Fairchild C-119 Flying Boxcar

C-119Fairchild C-119G Flying BoxcarC-119 Flying BoxcarC-119G Flying BoxcarsC-119sFairchild C-119Fairchild C-119C Flying BoxcarR4Q Flying BoxcarC-119 PacketsC-119B
The Fairchild C-119 Flying Boxcar (Navy and Marine Corps designation R4Q) is an American military transport aircraft developed from the World War II-era Fairchild C-82 Packet, designed to carry cargo, personnel, litter patients, and mechanized equipment, and to drop cargo and troops by parachute.wikipedia
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Twin-boom aircraft

twin-boomtwin boomtwin booms
Its cargo-hauling ability and unusual twin-boom design earned it the nickname "Flying Boxcar".
Examples include the C-82 Packet, C-119 Flying Boxcar, Armstrong Whitworth AW.660 Argosy, IAI Arava and Transavia PL-12 Airtruk.

Tactical Air Command

TACAir Defense, Tactical Air CommandAir Defense – Tactical Air Command (ADTAC)
The Packet provided service to the Air Force's Tactical Air Command and Military Air Transport Service for nearly nine years during which time its design was found to have several serious problems.
314th Troop Carrier Wing (Medium) (C-119 Flying Boxcar)

Fairchild Aircraft

FairchildFairchild Engine and Airplane CorporationFairchild Republic
The Fairchild C-119 Flying Boxcar (Navy and Marine Corps designation R4Q) is an American military transport aircraft developed from the World War II-era Fairchild C-82 Packet, designed to carry cargo, personnel, litter patients, and mechanized equipment, and to drop cargo and troops by parachute.
The Fairchild C-119 Flying Boxcar was a US military transport aircraft developed from the World War II C-82 Packet.

Fairchild C-123 Provider

C-123C-123 ProviderFairchild C-123K Provider
No. 51-8098 to 51-8168) before converting the factory for a planned production of the Chase C-123 that never eventuated.
By 1953, Henry J. Kaiser purchased a majority share in Chase Aircraft, feeling that after having completed C-119s for Fairchild under contract, he could take control of the impending C-123 contract.

Fairchild C-82 Packet

C-82C-82 PacketFairchild C-82A-FA Packet
The Fairchild C-119 Flying Boxcar (Navy and Marine Corps designation R4Q) is an American military transport aircraft developed from the World War II-era Fairchild C-82 Packet, designed to carry cargo, personnel, litter patients, and mechanized equipment, and to drop cargo and troops by parachute.
A redesign of the XC-82B would result in the production of the C-119 Flying Boxcar.

Hagerstown, Maryland

HagerstownHagerstown, MDHagerstown (Washington, D.C.)
The first C-119 prototype (called the XC-82B) first flew in November 1947, with deliveries of C-119Bs from Fairchild's Hagerstown, Maryland factory beginning in December 1949.
Among the ones on display are: 1939 F24/UC-61C, 1945 C-82A, 1943 PT-19A, and the 1953 C-119.

Lockheed C-130 Hercules

C-130C-130 HerculesHercules
In 1958, the 317th absorbed the 465th, and transitioned to the C-130s, but the units of the former 60th Troop Carrier Wing, the 10th, 11th and 12th Troop Carrier Squadrons, continued to fly C-119s until 1962, the last non-Air Force Reserve and non-Air National Guard operational units to fly the "Boxcars."
The Korean War showed that World War II-era piston-engine transports—Fairchild C-119 Flying Boxcars, Douglas C-47 Skytrains and Curtiss C-46 Commandos—were no longer adequate.

Fairchild AC-119

AC-119G ''ShadowAC-119AC-119 gunships
The AC-119G "Shadow" gunship variant was fitted with four six-barrel 7.62×51mm NATO miniguns, armor plating, flare launchers, and night-capable infrared equipment.
The Fairchild C-119 Flying Boxcar presented an obvious choice, having been phased out of front-line service in favor of the C-123 and C-130, and with the stock of available airframes in U.S. Air Force Reserve being sufficient.

South Vietnam Air Force

South Vietnamese air forceAir ForceVNAF
Most Kaiser-built aircraft were issued to the U.S. Marine Corps as R4Qs, with several later turned over to the South Vietnamese air force in the 1970s.
At dawn on 29 April the VNAF began to haphazardly depart Tan Son Nhut Air Base as A-37s, F-5s, C-7s, C-119s and C-130s departed for Thailand while UH-1s took off in search of the ships of the U.S. Task Force 76 offshore.

60th Air Mobility Wing

60th Military Airlift Wing60th Troop Carrier Wing60th
From 1951 to 1962, C-119C, F and G models served with U.S. Air Forces in Europe (USAFE) and Far East Air Forces (FEAF) as the first-line Combat Cargo units, and did yeoman work as freight haulers with the 60th Troop Carrier Wing, the 317th Troop Carrier Wing and the 465th Troop Carrier Wing in Europe, based first in Germany and then in France with roughly 150 aircraft operating anywhere from Greenland to India.
Operating the C-82 Packet, C-119 Flying Boxcar, and C-47 Skytrain aircraft, the wing participated in countless exercises and provided air transportability training to US Army units.

456th Bombardment Wing

456th Troop Carrier Wing4126th Strategic Wing456th Strategic Aerospace Wing
The 456th Troop Carrier Wing, which was attached to the Strategic Air Command (SAC) from 25 April 1955 – 26 May 1956, used C-119s to retrieve instrument packages from high-altitude reconnaissance balloons.
The wing was activated in 1952 as the 456th Troop Carrier Wing, Medium, operating Fairchild C-119 Flying Boxcar transports.

Mid-air retrieval

mid-air recoveryrecovered in midairaerial recovery
Perhaps the most remarkable use of the C-119 was the aerial recovery of balloons, UAVs, and even satellites.
The first use of midair retrieval was in 1955, with Fairchild C-119 Flying Boxcar transports being used to recover Ryan AQM-34 Firebee target drones during test flights. On operational flights, the Firebee used the Sikorsky SH-3 Sea King helicopter as its recovery aircraft.

Air National Guard

ANGguardNational Guard
In 1958, the 317th absorbed the 465th, and transitioned to the C-130s, but the units of the former 60th Troop Carrier Wing, the 10th, 11th and 12th Troop Carrier Squadrons, continued to fly C-119s until 1962, the last non-Air Force Reserve and non-Air National Guard operational units to fly the "Boxcars."
With the active forces being reduced after the end of the Vietnam War, a significant number of older C-130A Hercules tactical airlifters became available for the Air National Guard and Air Force Reserve, which allowed the Korean War-era C-119 Flying Boxcars and C-124 Globemasters to be retired.

U.S. Forest Service airtanker scandal

transferred them to six private companies
(See U.S. Forest Service airtanker scandal.) After the end of the airtanker days, many C-119s flew in Alaska for Northern Pacific Transport, Gifford Aviation, Stebbins & Ambler Air transport, and Delta Associates, being used for public service contracts, such as hauling building materials to the villages in the bush of Alaska that have no road access.
In the 1980s, the bulk of the airtanker fleet consisted of C-119 Flying Boxcars which had been obtained from the military.

Fairchild XC-120 Packplane

C-128XC-120XC-120 Packplane
XC-120 Packplane
It was developed from the company's C-119 Flying Boxcar, and was unique in the unconventional use of removable cargo pods that were attached below the fuselage, instead of possessing an internal cargo compartment.

Corona (satellite)

CoronaKH-3 Corona Discoverer
C-119s from the 6593rd Test Squadron based at Hickam Air Force Base, Hawaii performed several aerial recoveries of film-return capsules during the early years of the Corona spy satellite program.
After the mission of Discoverer 14, launched on August 18, 1960, its film bucket was successfully retrieved two days later by a C-119 Flying Boxcar transport plane.

Battle of Chosin Reservoir

Chosin ReservoirChosin Reservoir campaignChosin
In December 1950, after Chinese PLA troops blew up a bridge at a narrow point on the evacuation route between Koto-ri and Hungnam, blocking the withdrawal of U.N. forces, eight U.S. Air Force C-119 Flying Boxcars flown by the 314th Troop Carrier Group.
With the path to Hungnam blocked at Funchilin Pass, eight C-119 Flying Boxcars flown by the US 314th Troop Carrier Wing were used to drop portable bridge sections by parachute.

Royal Moroccan Air Force

Air ForceRoyal Air ForceRoyal Moroccan Air Force (RMAF)
*Royal Moroccan Air Force received 12 former USAF aircraft and six former Canadian aircraft.
Transport aircraft acquired at the time included 10 Douglas C-47 Skytrains, 18 Fairchild C-119Gs and six Lockheed C-130 Hercules.

Chase Aircraft

Chase
No. 51-8098 to 51-8168) before converting the factory for a planned production of the Chase C-123 that never eventuated.
Kaiser had been awarded an earlier contract as a second source for construction of Fairchild's C-119, and the aircraft produced by Kaiser were proving to be significantly more expensive than those produced by Fairchild.

Ryan Firebee

BQM-34S Firebee IFirebeeRyan BQM-34A Firebee
The first use of this technique was in 1955, when C-119s were used to recover Ryan AQM-34 Firebee unmanned targets.
During early test flights, the Fairchild C-119 was used for this purpose, while on operational flights the Sikorsky SH-3 Sea King was the primary recovery platform.

Italian Air Force

Air ForceItalianItaly
*Italian Air Force operated 40 C-119G new aircraft as Mutual Defence Assistance Program, five C-119G former USAF and transferred to United Nations in December 1960 and 25 C-119J surplus USAF / ANG aircraft.
Next F-84F jet fighters and C-119 Flying Boxcar transport planes were sent from the United States to the Italian Air Force.

James B. McGovern Jr.

James B. McGovernJames B. McGovern, Jr. and Wallace BufordJames McGovern, Jr.
The only two American pilot casualties of the siege at Dien Bien Phu were James B. McGovern, Jr. ("Earthquake McGoon") and Wallace ("Wally") A. Buford.
His C-119 Flying Boxcar cargo plane was hit twice by ground fire, first in the port engine, then in the horizontal stabilizer, while parachuting a howitzer to the besieged French garrison at Dien Bien Phu during the First Indochina War.

1955 Altensteig mid-air collision

collidescollided over Edelweiler, GermanyTwo USAF C-119 Flying Boxcars
10 August 1955: Two aircraft of a nine-plane USAF flight on a training mission collided over Edelweiler, Germany. One of the C-119s had developed engine trouble and lost altitude, causing it to strike another aircraft in the formation. A total of 66 people on board the two aircraft were killed.
The Altensteig mid-air collision was on the 11 August 1955 when two United States Air Force Fairchild C-119G Flying Boxcars collided and crashed three miles from Altensteig in West Germany.

Pratt & Whitney R-4360 Wasp Major

R-4360Wasp MajorPratt & Whitney ''Wasp Major
Initially, the Kaiser-built C-119F differed from the Fairchild aircraft by the use of Wright R-3350-85 Duplex Cyclone engines in place of Fairchild's use of the Pratt & Whitney R-4360 Wasp Major radial engine.

910th Airlift Wing

910th Troop Carrier Group910th Tactical Air Support Group910th Airlift Group
16 December 1968: A C-119 assigned to the Air Force Reserve's 910th Tactical Air Support Group at Youngstown, Ohio, crashed shortly after its departure from Naval Station Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico on a flight to Homestead AFB, Florida. The wreckage was found at an elevation of 3400 ft near El Yunque. All eight occupants were killed. (Source: The Miami News, page 6-A, Dec. 17, 1968)
The group was equipped with Fairchild C-119 Flying Boxcars for Tactical Air Command airlift operations.