Fantasy (psychology)

fantasyfantasiesfantasistphantasyfantasy lifefantasizesfantasy worldphantasiesfantasisesfantasize
Fantasy in a psychological sense refers to two different possible aspects of the mind, the conscious, and the unconscious.wikipedia
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Sexual fantasy

sexual fantasiesfantasyerotic fantasy
Fantasies can also be sexual in nature.
A sexual fantasy can be created by the person's imagination or memory, and may be triggered autonomously or by external stimulation such as erotic literature or pornography, a physical object, or sexual attraction to another person.

Walter Mitty

George Eman Vaillant in his study of defence mechanisms took as a central example of "an immature defence ... fantasy — living in a 'Walter Mitty' dream world where you imagine you are successful and popular, instead of making real efforts to make friends and succeed at a job."
Mitty is a meek, mild man with a vivid fantasy life.

Imagination

imaginativeimaginaryimaginative faculty
A fantasy is a situation imagined by an individual that expresses certain desires or aims on the part of its creator.

Melanie Klein

KleinianKleinKleinians
Melanie Klein extended Freud's concept of fantasy to cover the developing child's relationship to a world of internal objects.
Klein suggested that pre-verbal existential anxiety in infancy catalyzed the formation of the unconscious, resulting in the unconscious splitting of the world into good and bad idealizations.

Defence mechanism

defense mechanismdefense mechanismsdefence mechanisms
George Eman Vaillant in his study of defence mechanisms took as a central example of "an immature defence ... fantasy — living in a 'Walter Mitty' dream world where you imagine you are successful and popular, instead of making real efforts to make friends and succeed at a job." A similarly positive view of fantasy was taken by Sigmund Freud who considered fantasy (Fantasie) a defence mechanism.

Mind

mentalhuman mindmental content
Fantasy in a psychological sense refers to two different possible aspects of the mind, the conscious, and the unconscious.

Consciousness

consciousconsciouslyhuman consciousness
Fantasy in a psychological sense refers to two different possible aspects of the mind, the conscious, and the unconscious.

Unconscious mind

unconsciousunconsciouslythe unconscious
Fantasy in a psychological sense refers to two different possible aspects of the mind, the conscious, and the unconscious.

George Eman Vaillant

George VaillantGeorge E. VaillantVaillant
George Eman Vaillant in his study of defence mechanisms took as a central example of "an immature defence ... fantasy — living in a 'Walter Mitty' dream world where you imagine you are successful and popular, instead of making real efforts to make friends and succeed at a job."

Narcissistic personality disorder

megalomanianarcissisticmegalomaniac
Fantasy, when pushed to the extreme, is a common trait of narcissistic personality disorder; and Vaillant found that "not one person who used fantasy a lot had any close friends."

Deirdre Barrett

Research by Deirdre Barrett reports that people differ radically in the vividness, as well as frequency of fantasy, and that those who have the most elaborately developed fantasy life are often the people who make productive use of their imaginations in art, literature, or by being especially creative and innovative in more traditional professions.

Sigmund Freud

FreudFreudianFreudian theory
A similarly positive view of fantasy was taken by Sigmund Freud who considered fantasy (Fantasie) a defence mechanism.

Theodor Fontane

FontaneFontanes
He considered that men and women "cannot subsist on the scanty satisfaction which they can extort from reality. 'We simply cannot do without auxiliary constructions,' as Theodor Fontane once said ... [without] dwelling on imaginary wish fulfillments."

Wish fulfillment

wish-fulfillmentfulfillment of a wishfulfillment of wishes
He considered that men and women "cannot subsist on the scanty satisfaction which they can extort from reality. 'We simply cannot do without auxiliary constructions,' as Theodor Fontane once said ... [without] dwelling on imaginary wish fulfillments."

Daydream

daydreamingdaydreamsday dreaming
Daydreams for Freud were thus a valuable resource.

Schizophrenia

schizophrenicschizophrenicspositive symptoms
In the context of occurrences of the mental disorder known as schizophrenia, individuals who exhibit symptoms fulfilling this particular classification might be experiencing fantasies as part of the diagnosis (Shneidman, E. S. 1948).

Default mode network

default networkDefault modedefault mode system
Scientific investigation into activity of the so-called default network within the brain (Randy Buckner et al. 2008) has shown individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia have high levels ("...overactive...") of activity within their brains.

Controversial discussions

The term "fantasy" became a central issue with the development of the Kleinian group as a distinctive strand within the British Psycho-Analytical Society, and was at the heart of the so-called controversial discussions of the wartime years.

Paradigm

paradigmsparadigmaticscientific paradigm
Isaacs however claimed that "Freud's 'hallucinatory wish-fulfilment' and his 'introjection' and 'projection' are the basis of the fantasy life," and how far unconscious fantasy was a genuine development of Freud's ideas, how far it represented the formation of a new psychoanalytic paradigm, is perhaps the key question of the controversial discussions.

Jacques Lacan

LacanLacanianJaques Lacan
Lacan engaged from early on with "the phantasies revealed by Melanie Klein ... the imago of the mother ... this shadow of the bad internal objects" — with the Imaginary.

The Imaginary (psychoanalysis)

the ImaginaryimaginaryImaginary order
Lacan engaged from early on with "the phantasies revealed by Melanie Klein ... the imago of the mother ... this shadow of the bad internal objects" — with the Imaginary.

Schizoid personality disorder

schizoidschizoid personalitySchizoids
Affected individuals may be unable to form intimate attachments to others and simultaneously possess a rich and elaborate but exclusively internal fantasy world.

Fantasy prone personality

fantasy pronenessfantasy-prone personalityoveractive imagination
Fantasy prone personality (FPP) is a disposition or personality trait in which a person experiences a lifelong extensive and deep involvement in fantasy.

Pornotopia

Pornotopia is a fantasy state dominated by universal sexual activity, such as the idealized, imaginative space of pornography.