Fascia

superficial fasciafascialfasciaefasciæmyofasciaMyofascialsuperficial fascial supportsfascial planeparietal fascia
A fascia (plural fasciae ; adjective fascial; from Latin: "band") is a band or sheet of connective tissue, primarily collagen, beneath the skin that attaches, stabilizes, encloses, and separates muscles and other internal organs.wikipedia
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Ligament

ligamentsknee ligamentcapsular ligaments
Like ligaments, aponeuroses, and tendons, fascia is made up of fibrous connective tissue containing closely packed bundles of collagen fibers oriented in a wavy pattern parallel to the direction of pull.
Ligaments are similar to tendons and fasciae as they are all made of connective tissue.

Aponeurosis

aponeurosesaponeurotictendons
Like ligaments, aponeuroses, and tendons, fascia is made up of fibrous connective tissue containing closely packed bundles of collagen fibers oriented in a wavy pattern parallel to the direction of pull.
An aponeurosis (plural: aponeuroses) is a type or a variant of the deep fascia, in the form of a sheet of pearly-white fibrous tissue that attaches sheet-like muscles needing a wide area of attachment.

Deep fascia

investing fasciafasciadeep investing fascia
Fascia is classified by layer, as superficial fascia, deep fascia, and visceral or parietal fascia, or by its function and anatomical location.
Deep fascia (or investing fascia) is a fascia, a layer of dense connective tissue that can surround individual muscles and groups of muscles to separate into fascial compartments.

Fascia of Scarpa

Scarpa's fasciaScarpa
The fascia of Scarpa is the deep membranous layer (stratum membranosum), of the superficial fascia of the abdomen.

Transversalis fascia

transverse fasciafascia transversalis
It forms part of the general layer of fascia lining the abdominal parietes, and is directly continuous with the iliac fascia, internal spermatic, and pelvic fasciae.

Subcutaneous tissue

subcutaneoussubcutaneous fathypodermis
In addition to its subcutaneous presence, superficial fascia surrounds organs and glands, neurovascular bundles, and is found at many other locations where it fills otherwise unoccupied space.
The subcutaneous tissue, also called the hypodermis, hypoderm, subcutis, or superficial fascia, is the lowermost layer of the integumentary system in vertebrates.

Human skin

skinoily skinskin aging
Superficial fascia is the lowermost layer of the skin in nearly all of the regions of the body, that blends with the reticular dermis layer.

Neurovascular bundle

nerves, arteries, or veinsneurovascularneurovascular structures
In addition to its subcutaneous presence, superficial fascia surrounds organs and glands, neurovascular bundles, and is found at many other locations where it fills otherwise unoccupied space.
As arteries do not travel within the superficial fascia (loose connective tissue under the skin), superficial neurovascular bundles differ from deep neurovascular bundles in both composition and function.

Collagen

procollagencollagenscollagen fibers
A fascia (plural fasciae ; adjective fascial; from Latin: "band") is a band or sheet of connective tissue, primarily collagen, beneath the skin that attaches, stabilizes, encloses, and separates muscles and other internal organs.
Collagen has great tensile strength, and is the main component of fascia, cartilage, ligaments, tendons, bone and skin.

Fascial compartment

compartmentanatomic compartmentanatomic compartments
Deep fascia is a layer of dense fibrous connective tissue which surrounds individual muscles, and also divides groups of muscles into fascial compartments.
A fascial compartment is a section within the body that contains muscles and nerves and is surrounded by fascia.

Connective tissue

fibrous tissuefibrous connective tissueconnective
Like ligaments, aponeuroses, and tendons, fascia is made up of fibrous connective tissue containing closely packed bundles of collagen fibers oriented in a wavy pattern parallel to the direction of pull. A fascia (plural fasciae ; adjective fascial; from Latin: "band") is a band or sheet of connective tissue, primarily collagen, beneath the skin that attaches, stabilizes, encloses, and separates muscles and other internal organs.

Fasciitis

When inflammatory fasciitis or trauma causes fibrosis and adhesions, fascial tissue fails to differentiate the adjacent structures effectively.
Fasciitis is an inflammation of the fascia, which is the connective tissue surrounding muscles, blood vessels and nerves.

Fascial compartments of leg

fascial compartments of the legfascial compartmentleg compartments
Likewise, the lower limbs can be divided into two segments – the leg and the thigh and these contain the fascial compartments of the leg and the fascial compartments of the thigh.
The compartments are divided by septa formed from the fascia.

Fasciotomy

Fasciotomiesfasciectomysurgery to open the compartment
A fasciotomy may be used to relieve compartment syndrome as a result of high pressure within a fascial compartment.
Fasciotomy or fasciectomy is a surgical procedure where the fascia is cut to relieve tension or pressure commonly to treat the resulting loss of circulation to an area of tissue or muscle.

Clavipectoral fascia

coracoclavicular fascia
The clavipectoral fascia (costocoracoid membrane; coracoclavicular fascia) is a strong fascia situated under cover of the clavicular portion of the pectoralis major.

Arm

upper armarmsbroken arm
In the human body, the limbs can each be divided into two segments – the upper limb can be divided into the arm and the forearm and the sectional compartments of both of these – the fascial compartments of the arm and the fascial compartments of the forearm contain an anterior and a posterior compartment.
The arm is divided by a fascial layer (known as lateral and medial intermuscular septa) separating the muscles into two osteofascial compartments: the anterior and the posterior compartments of the arm.

Thoracolumbar fascia

lumbodorsal fascia
Examples of deep fascia are fascia lata, fascia cruris, brachial fascia, plantar fascia, thoracolumbar fascia and Buck's fascia.

Thigh

thighsmedial thighmid-thighs
Likewise, the lower limbs can be divided into two segments – the leg and the thigh and these contain the fascial compartments of the leg and the fascial compartments of the thigh.
In cross-section, the thigh is divided up into three separate compartments, divided by fascia, each containing muscles.

Compartment syndrome

compartmental syndromecompartment syndromesacute compartment syndrome
A fasciotomy may be used to relieve compartment syndrome as a result of high pressure within a fascial compartment.
Because the fascia layer that defines the compartment of the limbs does not stretch, a small amount of bleeding into the compartment, or swelling of the muscles within the compartment, can cause the pressure to rise greatly.

Fascial compartments of arm

lateral intermuscular septumposterior compartment of the armintermuscular septum
In the human body, the limbs can each be divided into two segments – the upper limb can be divided into the arm and the forearm and the sectional compartments of both of these – the fascial compartments of the arm and the fascial compartments of the forearm contain an anterior and a posterior compartment.

Latin

Latin languageLat.la
A fascia (plural fasciae ; adjective fascial; from Latin: "band") is a band or sheet of connective tissue, primarily collagen, beneath the skin that attaches, stabilizes, encloses, and separates muscles and other internal organs.

Skin

cutaneousskin cellanimal skin
A fascia (plural fasciae ; adjective fascial; from Latin: "band") is a band or sheet of connective tissue, primarily collagen, beneath the skin that attaches, stabilizes, encloses, and separates muscles and other internal organs.

Tendon

tendonssinewtendinous
Like ligaments, aponeuroses, and tendons, fascia is made up of fibrous connective tissue containing closely packed bundles of collagen fibers oriented in a wavy pattern parallel to the direction of pull.

Fibroblast

fibroblastsfeeder cellfibroblastic
These collagen fibers are produced by fibroblasts located within the fascia.

Bone

cortical bonebone tissuecancellous bone
They differ in their location and function: ligaments join one bone to another bone, tendons join muscle to bone, and fasciae surround muscles and other structures.