Fairfax Resolves

The Fairfax Resolves was a set of resolutions adopted by a committee in Fairfax County in the colony of Virginia on July 18, 1774, in the early stages of the American Revolution.wikipedia
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George Mason

George Mason IVaddressedMason
Written primarily by George Mason, the resolutions rejected the British Parliament's claim of supreme authority over the American colonies.
His writings, including substantial portions of the Fairfax Resolves of 1774, the Virginia Declaration of Rights of 1776, and his Objections to this Constitution of Government (1787) opposing ratification, have exercised a significant influence on American political thought and events.

George Washington

WashingtonGeneral WashingtonGeneral George Washington
George Washington and Charles Broadwater were elected as Fairfax County's representatives to the convention.
That July, he and George Mason drafted a list of resolutions for the Fairfax County committee which Washington chaired, and the committee adopted the Fairfax Resolves calling for a Continental Congress.

Thomas Lewis (Virginia)

Thomas LewisThomas
He was a signatory to the Fairfax Resolves preceding the American War for Independence, and after the conflict, contributed to the settlement of western Virginia in an area that would one day become part of West Virginia.

Robert H. Harrison

Robert Hanson HarrisonRobert HarrisonHarrison, Robert H.
In the years prior to the American Revolution, Harrison became identified with the Patriot cause in Virginia; he supported the Virginia Nonimportation Resolves in 1770, and served as the clerk for the Fairfax Resolves in 1774.

Resolution (law)

resolutionresolutionsparliamentary resolution
The Fairfax Resolves was a set of resolutions adopted by a committee in Fairfax County in the colony of Virginia on July 18, 1774, in the early stages of the American Revolution.

Fairfax County, Virginia

Fairfax CountyFairfaxFairfax County, VA
The Fairfax Resolves was a set of resolutions adopted by a committee in Fairfax County in the colony of Virginia on July 18, 1774, in the early stages of the American Revolution.

Colony of Virginia

VirginiaVirginia Colonycolonial Virginia
The Fairfax Resolves was a set of resolutions adopted by a committee in Fairfax County in the colony of Virginia on July 18, 1774, in the early stages of the American Revolution.

American Revolution

RevolutionRevolutionary WarRevolutionary
The Fairfax Resolves was a set of resolutions adopted by a committee in Fairfax County in the colony of Virginia on July 18, 1774, in the early stages of the American Revolution.

Parliament of Great Britain

ParliamentBritish ParliamentGreat Britain
Written primarily by George Mason, the resolutions rejected the British Parliament's claim of supreme authority over the American colonies.

Thirteen Colonies

American coloniescoloniescolonial
Written primarily by George Mason, the resolutions rejected the British Parliament's claim of supreme authority over the American colonies.

Intolerable Acts

Coercive Actsactsamong other actions
After Parliament passed the Coercive Acts, also known as the Intolerable Acts, to punish Massachusetts for the Boston Tea Party, the Virginia House of Burgesses proclaimed that June 1, 1774, would be a day of "fasting, humiliation, and prayer" as a show of solidarity with Boston.

Massachusetts Bay Colony

MassachusettsMassachusetts Bay CompanyMassachusetts Bay
After Parliament passed the Coercive Acts, also known as the Intolerable Acts, to punish Massachusetts for the Boston Tea Party, the Virginia House of Burgesses proclaimed that June 1, 1774, would be a day of "fasting, humiliation, and prayer" as a show of solidarity with Boston.

Boston Tea Party

The Boston Tea PartyTea Partytea was thrown into the harbor
After Parliament passed the Coercive Acts, also known as the Intolerable Acts, to punish Massachusetts for the Boston Tea Party, the Virginia House of Burgesses proclaimed that June 1, 1774, would be a day of "fasting, humiliation, and prayer" as a show of solidarity with Boston.

House of Burgesses

Virginia House of BurgessesBurgessHouse of Burgesses of Virginia
After Parliament passed the Coercive Acts, also known as the Intolerable Acts, to punish Massachusetts for the Boston Tea Party, the Virginia House of Burgesses proclaimed that June 1, 1774, would be a day of "fasting, humiliation, and prayer" as a show of solidarity with Boston.

John Murray, 4th Earl of Dunmore

Lord DunmoreGovernor DunmoreJohn Murray
In response, Lord Dunmore, the royal governor of Virginia, dissolved the House of Burgesses.

Raleigh Tavern

The burgesses reconvened at the Raleigh Tavern on May 27 and called for Virginia's counties to elect delegates to a special convention to meet in August.

Virginia Conventions

special conventionFirst Virginia Conventionprovisional assembly
The burgesses reconvened at the Raleigh Tavern on May 27 and called for Virginia's counties to elect delegates to a special convention to meet in August.

Alexandria, Virginia

AlexandriaAlexandria, VAAlexandria City
On July 5, 1774, Washington and others from Fairfax County met in Alexandria, Virginia, to appoint a committee to draft a statement that would, as Washington described it, "define our Constitutional Rights."

Mount Vernon

Mt. VernonMount Vernon PlantationMount Vernon Estate
Mason and Washington met at Washington's Mount Vernon home on July 17, and perhaps revised the resolutions.

Freehold (law)

freeholdfreeholdersfreeholder
The following day in Alexandria, the Fairfax Resolves were endorsed in a meeting of freeholders chaired by Washington.

Patrick Henry

American patriotPatrick Henry, Junrthat revolutionary patriot
Finally, political rivalries in Virginia were muted to some degree, allowing such figures as Washington and Mason to work productively with the more radical Patrick Henry, Richard Henry Lee and others.

Richard Henry Lee

Richard LeeFrancis Lightfoot Lee IILee
Finally, political rivalries in Virginia were muted to some degree, allowing such figures as Washington and Mason to work productively with the more radical Patrick Henry, Richard Henry Lee and others.

Virginia Association

Non-Importation Agreement
The non-importation protest called for in the Resolves influenced, with some modifications, the Virginia Association, which in turn provided the pattern for the Continental Association.

Continental Association

Articles of Associationassociationboycott of British goods
The non-importation protest called for in the Resolves influenced, with some modifications, the Virginia Association, which in turn provided the pattern for the Continental Association.