsquire MagazineEsquire'' magazine
Like most professional authors at the time, Fitzgerald supplemented his income by writing short stories for such magazines as The Saturday Evening Post, Collier's Weekly, and Esquire, and sold his stories and novels to Hollywood studios.
It later transformed itself into a more refined periodical with an emphasis on men's fashion and contributions by Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Alberto Moravia, André Gide, and Julian Huxley.

The Last Tycoon

Monroe StahrThe Love of the Last Tycoon
A fifth, unfinished novel, The Last Tycoon, was published posthumously.
The Last Tycoon is an unfinished novel by F. Scott Fitzgerald.

Princeton Tiger Magazine

The TigerPrinceton TigerThe Princeton Tiger
He wrote for the Princeton Triangle Club, the Nassau Lit, and the Princeton Tiger.
F. Scott Fitzgerald

Nardin Academy

His parents, both Catholic, sent Fitzgerald to two Catholic schools on the West Side of Buffalo, first Holy Angels Convent (1903–1904, now disused) and then Nardin Academy (1905–1908).
F. Scott Fitzgerald, author, attended the elementary school for a short period of time

Sheilah Graham

The Sheilah Graham Show
He also began a high-profile live-in affair with movie columnist Sheilah Graham.
Graham also was known for her relationship with F. Scott Fitzgerald, a relationship she played a significant role in immortalizing through the autobiographical Beloved Infidel, a bestseller that was made into a film.

The Pat Hobby Stories

Pat HobbyPat Hobby Teamed with Geniusseries of stories
From 1939 until his death in 1940, Fitzgerald mocked himself as a Hollywood hack through the character of Pat Hobby in a sequence of 17 short stories, later collected as "The Pat Hobby Stories", which garnered many positive reviews.
The Pat Hobby Stories are a collection of 17 short stories written by F. Scott Fitzgerald, first published by Arnold Gingrich of Esquire magazine between January 1940 and May 1941, and later collected in one volume in 1962.

Save Me the Waltz

When Zelda wrote and sent to Scribner's her own fictional version of their lives in Europe, Save Me the Waltz, Fitzgerald was angry and was able to make some changes prior to the novel's publication, and convince her doctors to keep her from writing any more about what he called his "material", which included their relationship.
Published in 1932, it is a semi-autobiographical account of her life and marriage to F. Scott Fitzgerald.

Richard H. Hoffmann

Richard Hoffmann
During his work on Winter Carnival, Fitzgerald went on an alcoholic binge and was treated by New York psychiatrist Richard H. Hoffmann.
Among his more famous patients was F. Scott Fitzgerald.

Princeton University

PrincetonCollege of New JerseyPrinceton College
After graduating from the Newman School in 1913, Fitzgerald decided to stay in New Jersey to continue his artistic development at Princeton University.
Its collections include the autographed manuscript of F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby and George F. Kennan's Long Telegram.