Fairchild C-123 Provider

C-123C-123 ProviderFairchild C-123K ProviderC-123K ProviderC-123sC-123BC-123B ProvidersUC-123C-123 Cargo planeC-123 Providers
The Fairchild C-123 Provider is an American military transport aircraft designed by Chase Aircraft and then built by Fairchild Aircraft for the U.S.wikipedia
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Chase Aircraft

Chase
The Fairchild C-123 Provider is an American military transport aircraft designed by Chase Aircraft and then built by Fairchild Aircraft for the U.S. Air Force. The C-123 Provider was designed originally as an assault glider aircraft for the United States Air Force (USAF) by Chase Aircraft as the XCG-20 (Chase designation MS-8 Avitruc) Two powered variants of the XCG-20 were developed during the early 1950s, as the XC-123 and XC-123A.
Plans to produce the C-123 transport for the United States Air Force collapsed amid scandal, and the company closed in 1953.

Fairchild Aircraft

FairchildFairchild Engine and Airplane CorporationFairchild Republic
The Fairchild C-123 Provider is an American military transport aircraft designed by Chase Aircraft and then built by Fairchild Aircraft for the U.S. Air Force.
In 1949 the Hagerstown, Maryland Fairchild Engine and Airplane Corporation developed the Chase XCG-20 glider into the C-123 Provider transport which entered service in 1955.

Chase XCG-20

XG-20CG-20XCG-20
The C-123 Provider was designed originally as an assault glider aircraft for the United States Air Force (USAF) by Chase Aircraft as the XCG-20 (Chase designation MS-8 Avitruc) Two powered variants of the XCG-20 were developed during the early 1950s, as the XC-123 and XC-123A.
The XG-20 did not see production due to a change in USAF requirements, however, it was modified into the successful Fairchild C-123 Provider twin-engined transport aircraft which saw extensive service in the Vietnam War.

De Havilland Canada DHC-5 Buffalo

CC-115 BuffaloDHC-5 Buffalode Havilland Canada DHC-5D Buffalo
The C-123 was nearly ignored by the USAF for service in Vietnam, but a political rivalry with the U.S. Army and the Army's use of the CV-2 Caribou and later pre-production order for the de Havilland Canada C-8 Buffalo, led to a decision to deploy C-123s there.
No further US orders followed, however, as at the start of 1967 (See the Johnson-McConnell agreement of 1966), inter-service politics led to large fixed-wing transports being transferred to the United States Air Force, who considered themselves adequately equipped with the Fairchild Aircraft C-123 Provider.

Agent Orange

defoliantAgent Orange § U.S. veterans class action lawsuit against manufacturersdefoliants
During the War in Vietnam, the C-123 was used to deliver supplies, to evacuate the wounded, and also used to spray Agent Orange.
Agent Orange was usually sprayed from helicopters or from low-flying C-123 Provider aircraft, fitted with sprayers and "MC-1 Hourglass" pump systems and 1000 U.S.gal chemical tanks.

Lockheed C-130 Hercules

C-130C-130 HerculesHercules
This aircraft was used in conjunction with the Lockheed C-130 Hercules and Lockheed C-141 Starlifter. The 302nd Tactical Airlift Wing at Rickenbacker AFB (later Rickenbacker ANGB), Ohio, flew the last UC-123Ks Providers in operational service before being converted to the Lockheed C-130 Hercules.
The Hercules resembled a larger four-engine brother to the C-123 Provider with a similar wing and cargo ramp layout that evolved from the Chase XCG-20 Avitruc, which in turn, was first designed and flown as a cargo glider in 1947.

Chase XC-123A

XC-123A
The C-123 Provider was designed originally as an assault glider aircraft for the United States Air Force (USAF) by Chase Aircraft as the XCG-20 (Chase designation MS-8 Avitruc) Two powered variants of the XCG-20 were developed during the early 1950s, as the XC-123 and XC-123A.
The sole prototype was converted into the piston-powered Stroukoff YC-123D to evaluate boundary layer control systems.

Operation Ranch Hand

defoliatingdefoliationdefoliation mission
The C-123 also gained notoriety for its use in "Operation Ranch Hand" defoliation operations in Vietnam.
The herbicides were sprayed by the U.S. Air Force flying C-123s using the call sign "Hades".

Stroukoff YC-134

YC-134C-134YC-123E
In 1955, Stroukoff, under contract from the USAF, produced a single YC-123E, designed to be able to take off from any surface, and also equipped with BLC.
The Stroukoff YC-134, designed in 1956, was based heavily on the Fairchild C-123 Provider.

Lockheed HC-130

HC-130HC-130HHC-130P
The HC-123B's role in the Coast Guard was slowly replaced by the longer-ranged Coast Guard HC-130 aircraft during the 1960s and 1970s as those newer airframes came on line.
U.S. Coast Guard HC-130Hs were primarily acquired for long-range overwater search missions, support airlift, maritime patrol, North Atlantic Ice Patrol and command and control of search and rescue, replacing previously operated HU-16 Albatross amphibious and HC-123 Provider land-based aircraft.

Fairchild AC-119

AC-119G ''ShadowAC-119AC-119 gunships
Only the usage of C-123s as "flare ships" to illuminate targets for fixed wing gunships such as the AC-47 and AC-119G were more numerous.
The Fairchild C-119 Flying Boxcar presented an obvious choice, having been phased out of front-line service in favor of the C-123 and C-130, and with the stock of available airframes in U.S. Air Force Reserve being sufficient.

Willow Run

Ford Willow RunWillow Run, MichiganAir Force Plant 31
Two airframes were completed at Kaiser's Willow Run factory in Ypsilanti, Michigan, before a pricing scandal that led to Kaiser's being told that no further contracts with him would be honored.
Kaiser also built two C-123 Provider airframes at Willow Run, which were scrapped before delivery, as a procurement scandal involving the company put an end to any chance for future Air Force contracts.

302d Airlift Wing

302d Troop Carrier Wing302d Tactical Airlift Wing302nd Bombardment Group
The 302nd Tactical Airlift Wing at Rickenbacker AFB (later Rickenbacker ANGB), Ohio, flew the last UC-123Ks Providers in operational service before being converted to the Lockheed C-130 Hercules.
Also in April 1973, the wing assumed an aerial spraying mission with UC-123 aircraft, which frequently took wing crews to Central America, the Caribbean, the Azores, North Africa, islands of the Pacific, and to many U.S. points for insect-spraying missions.

SS-100-X

presidential limousinelimousinePresident Kennedy's car
A C-123 was used to transport President John F. Kennedy's limousine during his November, 1963, Texas tour.
On November 21, 1963 SS-100-X was loaded onto a Fairchild C-123 Provider piloted by Captain Thomason of the 76th Air Transport Squadron and flown to San Antonio and then onto Dallas Love Field where it was stored in an underground car park.

Tactical Air Command

TACAir Defense, Tactical Air CommandAir Defense – Tactical Air Command (ADTAC)
With the end of the Vietnam War, remaining C-123Ks and UC-123Ks were transferred to tactical airlift units of the Air Force Reserve (AFRES) and the Air National Guard (ANG) that were operationally-gained by Tactical Air Command (TAC) before 1975 and Military Airlift Command (MAC) after 1975.
In December 1964, TAC deployed a squadron of C-123 Provider assault transports from the 464th Troop Carrier Wing at Pope AFB, North Carolina to Clark Air Base, Philippines, then on to Tan Son Nhut Air Base, South Vietnam to set up a tactical air cargo transportation system.

Nakhon Phanom Royal Thai Navy Base

Nakhon PhanomNakhon Phanom Air BaseNakhon Phanom Royal Thai Air Force Base
The "Candle" aircraft had an extended life when several UC-123Ks were transferred to Nakhon Phanom Royal Thai Air Force Base in Thailand.
606th Air Commando Squadron (redesignated 606th Special Operations Squadron 1 August 1968), 8 April 1967 - 15 June 1971, call sign: Candlesticks (C-123 Flareships) and Loudmouth/Litterbugs (U-10D, C-123B, T-28D, Tail Code: TO)

Black Bat Squadron

Black Bat
In 1962, the CIA acquired five C-123Bs from USAF for Air America to be used in Laos and Vietnam, and another 5 C-123Bs to be used by Republic of China Air Force (Taiwan) top secret 34th Squadron, a Black Ops units called the "Black Bat", as Flight B section (Flight A section was the two P2V-2U/RB-69A).
Unit's aircraft included the Boeing B-17G, Douglas A-26C/B-26C Invader, 7 Lockheed RB-69A, Douglas C-54, 11 Fairchild C-123B/K Provider, Lockheed C-130E Hercules, and 3 "black" Lockheed P-3A Orion (149669, 149673, 149678).

Museum of Aviation (Warner Robins)

Museum of Aviation
Further, Major Carter located Air Force reports of dioxin-contaminated aircraft sold abroad, and of one used at the Robins AFB, Georgia Museum of Aviation with public access to the contaminated surfaces of the aircraft.
Fairchild UC-123K "Provider"

Eugene Hasenfus

Loadmaster Eugene Hasenfus parachuted to safety and was taken prisoner.
On October 5, 1986, Hasenfus was aboard a Fairchild C-123 cargo plane, N4410F, when it was shot down over Nicaragua by the Sandinista government.

Forward air control

forward air controllerFACforward air controllers
During that period, it was used as a flare ship as well as a forward air control (FAC) aircraft.
C-123 Provider cargo aircraft were used as flareships to light up the Trail and direct air strikes, under the call sign "Candlestick", until late 1969.

General Electric J85

J85GE J-85GE J85
A "Jet Augmentation Program" for existing C-123Bs had been initiated in 1955 at the behest of the USAF, and in the YC-123H contract the USAF expanded it to allow the mounting of two pod-mounted General Electric J85 turbojets.
Fairchild C-123 Provider

Ubon Royal Thai Air Force Base

UbonUbon Air BaseUbon Air Force Base
The aircraft operated there until January 1969, when they were redeployed to Ubon RTAB, Thailand.
The 16th SOS also tested 2 Project Black Spot AC/NC-123s beginning in December 1969.

Royal Lao Air Force

Laotian Aviation
Royal Lao Air Force
The U.S. Air Force 315th Air Division sent a detachment incountry dressed in civilian clothing on a month's temporary duty to operate C-119G Flying Boxcars, C-123 Providers, and C-130 Hercules transports in support of the Royalists.

Nha Trang Air Base

Nha Trang AirportNha TrangNha Trang AB
The six "Duck Hook" C-123Bs were based at Nha Trang Air Base, north of Cam Ranh Bay, officially designated as USAF Det. 12 of 1131 Special Activities Squadron.
From February 1964 3 C-123Bs and 3 air commando C-47s were kept at Nha Trang to support operations of the 5th Special Forces Group which had its headquarters at Nha Trang.

Con Air

Con Air: Music from the Motion Picturefilm ''Con AirPersonal Stuff
1 August 2010: The aircraft used for flying scenes in the movie Con Air, C-123K, former AF Ser. No. 54-0709, FAA registration N709RR (cn: 20158), crashed in Denali National Park while performing a cargo flight for All West Freight. All three crew members died.
While in prison, Poe communicates with Tricia and his newborn daughter Casey through letters; eight years later, he is paroled and takes a flight to Alabama on board the Jailbird, a Fairchild C-123 Provider converted into a flying prison transport.