FIFA Women's World Cup

World CupWomen's World CupWorld CupsFIFA World CupWomen's World CupsFIFA World CupsFIFA Women's World Cup AwardsWomen2007 World Cup2019
The FIFA Women's World Cup is an international football competition contested by the senior women's national teams of the members of Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the sport's international governing body.wikipedia
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1991 FIFA Women's World Cup

1991Women's World Cup1991 World Cup
The competition has been held every four years since 1991, when the inaugural tournament, then called the FIFA Women's World Championship, was held in China.
The 1991 FIFA Women's World Cup was the inaugural FIFA Women's World Cup, the world championship for women's national association football teams.

United States women's national soccer team

United StatesUnited States women's national teamUSA
The United States has won four times, and is the current champion after winning it at the 2019 tournament in France.
The team is the most successful in international women's soccer, winning four Women's World Cup titles (including the first Women's World Cup in 1991), four Olympic gold medals (including the first Olympic women's soccer tournament in 1996), and eight CONCACAF Gold Cups.

2019 FIFA Women's World Cup

20192019 Women's World Cup2019 World Cup
The United States has won four times, and is the current champion after winning it at the 2019 tournament in France.
The 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup was the eighth edition of the FIFA Women's World Cup, the quadrennial international football championship contested by 24 women's national teams representing member associations of FIFA.

FIFA

Fédération Internationale de Football AssociationFIFA XIFIFA.com
The FIFA Women's World Cup is an international football competition contested by the senior women's national teams of the members of Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the sport's international governing body.
FIFA is responsible for the organization and promotion of football's major international tournaments, notably the World Cup which commenced in 1930 and the Women's World Cup which commenced in 1991.

Germany women's national football team

GermanyGerman national teamWest Germany
The other winners are Germany, with two titles, and Japan and Norway with one title each.
They are two-time world champions, having won the 2003 and 2007 tournaments.

FIFA Women's World Cup qualification

qualification phaseFIFA Women's World CupFIFA Women's World Cup qualifier
Under the tournament's current format, national teams vie for 23 slots in a three-year qualification phase.
FIFA Women's World Cup qualification is the process a national women's association football team goes through to qualify for the FIFA Women's World Cup.

Japan women's national football team

JapanJapan national teamJapan women's national team
The other winners are Germany, with two titles, and Japan and Norway with one title each. During the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup, both Formiga of Brazil and Homare Sawa of Japan appeared in their record sixth World Cup, a feat that had never been achieved before by either female or male players.
Nadeshiko Japan defeated the United States in the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup Final, thus claiming their first FIFA Women's World Cup title, becoming the first Asian team to do so and only the fourth women's world champions.

Mexico women's national football team

MexicoMexico women's national teamMexico national team
This was followed by another unofficial tournament the following year in Mexico, where Denmark won the title after defeating Mexico in the final.
Coached by Leonardo Cuéllar for most of the team's official existence, La Tri's senior squad has participated in three Women's World Cups and one edition of the Summer Olympic Games.

England women's national football team

EnglandEngland national teamEngland women
In the mid-1980s, the Mundialito was held in Italy across four editions with both Italy and England winning two titles.
England have qualified for the FIFA Women's World Cup five times, reaching the quarter-finals on three occasions; in 1995, 2007, and 2011, finishing third in 2015 and fourth in 2019.

Italy women's national football team

ItalyItalian national teamItaly women's national team
In the mid-1980s, the Mundialito was held in Italy across four editions with both Italy and England winning two titles.
While Italy were runners-up in the European Championship in 1993 and 1997, they are yet to replicate similar success at the World Cup.

1988 FIFA Women's Invitation Tournament

FIFA's Women's Invitation Tournament in China in 1988invitational1988 International Women's Football Tournament
This came in 1988 in the form of an invitational tournament in China as a test to see if a global women's World Cup was feasible.
The competition was a success and on 30 June FIFA approved the establishment of an official World Cup for 1991, which would also be held in China.

CONCACAF

North AmericaConfederation of North, Central American and Caribbean Association FootballCONCACAF (North, Central America & Caribbean)
Twelve national teams took part in the competition – four from UEFA, three from AFC, two from CONCACAF, and one each from CONMEBOL, CAF and OFC.
CONCACAF's primary functions are to organize competitions for national teams and clubs, and to conduct World Cup and Women's World Cup qualifying tournaments.

China women's national football team

ChinaChina PRChinese women's national team
After the opening match of the tournament between China and Canada was attended by 45,000 people, the tournament was deemed a success, with crowds averaging 20,000. Norway, who was the European champion, defeated Sweden, 1–0, in the final, while Brazil clinched third place by beating the hosts in a penalty shootout. In the 1999 edition, one of the most famous moments of the tournament was American defender Brandi Chastain's victory celebration after scoring the Cup-winning penalty kick against China.
Held annually in the Algarve region of Portugal since 1994, it is one of the most prestigious women's football events, alongside the Women's World Cup and Women's Olympic Football.

CONMEBOL

South AmericaCONMEBOL (South America)Confederación Sudamericana de Fútbol
Twelve national teams took part in the competition – four from UEFA, three from AFC, two from CONCACAF, and one each from CONMEBOL, CAF and OFC.
Currently, the Confederation is planning to create the first women's qualification to the FIFA Women's World Cup to replace the Copa América Femenina.

Brazil women's national football team

BrazilBrazilian national teamBrazil national team
Norway, who was the European champion, defeated Sweden, 1–0, in the final, while Brazil clinched third place by beating the hosts in a penalty shootout. During the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup, both Formiga of Brazil and Homare Sawa of Japan appeared in their record sixth World Cup, a feat that had never been achieved before by either female or male players.
It has participated in eight editions of the FIFA Women's World Cup, finishing as runner-up in 2007, and seven editions of the Copa América Femenina.

1995 FIFA Women's World Cup

19951995 World CupSweden 1995
The 1995 edition in Sweden saw the experiment of a time-out concept throughout the tournament which was later tightened mid-tournament to only occur after a break in play.
The 1995 FIFA Women's World Cup, the second edition of the FIFA Women's World Cup, was held in Sweden and won by Norway.

Brandi Chastain

Chastain
In the 1999 edition, one of the most famous moments of the tournament was American defender Brandi Chastain's victory celebration after scoring the Cup-winning penalty kick against China.
Brandi Denise Chastain (born July 21, 1968) is an American retired soccer player, two-time FIFA Women's World Cup champion, two-time Olympic gold-medalist, coach, and sports broadcaster.

2003 FIFA Women's World Cup

20032003 World Cup2003 Women's World Cup
The 1999 and 2003 Women's World Cups were both held in the United States; in 2003 China was supposed to host it, but the tournament was moved because of SARS.
The 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup was the fourth edition of the FIFA Women's World Cup, the quadrennial championship of women's association football teams organized by FIFA.

2007 FIFA Women's World Cup

20072007 World Cup2007 Women's World Cup
As compensation, China retained its automatic qualification to the 2003 tournament as host nation, and was automatically chosen to host the 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup.
The 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup, the fifth edition of the FIFA Women's World Cup, was an international association football competition for women held in China from 10 to 30 September 2007.

2011 FIFA Women's World Cup

20112011 World Cup2011 FIFA World Cup
Germany hosted the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup, as decided by vote in October 2007.
The 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup was the sixth FIFA Women's World Cup competition, the world championship for women's national association football teams.

Mundialito (women)

Mundialito1981 Mundialito1988 Mundialito
In the mid-1980s, the Mundialito was held in Italy across four editions with both Italy and England winning two titles.
Held on four occasions in the northern region of Italy since 1984, it was one of the most prestigious women's football events, prior to the advent of the Women's World Cup and Women's Olympic Football.

2015 FIFA Women's World Cup

20152015 FIFA World Cup2015 World Cup
In March 2011, FIFA awarded Canada the right to host the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup. During the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup, both Formiga of Brazil and Homare Sawa of Japan appeared in their record sixth World Cup, a feat that had never been achieved before by either female or male players.
The 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup was the seventh FIFA Women's World Cup, the quadrennial international women's football world championship tournament.

Norway women's national football team

NorwayNorway national teamNorwegian national team
The other winners are Germany, with two titles, and Japan and Norway with one title each. Norway, who was the European champion, defeated Sweden, 1–0, in the final, while Brazil clinched third place by beating the hosts in a penalty shootout.
Held annually in the Algarve region of Portugal since 1994, it is one of the most prestigious women's football events, alongside the Women's World Cup and Women's Olympic Football.

Confederation of African Football

CAFCAF (Africa)Africa
Twelve national teams took part in the competition – four from UEFA, three from AFC, two from CONCACAF, and one each from CONMEBOL, CAF and OFC.
The following CAF members have competed in the following FIFA Women's World Cups.

Formiga (footballer, born 1978)

FormigaMiraildes MotaMiraildes Maciel Mota
During the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup, both Formiga of Brazil and Homare Sawa of Japan appeared in their record sixth World Cup, a feat that had never been achieved before by either female or male players.
Formiga holds many international records as a member of the Brazil women's national football team, being the only player present in all Olympic Games tournaments of women's football since the first edition at the 1996 Summer Olympics, and a record for appearing at seven different FIFA Women's World Cup tournaments.