FTC v. Balls of Kryptonite

a 2011 casean enforcement action
FTC v. Balls of Kryptonite is an enforcement action brought in 2009 by the U.S.wikipedia
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Office of Fair Trading

OFTOffice of Fair Trading (OFT)Fair Trading
Complaints to the U.K.'s Office of Fair Trading (OFT) led to the FTC's enforcement action.
In 2009, after customers complained to OFT about deceptive practices by two websites operated by a man in the state of California that misrepresented themselves as being British, it coordinated actions with the U.S. Federal Trade Commission, which began an enforcement action.

International Safe Harbor Privacy Principles

Safe HarborSafe Harbor PrinciplesSafe Harbor arrangement
It was the first time the FTC had brought an action against an American company that did business exclusively abroad, its first action enforcing the U.S./EU Safe Harbor Privacy Program and one of the first uses of its expanded ability to coordinate its efforts with foreign counterparts under the SAFE WEB Act Congress had passed several years earlier.
In a 2011 case, the Federal Trade Commission obtained a consent decree from a California-based online retailer that had sold exclusively to customers in the United Kingdom.

Federal Trade Commission

FTCU.S. Federal Trade CommissionUnited States Federal Trade Commission
FTC v. Balls of Kryptonite is an enforcement action brought in 2009 by the U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC) in United States District Court for the Central District of California.

United States District Court for the Central District of California

Central District of CaliforniaC.D. Cal.U.S. District Court for the Central District of California
FTC v. Balls of Kryptonite is an enforcement action brought in 2009 by the U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC) in United States District Court for the Central District of California.

Southern California

southernSoCalCalifornia
The defendant was Jaivin Karnani, a Southern California man, his company Balls of Kryptonite LLC, and several other corporate names they did business as.

Trade name

doing business asd/b/aDBA
The defendant was Jaivin Karnani, a Southern California man, his company Balls of Kryptonite LLC, and several other corporate names they did business as.

Court order

orderorderscourt ruling
In 2011 the FTC secured a court order barring Karnani and Balls of Kryptonite from engaging in many of the deceptive business practices that had brought him to the agency's attention.

Consumer electronics

consumer electronicelectronicsbrown goods
For several years before the FTC brought its case, Karnani had been selling consumer electronic devices such as cameras, video game systems and computer software to customers in the United Kingdom. He then registered websites in their names with the .co.uk top-level domain, offering consumer electronics such as cameras, video game systems, and computer software.

United Kingdom

BritishUKBritain
For several years before the FTC brought its case, Karnani had been selling consumer electronic devices such as cameras, video game systems and computer software to customers in the United Kingdom.

Domain name

domaindomain namesdomains
Despite being physically located in California, he registered his websites in British domains, quoted prices in pounds sterling and took other steps to suggest that the business was physically located in the U.K. Customers who bought the merchandise at the prices quoted, usually significantly lower than other, established British retailers, found that delivery took in some cases far longer than the promised 48 hours even though their credit cards were charged immediately and they were told they could not cancel their orders.

Pound sterling

£GBPpounds
Despite being physically located in California, he registered his websites in British domains, quoted prices in pounds sterling and took other steps to suggest that the business was physically located in the U.K. Customers who bought the merchandise at the prices quoted, usually significantly lower than other, established British retailers, found that delivery took in some cases far longer than the promised 48 hours even though their credit cards were charged immediately and they were told they could not cancel their orders. Prices were given in pounds sterling—often considerably below those charged by other online retailers, such as £200 for a Panasonic Lumix camera or £115 for an eight-gigabyte Zune, a significant markdown from its official list price of £199.

Warranty

warrantiesbreach of warrantylifetime warranty
In many cases, the goods they received were inoperable since they had never been intended for sale in the British or European markets, and were thus not protected by warranty.

Dean Pregerson

Dean D. Pregerson
In response to its initial complaint Judge Dean D. Pregerson issued a temporary restraining order barring Karnani and his companies from misrepresenting their location on their websites along with the other practices customers had complained to OFT about.

Injunction

temporary restraining orderinjunctive reliefenjoin
In response to its initial complaint Judge Dean D. Pregerson issued a temporary restraining order barring Karnani and his companies from misrepresenting their location on their websites along with the other practices customers had complained to OFT about.

Superman

Kal-ElClark Kent / SupermanClark Kent
Some commentators, who thought the case title was humorous enough to make extended references to the Superman comics in their commentary, questioned whether the commission's action against a retailer who did not deceive any American consumers was a wise use of its limited resources, and whether it might have been better to prosecute him in Britain.

European Union

EUEuropeanEurope
Another, in the course of criticizing the failings of the European Union's Data Protection Directive when it came to dealing with cloud computing, did not criticize the enforcement action as such but showed that it pointed out how much more work needed to be done in ensuring compliance with the Safe Harbor Program.

Data Protection Directive

Directive 95/46/EC on the protection of personal dataDirective 95/46/ECEuropean Data Protection Directive
Another, in the course of criticizing the failings of the European Union's Data Protection Directive when it came to dealing with cloud computing, did not criticize the enforcement action as such but showed that it pointed out how much more work needed to be done in ensuring compliance with the Safe Harbor Program.

Cloud computing

cloudcloud-basedcloud services
Another, in the course of criticizing the failings of the European Union's Data Protection Directive when it came to dealing with cloud computing, did not criticize the enforcement action as such but showed that it pointed out how much more work needed to be done in ensuring compliance with the Safe Harbor Program.

Pasadena, California

PasadenaPasadena, CACity of Pasadena
In 2006, the FTC later alleged, Karnani, a resident of Pasadena, California, created two companies, Best Price Brands LLC and Bite Size Deals LLC.

Limited liability company

LLClimited liability companieslimited liability corporation
The defendant was Jaivin Karnani, a Southern California man, his company Balls of Kryptonite LLC, and several other corporate names they did business as. In 2006, the FTC later alleged, Karnani, a resident of Pasadena, California, created two companies, Best Price Brands LLC and Bite Size Deals LLC.

.uk

.co.uk.ac.ukac.uk
He then registered websites in their names with the .co.uk top-level domain, offering consumer electronics such as cameras, video game systems, and computer software.

Top-level domain

top level domainTLDtop-level domains
He then registered websites in their names with the .co.uk top-level domain, offering consumer electronics such as cameras, video game systems, and computer software.

Panasonic

MatsushitaPanasonic CorporationMatsushita Electric
Prices were given in pounds sterling—often considerably below those charged by other online retailers, such as £200 for a Panasonic Lumix camera or £115 for an eight-gigabyte Zune, a significant markdown from its official list price of £199.

Lumix

Panasonic LumixLumix LX2LX3
Prices were given in pounds sterling—often considerably below those charged by other online retailers, such as £200 for a Panasonic Lumix camera or £115 for an eight-gigabyte Zune, a significant markdown from its official list price of £199.

Gigabyte

GBgigabytesGiB
Prices were given in pounds sterling—often considerably below those charged by other online retailers, such as £200 for a Panasonic Lumix camera or £115 for an eight-gigabyte Zune, a significant markdown from its official list price of £199.