FIDE

World Chess FederationFédération Internationale des ÉchecsAgonInternational Chess FederationFIDE DesignationACFFIDÉFédération internationale des échecs or World Chess FederationInternational Masterthe World Chess Federation
The Fédération Internationale des Échecs or World Chess Federation is an international organization that connects the various national chess federations around the world and acts as the governing body of international chess competition.wikipedia
1,154 Related Articles

Chess

chess playerchess gamewestern chess
The Fédération Internationale des Échecs or World Chess Federation is an international organization that connects the various national chess federations around the world and acts as the governing body of international chess competition.
Since 1948, the World Championship has been regulated by the Fédération Internationale des Échecs (FIDE), the game's international governing body.

World Junior Chess Championship

World Junior ChampionshipWorld Junior ChampionWorld Junior Champions
FIDE's most visible activity is organizing the World Chess Championship (overall and for special groups such as women, juniors, seniors, and the disabled), and most particularly the Chess Olympiad and World Team Championship for national teams.
The World Junior Chess Championship is an under-20 chess tournament (players must have been under 20 years old on 1 January in the year of competition) organized by the World Chess Federation (FIDE).

Women's World Chess Championship

Women's World Chess ChampionWomen's World ChampionshipWomen's World Champion
FIDE's most visible activity is organizing the World Chess Championship (overall and for special groups such as women, juniors, seniors, and the disabled), and most particularly the Chess Olympiad and World Team Championship for national teams.
Like the World Chess Championship, it is administered by FIDE.

World Chess Championship

World ChampionWorld Chess ChampionWorld Championship
FIDE's most visible activity is organizing the World Chess Championship (overall and for special groups such as women, juniors, seniors, and the disabled), and most particularly the Chess Olympiad and World Team Championship for national teams.
From 1948 to 1993, the championship was administered by FIDE, the World Chess Federation.

Chess Olympiad

OlympiadOlympiadsWomen's Chess Olympiads
FIDE's most visible activity is organizing the World Chess Championship (overall and for special groups such as women, juniors, seniors, and the disabled), and most particularly the Chess Olympiad and World Team Championship for national teams.
FIDE organises the tournament and selects the host nation.

World Senior Chess Championship

World Senior ChampionshipWorld Senior ChampionWomen's World Senior Championship
FIDE's most visible activity is organizing the World Chess Championship (overall and for special groups such as women, juniors, seniors, and the disabled), and most particularly the Chess Olympiad and World Team Championship for national teams.
The World Senior Chess Championship is an annual chess tournament established in 1991 by FIDE, the World Chess Federation.

Rules of chess

chessrulesstandard chess
It defines the rules of chess, both for playing individual games (i.e. the board and moves) and for the conduct of international competitions.
Today, the standard rules are set by FIDE (Fédération Internationale des Échecs), the international governing body for chess.

International Arbiter

arbiterArbiterschess arbiter
FIDE awards a number of organizational titles, including International Arbiter, which signifies that the recipient is competent and trusted to oversee top-class competitions.
In chess, International Arbiter is a title awarded by FIDE to individuals deemed capable of acting as arbiter in important chess matches.

Arkady Dvorkovich

Assistant to the President of the Russian Federation Arkady Vladimirovich Dvorkovich
Since October 3, 2018 FIDE's president is Arkady Dvorkovich.
Dvorkovich is an official of the Russian Chess Federation and was elected president of FIDE in October 2018, succeeding Kirsan Ilyumzhinov.

Elo rating system

ratingElo ratingElo
FIDE calculates the Elo ratings of players and uses these as the basis on which it awards titles for achievement in competitive play: FIDE Master, International Master, International Grandmaster, and women's versions of those titles.
Elo's system was adopted by the World Chess Federation (FIDE) in 1970.

FIDE Album

It also awards Master and Grandmaster titles for achievement in problem and study composing and solving, and periodically publishes FIDE Albums of the best problems.
The FIDE Albums are publications of the world chess governing body, FIDE, via the Permanent Commission of the FIDE for Chess Compositions (PCCC), containing the best chess problems and studies of a certain period (usually three years in length).

Correspondence chess

correspondencecorrespondence gamescorrespondence game
Correspondence chess (chess played by post or email) is regulated by the International Correspondence Chess Federation, an independent body that cooperates with FIDE where appropriate.
Correspondence chess tournaments are usually played under the auspices of an official regulatory body, most importantly the International Correspondence Chess Federation (ICCF), which is affiliated with FIDE, the international chess organization.

Max Euwe

EuweEuwe, Max
In 1928 FIDE recognized Bogoljubow as "Champion of FIDE" after he won a match against Max Euwe.
Euwe served as President of FIDE, the World Chess Federation, from 1970 to 1978.

Royal Dutch Chess Federation

While they were debating procedures in 1937 and Alekhine and Euwe were preparing for their re-match later that year, the Dutch Chess Federation proposed that a super-tournament (AVRO) of ex-champions and rising stars should be held to select the next challenger.
It is affiliated with the World Chess Federation.

Géza Maróczy

MaróczyMaróczy, Géza
Alekhine, Bogoljubow, Maróczy, Réti, Rubinstein, Tartakower and Vidmar promptly signed them.
In 1950, FIDE instituted the title of Grandmaster; Maróczy was one of several players who were awarded the title based on their past achievements.

Candidates Tournament

CandidatesCandidateCandidates matches
The proposals which led to the 1948 Championship Tournament also specified the procedure by which challengers for the World Championship would be selected in a three-year cycle: countries affiliated with FIDE would send players to Zonal tournaments (the number varied depending on the number of strong players each country had); the players who gained the top places in these would compete in an Interzonal tournament (later split into two, then three tournaments as the number of countries and eligible players increased ); the highest-placed players from the Interzonal would compete in the Candidates Tournament, along with the loser of the previous title match and the runner-up in the previous Candidates Tournament; and the winner of the Candidates played a title match against the champion. FIDE found itself embroiled in some controversies relating to the American player Bobby Fischer, the first of which took place when Fischer alleged that at the 1962 Candidates Tournament in Curaçao, the Soviet players Tigran Petrosian, Paul Keres and Efim Geller had pre-arranged draws in their games played amongst themselves, and that Viktor Korchnoi, another Soviet player, had been instructed to lose to them (Fischer had placed 4th, well behind Petrosian, Keres and Geller).
The Candidates Tournament is a chess tournament organized by FIDE, chess's international governing body, since 1950, as the final contest to determine the challenger for the World Chess Championship.

World Chess Championship 1948

1948 World Chess Championship19481948 Championship Tournament
The 1938 AVRO tournament was used as the basis for the 1948 Championship Tournament.
The tournament marked the passing of control of the championship title to FIDE, the International Chess Federation which had been formed in 1924.

Bobby Fischer

FischerRobert FischerBobby Fisher
FIDE found itself embroiled in some controversies relating to the American player Bobby Fischer, the first of which took place when Fischer alleged that at the 1962 Candidates Tournament in Curaçao, the Soviet players Tigran Petrosian, Paul Keres and Efim Geller had pre-arranged draws in their games played amongst themselves, and that Viktor Korchnoi, another Soviet player, had been instructed to lose to them (Fischer had placed 4th, well behind Petrosian, Keres and Geller).
In 1975, Fischer refused to defend his title when an agreement could not be reached with FIDE, chess's international governing body, over one of the conditions for the match.

Paul Keres

Keres
FIDE found itself embroiled in some controversies relating to the American player Bobby Fischer, the first of which took place when Fischer alleged that at the 1962 Candidates Tournament in Curaçao, the Soviet players Tigran Petrosian, Paul Keres and Efim Geller had pre-arranged draws in their games played amongst themselves, and that Viktor Korchnoi, another Soviet player, had been instructed to lose to them (Fischer had placed 4th, well behind Petrosian, Keres and Geller). While this confusion went unresolved: Euwe lost his title to Alekhine; the AVRO tournament in 1938 was won by Paul Keres under a tie-breaking rule, with Reuben Fine placed second and Capablanca and Flohr in the bottom places; and the outbreak of World War II in 1939 cut short the controversy.
Keres, in his autobiographical games collection, refers to this major event as a 'Candidates' Tournament', and claimed that he was recognized as a Grandmaster after winning it, although its parallel connection with later FIDE-organized Candidates' tournaments (from 1950 onwards) is not exact, and the Grandmaster title was not formalized by FIDE until 1950.

AVRO 1938 chess tournament

1938 AVRO tournamentAVRO tournament1938 '''AVRO''' Tournament
The 1938 AVRO tournament was used as the basis for the 1948 Championship Tournament. While this confusion went unresolved: Euwe lost his title to Alekhine; the AVRO tournament in 1938 was won by Paul Keres under a tie-breaking rule, with Reuben Fine placed second and Capablanca and Flohr in the bottom places; and the outbreak of World War II in 1939 cut short the controversy.
However, when FIDE organised its 1948 match tournament for the world title after Alekhine's death in 1946, it invited the six surviving AVRO participants (Capablanca had also died), except Flohr who was replaced by Vasily Smyslov.

Interzonal

ZonalZonal tournamentInterzonal Tournament
Since that event was being treated as a Zonal tournament, Fischer forfeited his right to compete for the right to challenge World Champion Boris Spassky in 1972.
Interzonal chess tournaments were tournaments organized by the World Chess Federation FIDE from the 1950s to the 1990s.

World Chess Championship 1963

Stockholm Interzonal1963 World Championship1962
FIDE found itself embroiled in some controversies relating to the American player Bobby Fischer, the first of which took place when Fischer alleged that at the 1962 Candidates Tournament in Curaçao, the Soviet players Tigran Petrosian, Paul Keres and Efim Geller had pre-arranged draws in their games played amongst themselves, and that Viktor Korchnoi, another Soviet player, had been instructed to lose to them (Fischer had placed 4th, well behind Petrosian, Keres and Geller).
The cycle is particularly remembered for the controversy surrounding the Candidates' Tournament at Curaçao in 1962, which resulted in FIDE changing the format of the Candidates Tournament to a series of knockout matches.

Interregnum of World Chess Champions

interregnumInterregnum periodsleaving the title vacant
Alexander Alekhine's death created an interregnum that made the normal procedure impossible.
FIDE, the international chess federation, found it very difficult to organize the early discussions on how to resolve the interregnum because problems with money and travel so soon after the end of World War II prevented many countries from sending representatives – most notably the Soviet Union.

Anatoly Karpov

KarpovKarpov, Anatoly
While this dispute was going on, Anatoly Karpov won the right to challenge in 1975.
He played three matches against Kasparov for the title from 1986 to 1990, before becoming FIDE World Champion once again after Kasparov broke away from FIDE in 1993.

Alexander Alekhine

AlekhineAlekhine, AlexanderAljechin
Alekhine, Bogoljubow, Maróczy, Réti, Rubinstein, Tartakower and Vidmar promptly signed them. Alexander Alekhine's death created an interregnum that made the normal procedure impossible.
Alekhine's burial was sponsored by FIDE, and the remains were transferred to the Cimetière du Montparnasse, Paris, France, in 1956.