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Danish Defence

Danish militaryMilitary of DenmarkDanish Armed Forces
Those that remain the responsibility of Denmark include military defence, policing and the justice department, currency, and foreign affairs.
Danish Defence (Forsvaret, Danska verjan, Illersuisut) is the unified armed forces of the Kingdom of Denmark, charged with the defence of Denmark and its constituent, self-governing nations Greenland and the Faroe Islands.

Autonomous administrative division

autonomous regionautonomousautonomy
It is an autonomous territory within the Kingdom of Denmark.

Faroese language

FaroeseFaeroeseOld Faroese
In Faroese, the name appears as Føroyar. The national awakening from 1888 initially arose from a struggle to maintain the Faroese language and was thus culturally oriented, but after 1906 it became more political with the foundation of political parties of the Faroe Islands.
Faroese ( or ; føroyskt mál, ) is a North Germanic language spoken as a first language by about 72,000 people, around 49,000 of whom reside on the Faroe Islands and 23,000 in other areas, mainly Denmark.

Police of Denmark

Danish policepoliceDanish National Police
Those that remain the responsibility of Denmark include military defence, policing and the justice department, currency, and foreign affairs.
The police of Denmark consists of 12 districts each managed by a director and two minor districts in Greenland and the Faroe Islands, run by a local chief of police.

Nordic Council

Nordic Council of MinistersPresident of the Nordic CouncilNC
The islands also have representation in the Nordic Council as members of the Danish delegation.
Formed in 1952, it has 87 representatives from Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden as well as from the autonomous areas of the Faroe Islands, Greenland, and the Åland Islands.

Shetland

Shetland IslandsShetland IslesShetlands
The Norse and Norse–Gael settlers probably did not come directly from Scandinavia, but rather from Norse communities surrounding the Irish Sea, Northern Isles and Outer Hebrides of Scotland, including the Shetland and Orkney islands.
Shetland (Shetland, Sealtainn), also called the Shetland Islands and formerly Zetland, is a subarctic archipelago in the Northern Isles of Scotland, situated in the Northern Atlantic, between Great Britain, the Faroe Islands and Norway.

Scandinavia

Scandinavian countriesScandinavianNordic
He also suggested that the people living there might have been from Ireland, Scotland, or Scandinavia, possibly with groups from all three areas settling there.
The Faroe Islands are sometimes included.

Vikings

VikingNorseDanes
Scientists from the University of Aberdeen have also found early cereal pollen from domesticated plants, which further suggests people may have lived on the islands before the Vikings arrived.
During the 20th century, the meaning of the term was expanded to refer to not only seaborne raiders from Scandinavia and other places settled by them (like Iceland and the Faroe Islands), but also any member of the culture that produced said raiders during the period from the late 8th to the mid-11th centuries, or more loosely from about 700 to as late as about 1100.

Norway

NorwegianKingdom of NorwayNOR
The Faroe Islands (Føroyar, ; Færøerne, ), or the Faeroe Islands, is a North Atlantic archipelago located 200 mi north-northwest of Scotland, and about halfway between Norway and Iceland. The Faroe Islands are an island group consisting of 18 major islands (and a total of 779 islands, islets, and skerries) about 655 km off the coast of Northern Europe, between the Norwegian Sea and the North Atlantic Ocean, about halfway between Iceland and Norway, the closest neighbours being the Northern Isles and the Outer Hebrides of Scotland.
Norwegian Viking explorers first discovered Iceland by accident in the 9th century when heading for the Faroe Islands, and eventually came across Vinland, known today as Newfoundland, in Canada.

List of political parties on the Faroe Islands

political partyFaroe IslandsList of political parties in the Faroe Islands
The national awakening from 1888 initially arose from a struggle to maintain the Faroese language and was thus culturally oriented, but after 1906 it became more political with the foundation of political parties of the Faroe Islands.
The Faroe Islands have a multi-party system, with numerous parties in which no one party often has a chance of gaining power alone, and parties must work with each other to form coalition governments.

Treaty of Kiel

Peace of Kielfell to the coalitionKiel Treaty
In 1814 the Treaty of Kiel transferred Norway to the king of Sweden, on the winning side of the Napoleonic wars, whereas the king of Denmark, on the losing side, retained the Faroes, along with the two other historical Norwegian island possessions in the North Atlantic: Greenland and Iceland.
Specifically excluded from the exchange were the Norwegian dependencies of Greenland, Iceland and the Faroe Islands, which remained in the union with Denmark.

Færeyinga saga

Faeringa Saga
According to the Færeyinga saga, more emigrants left Norway who did not approve of the monarchy of Harald Fairhair (ruled c. 872 to 930).
The Færeyinga Saga, the saga of the Faroe Islands, is the story of how the Faroe Islanders were converted to Christianity and became a part of Norway.

Sigmundur Brestisson

HeriHeri SigmundssonSigmund Brestursson
Tróndur led the battle against Sigmund Brestursson, the Norwegian monarchy and the Norwegian church.
Sigmundur Brestisson (961–1005) was a Faroese viking chieftain, and was responsible for introducing Christianity to the Faroe Islands in 999.

Vágar Airport

Vagar AirportRAF Vágarthe Faroes' only airport
In 1942–1943 the British Royal Engineers, under the leadership of Lt. Col. William Law MC, built the only airport in the Faroe Islands, Vágar Airport.
Vágar Airport (Vága Floghavn) is the only airport in the Faroe Islands, and is located 1 NM east of the village of Sørvágur, on the island of Vágar.

Iceland

IcelandicISLRepublic of Iceland
The Faroe Islands (Føroyar, ; Færøerne, ), or the Faeroe Islands, is a North Atlantic archipelago located 200 mi north-northwest of Scotland, and about halfway between Norway and Iceland. In 1814 the Treaty of Kiel transferred Norway to the king of Sweden, on the winning side of the Napoleonic wars, whereas the king of Denmark, on the losing side, retained the Faroes, along with the two other historical Norwegian island possessions in the North Atlantic: Greenland and Iceland. The Faroe Islands are an island group consisting of 18 major islands (and a total of 779 islands, islets, and skerries) about 655 km off the coast of Northern Europe, between the Norwegian Sea and the North Atlantic Ocean, about halfway between Iceland and Norway, the closest neighbours being the Northern Isles and the Outer Hebrides of Scotland.
The closest bodies of land in Europe are the Faroe Islands (420 km); Jan Mayen Island (570 km); Shetland and the Outer Hebrides, both about 740 km; and the Scottish mainland and Orkney, both about 750 km.

Lutheranism

LutheranEvangelical LutheranLutherans
The Reformation with Protestant Evangelical Lutheranism and Reformed reached the Faroes in 1538.
Lutheranism spread through all of Scandinavia during the 16th century, as the monarch of Denmark–Norway (also ruling Iceland and the Faroe Islands) and the monarch of Sweden (also ruling Finland) adopted Lutheranism.

Tróndur í Gøtu

Trónd
According to Icelandic sagas such as Færeyjar Saga, one of the best known men in the island was Tróndur í Gøtu, a descendant of Scandinavian chiefs who had settled in Dublin, Ireland.
945 – 1035) was a Viking era chieftain from the Faroe Islands.

British occupation of the Faroe Islands

British occupation of the Faroe Islands in World War IIFaroe IslandsBritish occupation government
In the first year of World War II, on 12 April 1940, British troops occupied the Faroe Islands, shortly after the Operation Weserübung with the Nazi German invasion of Denmark on 9 April 1940.
In April 1940, the United Kingdom occupied the strategically important Faroe Islands to forestall a German invasion.

List of islands of the Faroe Islands

Island18 major islandsIslands of the Faroe Islands
The Faroe Islands are an island group consisting of 18 major islands (and a total of 779 islands, islets, and skerries) about 655 km off the coast of Northern Europe, between the Norwegian Sea and the North Atlantic Ocean, about halfway between Iceland and Norway, the closest neighbours being the Northern Isles and the Outer Hebrides of Scotland.
This is a list of islands of the Faroe Islands.

Republic (Faroe Islands)

RepublicRepublican PartyTjóðveldi
Since then, support for independence has grown and is the objective of the Republican Party.
Republic (Tjóðveldi), formerly known as the Republican Party (Tjóðveldisflokkurin) is a left-wing political party on the Faroe Islands committed to Faroese independence.

1946 Faroese independence referendum

1946 independence referendumreferendum1946
The 1946 Faroese independence referendum resulted in 50.73% in favor of independence to 49.27% against.
An independence referendum was held in the Faroe Islands on 14 September 1946.

List of lakes of the Faroe Islands

small lakeslake on the Faroe IslandsLakes of the Faroe Islands
mi) and have small lakes and rivers, but no major ones.
The most important lakes in the Faroe Islands are Leitisvatn on Vágar, Fjallavatn also on Vágar, Sandsvatn on Sandoy, Lake Eiði on Eysturoy and Lake Toftir on Eysturoy.

Scotland

Scottish🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿Scots
The Norse and Norse–Gael settlers probably did not come directly from Scandinavia, but rather from Norse communities surrounding the Irish Sea, Northern Isles and Outer Hebrides of Scotland, including the Shetland and Orkney islands. He also suggested that the people living there might have been from Ireland, Scotland, or Scandinavia, possibly with groups from all three areas settling there. The Faroe Islands (Føroyar, ; Færøerne, ), or the Faeroe Islands, is a North Atlantic archipelago located 200 mi north-northwest of Scotland, and about halfway between Norway and Iceland. The Faroe Islands are an island group consisting of 18 major islands (and a total of 779 islands, islets, and skerries) about 655 km off the coast of Northern Europe, between the Norwegian Sea and the North Atlantic Ocean, about halfway between Iceland and Norway, the closest neighbours being the Northern Isles and the Outer Hebrides of Scotland.
The island of Ireland lies only 21 km from the south-western peninsula of Kintyre; Norway is 305 km to the east and the Faroe Islands, 270 km to the north.

Norwegian Sea

NorwegianIcelandic SeaNorth Norwegian Sea
The Faroe Islands are an island group consisting of 18 major islands (and a total of 779 islands, islets, and skerries) about 655 km off the coast of Northern Europe, between the Norwegian Sea and the North Atlantic Ocean, about halfway between Iceland and Norway, the closest neighbours being the Northern Isles and the Outer Hebrides of Scotland.
In the southwest, it is separated from the Atlantic Ocean by a submarine ridge running between Iceland and the Faroe Islands.

Kalmar Union

Union of Kalmarunion kingDanish
Norwegian control of the Faroes continued until 1814, although, when the Kingdom of Norway (872–1397) entered the Kalmar Union with Denmark, it gradually resulted in Danish control of the islands.
The Kalmar Union (Danish, Norwegian, and Kalmarunionen; Unio Calmariensis) was a personal union in Scandinavia that from 1397 to 1523 joined under a single monarch of the three kingdoms of Denmark, Sweden (then including most of Finland), and Norway, together with Norway's overseas dependencies (then including Iceland, Greenland, the Faroe Islands, and the Northern Isles).